Page:The Bostonians (London & New York, Macmillan & Co., 1886).djvu/286

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276
XXVIII.
THE BOSTONIANS.

with every appearance of a conciliatory purpose—'I wish to thank her for all the interesting information she has given me this evening.'

'If you think it generous to come and scoff at her, of course she has no defence; you will be glad to know that.'

'Dear Miss Chancellor, if you are not a defence—a battery of many guns!' Ransom exclaimed.

'Well, she at least is not mine!' Olive returned, springing to her feet. She looked round her as if she were really pressed too hard, panting like a hunted creature.

'Your defence is your certain immunity from attack. Perhaps if you won't tell me where you are staying, you will kindly ask Miss Tarrant herself to do so. Would she send me a word on a card?'

'We are in West Tenth Street,' Olive said; and she gave the number. 'Of course you are free to come.'

'Of course I am! Why shouldn't I be? But I am greatly obliged to you for the information. I will ask her to come out, so that you won't see us.' And he turned away, with the sense that it was really insufferable, her attempt always to give him the air of being in the wrong. If that was the kind of spirit in which women were going to act when they had more power!