Page:The Folk-Lore Journal Volume 4 1886.djvu/268

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260

SONGS.

"I've a dogskin hairy budget
Tied fast upon my back,
[With my staff in my hand I trudge it,
Crying, Neighbours, what d'ye lack?]
I'll buy an old kettle, I'll mend an old kettle,
I'll mend an old kettle all round;
With my rink-a-tink tink, and a sup more drink,
I'll make your old kettle cry sound,
Sound, sound!
I'll make your old kettle cry sound.

"I've a snuff-box in my pocket,
As large as you might suppose,
As large as any old turnip,
All for my jimmy old nose.
So here I come meddle, come mend your old kettle,
Come mend an old kettle all round.
With my rink-a-tink tink, and a sup more drink,
I'll make your old kettle cry sound,
Sound, sound!
I'll make your old kettle cry sound.

"I am a jovial tinker,
I've travelled both far and near.
And I never did meet with a singer
Without he could drink some beer!
And it's then with a friend we'll a merry life spend,
Which I never did yet, I vow,
With my rink-a-tink tink, and a sup more drink,
I'll make your old kettles cry sound,
Sound, sound!
I'll make your old kettles cry sound!"

"Budget, a leathern bag. Fr. bougette, dim. of Fr. bouge. See Budge .... Budge (2), a kind of fur. Budge is lambskin with the hair dressed outwards; orig. simply 'skin.' Fr. bouge, a wallet, great pouch. Lat. bulga, a little bag, a word of Gaulish origin. Gal. bolg, balg, a bag; orig., a skin; see Bag."—Skeat, Concise Etymological Dictionary. Budget, a bag for tools, is still used in Staffordshire.

"Tom Tinker's my true love, and I am his dear,
And I will go with him, his budget to bear."[1]

  1. Stale news is called in north-east Shropshire, "tinker's news."