Page:The Folk-Lore Journal Volume 7 1889.djvu/266

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search
This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.
242
DORSETSHIRE CHILDREN’S GAMES, ETC.

This is continued through the following rounds:

“Not Ragged-and-tough,
 Nor Huckem-a-buff, first cousin, &c.
 Nor Miss Grizzle, maiden-aunt, &c.
 But Goody Gherkin, grandmamma to Miss Grizzle, &c.

“Not Ragged-and-tough,
 Nor Huckem-a-buff, first cousin, &c.
 Nor Miss Grizzle, maiden-aunt, &c.
 Nor Goody Gberkin, grandmamma, &c.
 But little Snap, favourite dog of Goody Gherkin, grandmamma, &c.

“Not Ragged-and-tough,
 Nor Huckem-a-buff, first cousin, &c.
 Nor Miss Grizzle, maiden-aunt, &c.
 Nor Goody Gherkin, grandmamma, &c.
 Nor little Snap, favourite dog, &c.
 But the Whip that tickled the tail of little Snap,
 Favourite dog of Goody Gherkin,
 Grandmamma of Miss Grizzle,
 Maiden-aunt of Huckem-a-buff,
 First cousin to Ragged-and-tough.”

Each person, in turn, has to repeat this jingle, gradually increasing in length, going backwards through the list, a new character being introduced each round; so that by the time the last lines have been reached, some one’s memory is sure to become confused and a mistake be made in the repetition, for which, amidst general laughter, a forfeit is claimed.

Another form the game would sometimes take was that of a “word puzzle,” when an outlandish single word, or curiously involved sentence, had to be repeated so many times (seven or nine was the usual number) without a mistake, on failure of which a forfeit was exacted.

The following is a specimen of such a word:

“Aldibirondifosdiforniosdikos.”

And this of a sentence:

“Of all the saws I ever saw saw, I never saw a saw saw as that saw saws.”
      (To make this intelligible the tool “saw” should be understood.)