Page:The Folk-Lore Journal Volume 7 1889.djvu/269

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245
DORSETSHIRE CHILDREN’S GAMES, ETC.

Neither am I aware that it was used at any particular time, though no doubt this kind of game-rhyme or forfeits would prevail more largely at Christmas time than at any other. At the last reference I stated that I had had the music or score of the refrain or burden of the song or low chant (as it almost sounded on the piano) given me in MS. together with two versions of the libretto, which varied in detail from those given by Mr. Boase and Miss Busk. These latter I now reproduce, adding in brackets the words where one version differs from the other.

First voice :

“Come and I will sing to you.”

Second voice :

“What will you sing to me?”

First voice :

“I will sing you one-o.”

Second voice :

“What may [will] your one-o be?”

First voice :

“One and one are [is] all alone,
 And evermore shall be so.”

These lines are repeated at the commencement of every verse, with the alteration of “one-o” into “two-o,” &c., &c., and as each succeeding verse is reached, the preceding ones are gone through again until the twelfth and last is arrived at. Then the whole song or carol becomes complete as follows:

“Twelve are the twelve apostles.
 Eleven and eleven go to heaven.
 [Eleven the eleven that went to heaven.]
 Ten are the ten commandments.
 Nine and nine are the brightest shine [so bright that shine].
 Eight are [the] Gabriel angels [gable-rangers].
 Seven are the seven stars in the sky.
 Six are the six bold waiters.
 [The other version is wanting here.]
 Rive are the flamboys [framboises] under the brow [bough].
 Four are [the] gospel preachers.
 Three of them are drivers [thrivers].
 Two of them are little [lily] white babes,
 A-clothed all in green-o.
 One and one are [is] all alone,
 And evermore shall be so.”

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