Page:The Folk-Lore Journal Volume 7 1889.djvu/333

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tABULATION OF FOLKTALES. 5\

and Mongoose Story (root). Pentamerone, i. 7. Pitre, No. IL Polyidos resuscitates Glaukos (grass). Samdijana (iourhcvhs used by Ilanuman, the monkey deity), see Talboy Wheeler's History of India, ii. 368. Kiviere, Contes Poj). Kahyles, p. 199 (herb). Tuscan Fairy Tales, No. 9, p. 93, '* The Glass CoflSn." Vermieux, The Hermit of Motu Jhurna (2nd ed.), pp. 101, 102. Volsunga-Sag'a (Camelot Series), p. 22. Wide-Awalie Stories, p. 417, note.

The Gypsy word for remedy, medicine, is drah, i.e. grass (also used for poison).

(For life-giving ointment), cf, Asbjornsen and Moe, No. 35. Bernoni, Puntate, iii. p. 84. Campbell, i. p. 218. Comparetti, No. 32. Crane, Italian Popular Tales, pp. 23, 335. Dasent, Norse Tales, pp. 18, 183, 321, 357. (Comp. Day, Folktales of Bengal, pp. 135, 219). Gonzenbach, Sicilian- ische Mdrchen, No. 40. Indian Antiquary, iii. 9. Kalevala, Schiefner's Translation, 1852, pp. 80, 81 (honey). Ralston, Russian FolMales, pp. 231, 232. See also Sagas from the Far Fast, pp. 75, ]10 (life-restoring cordial).

(For healing mud), cf. Dublin Magazioie, 1868, p. 356, "Right is always Right." Magyar Folktales, pp. 36, 152, 323, 336. (Comp. Temple, Legends of the Punjab, 155, 214, 215, 358, 415, 456, 484.) Vernaleken, " The Accursed Garden," p. 308. Wide-Awake Stories, 247, 248, 295.

(For Resuscitations), cf. American Folklore Journal, i. 213, 214; ii. 137. Bahdr-i-Ddnush, ii. 290 (Scott's translation). Bleek, Hottentot Fables, p. 76 ; Reynard the Fox in South Africa, p. 55. Callaway, Zulu Tales, pp. 54, 211, 231. Campbell, ii. 287, 437, et. seq. Castren, Fthnologische Vorlesun- gen, etc. p. 174. Clodd, Myths and Dreams, p. 196. Clouston, Poinilar Tales and Fictions, ii. 407 ff. Cox, Aryan Mythology, i. 234, 375; ii. ^^^. Crane, Italian Poimlar Tales, p. 78. Dasent, Norse Tales, pp. 10, 59, 105, 357, 439 ; Tales from the Fjeld, p. 289, " Golden Palace that hung in Air." Day, Lai Behari, Folktales of Bengal, "Life's Secret," and No. 20; and pp. 224 ff., 266, 267, 277, 504. Decisions of the Princess Thoo-DJiamma Tsari, No. 10. Deulin, Contes de Ma Mere V Oye, p. 178, (Legend of Ste. Trip- hime). DWrbiney Papyras, " The Two Brothers." Ezekiel xxxvii. 1-10. Folklore Record, iv. 104, 152 ; v. 5, 6. Folklore Journal, vi. 58-59, 137, 138, 177. Fortnightly Review, 1869, "The Worship of Plants and Animals." Grey, Polyn. Mythology, pp. 116, 124, 185. Grimm, Household Tales, Nos. 6, 16, 26, 46, 47, 60, 97, and note, vol. ii. p. 399 ; Teutonic Mythology, i. 185, note. Gfyjisy Lore Society Journal, i. 29. Hahn, OriecMsche Mdrchen, " Sun, Moon, and Morning Star." Holy Grail Legends. Indian Antiquary, i. 119 ; iv. 262. Kalevala (Lem- minkainen reanimated). Katha-sarit-sagara, ch. 59. Keating, chap. x. Tuatlia de Dannaan Saga, see MaUnogion, Guest, p. 390. Magyar Folktales, p. 374. Mallet, North. Ant., pp. 105, 436 (Prose Edda). Medea's spell. Comp. Muhammadan legend of Isa, son of Maryam (= Jesus), also found in Gospels of Pseudo-Matthew and the Infancy. Old Deccan Days, " Punchkin," " Chundum Rajah," " Sodewa Bai." Osiris

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