Page:The Folk-Lore Journal Volume 7 1889.djvu/367

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279
THE WITCH.

(C) Man.

If one gets the "first word" of a witch, or of one having an "ill fit," or any supernatural being bent on evil, all power to injure is taken away. J— R—, a farmer in Strathdon, was returning home one wild stormy night in winter. When he came to a place called Dabrossach, he saw a creature that looked like a child cross the road in front of him. He at once cried out, "Peer (poor) thing! Ye're far fae hame in sic a stormy nicht." The creature disappeared. The farmer was convinced that mischief was intended to be done to him. (Told by Mr. Michie, Strathdon.)

Take a silver pin, conceal it between the finger and thumb of the left hand, contrive in some way to meet the witch in the morning "atween the sin (sun) an the sky," pass her on the right side, in passing draw blood from above the eyes with the pin; keep the pin covered with the blood, and the witch has no power over you. (J. Farquharson, Corgarff.)


II.

How to find out the Witch.

1. Put a quantity of new pins into a pot, and as much of the milk of the cow which is under the spell as can be drawn from her over the pins. Place the pot with its contents over the fire, and let them simmer, but not boil. The one that has wrought the evil, if an opportunity can be snatched, will go to the house and take the pot off the fire. (Peathill, Pitsligo.)

2. When a cow's milk failed, and the work of a witch was suspected, a pair of the "gueedeman's breeks" was put over the cow's horns. She then made straight for the house of the witch and lowed at the door. (Strathdon.)