Page:The Folk-Lore Journal Volume 7 1889.djvu/37

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29
THE LONDON BALLADS.

"In stooping down to cut the cords round,
Sing, 'Turn your back on me;'"
And with all the strength this lady had
She pushed him right into the sea, sea, sea,
She pushed him right into the sea.


"Help me out, my pretty fair miss,
O help me out," said he;
"And we'll go down to the Catholic church,
And married we will be, be, be,
And married we will be."


"Lie there, lie there, you false-hearted man.
Lie there, lie there!" said she,
"For its nine of the king's daughters you've drowned here,
But the tenth one's drowned thee, thee, thee,
But the tenth one's drowned thee."


She mounted on the milk-white steed,
And led the iron grey;
And when she got to her own father's house,
It was three hours and a-half till day, day, day,
It was three hours and a-half till day.


While she was walking in the room,
Which caused the parrot to wake,
Said he, "What's the matter, my pretty fair miss,
That you're up so long before day, day, day,
That you're up so long before day?"


"Hush up! hush up! my pretty little parrot,
Don't tell no tales on me;
Your cage shall be lined with sweet may gold.
And the doors of ivorie."


While they were talking all of this,
Which caused the old man to wake,
Said, "What's the matter, my pretty little parrot,
That you chatter so long before day, day, day,
That you chatter so long before day?


"The cat she sprung against my cage,
And surely frightened me,
And I called for the pretty fair miss
To drive the cat away, way, way,
To drive the cat away."