Page:The Iliad of Homer (Butler).djvu/134

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114
[ILIAD
A TRUCE IS AGREED UPON

anew, till heaven decide between us and give victory to one or to the other."

398They all held their peace, but presently Diomed of the loud war-cry spoke, saying, "Let there be no taking, neither treasure, nor yet Helen, for even a child may see that the doom of the Trojans is at hand."

403The sons of the Achæans shouted applause at the words that Diomed had spoken, and thereon King Agamemnon said to Idæus, "Idæus, you have heard the answer the Achæans make you—and I with them. But as concerning the dead, I give you leave to burn them, for when men are once dead there should be no grudging them the rites of fire. Let Jove the mighty husband of Juno be witness to this covenant."

412As he spoke he upheld his sceptre in the sight of all the gods, and Idæus went back to the strong city of Ilius. The Trojans and Dardanians were gathered in council waiting his return; when he came, he stood in their midst and delivered his message. As soon as they heard it they set about their twofold labour, some to gather the corpses, and others to bring in wood. The Argives on their part also hastened from their ships, some to gather the corpses, and others to bring in wood.

421The sun was beginning to beat upon the fields, fresh risen into the vault of heaven from the slow still currents of deep Oceanus, when the two armies met. They could hardly recognise their dead, but they washed the clotted gore from off them, shed tears over them, and lifted them upon their waggons. Priam had forbidden the Trojans to wail aloud, so they heaped their dead sadly and silently upon the pyre, and having burned them went back to the city of Ilius. The Achæans in like manner heaped their dead sadly and silently on the pyre, and having burned them went back to their ships.

433Now in the twilight when it was not yet dawn, chosen bands of the Achæans were gathered round the pyre and built one barrow that was raised in common for all, and