Page:The Intrusion of Jimmy.djvu/21

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11
JIMMY MAKES A BET

"A good dinner," interpolated Raikes, softly.

"A good dinner," said Jimmy. "Very well. How long do you give me, Arthur?"

"How long do you want?"

"There ought to be a time-limit," said Raikes. "It seems to me that a flyer like Jimmy ought to be able to manage it at short notice. Why not to-night? Nice, fine night. If Jimmy doesn't crack a crib to-night, it's up to him. That suit you, Jimmy?"

"Perfectly."

Willett interposed. Willett had been endeavoring to drown his sorrows all the evening, and the fact was a little noticeable in his speech.

"See here," he said, "how's J-Jimmy going to prove he's done it?"

"Personally, I can take his word," said Mifflin.

"That be h-hanged for a tale. Wha-what's to prevent him saying he's done it, whether he has or not?"

The Strollers looked uncomfortable. Nevertheless, it was Jimmy's affair.

"Why, you'd get your dinner in any case," said Jimmy. "A dinner from any host would smell as sweet."

Willett persisted with muddled obstinacy.

"Thash—thash not point. It's principle of thing. Have thish thing square and 'bove board, I say. Thash what I say."

"And very creditable to you being able to say it,"