Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 1.djvu/93

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53
REPLY TO SOME VERSES OF J. M. B. PIGOT, ESQ.

As ye pass by the tomb,
Where my ashes consume,
Oh! moisten their dust with a Tear.


12.

May no marble bestow
The splendour of woe,
Which the children of Vanity rear;
No fiction of fame
Shall blazon my name,
All I ask, all I wish, is a Tear.

October 26, 1806.[1]


REPLY TO SOME VERSES OF J. M. B. PIGOT, ESQ., ON THE CRUELTY OF HIS MISTRESS.[2]

1.

Why, Pigot, complain
Of this damsel's disdain,
Why thus in despair do you fret?
For months you may try,
Yet, believe me, a sigh[3]
Will never obtain a coquette.


  1. Byron, October 26, 1806.—[4to]
  2. [The letters "C. B. F.  J. B. M." are added, in a lady's hand, in the annotated copy of P. on V. Occasions, p. 14 (British Museum).]
  3. But believe me.—[4to]