Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 2.djvu/105

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CANTO I.]
71
CHILDE HAROLD’S PILGRIMAGE.

LXXVIII.

Foiled, bleeding, breathless, furious to the last,
Full in the centre stands the Bull at bay,
Mid wounds, and clinging darts, and lances brast,[1]
And foes disabled in the brutal fray:
And now the Matadores[2] around him play,
Shake the red cloak, and poise the ready brand:
Once more through all he bursts his thundering way—
Vain rage! the mantle quits the conynge hand,
Wraps his fierce eye—'tis past—he sinks upon the sand![3]


LXXIX.

Where his vast neck just mingles with the spine,
Sheathed in his form the deadly weapon lies.
He stops—he starts—disdaining to decline:
Slowly he falls, amidst triumphant cries,
Without a groan, without a struggle dies.
The decorated car appears—on high

The corse is piled—sweet sight for vulgar eyes——[4][5]
  1. ["Brast" for "burst" is found in Spenser (Faërie Queene, i. 9. 21. 7), and is still current in Lancashire dialect. See Lanc. Gloss. (E. D. S. "brast").]
  2. [One bull-fight, one matador. In describing the last act Byron confuses the chulos or cloak-waving footmen, who had already played their part, with the single champion, the matador, who is about to administer the coup de grâce.]
  3. —— he lies along the sand.—[MS. erased.]
  4. The trophy corse is reared—disgusting prize.
    or, The corse is reared—sparkling the chariot flies.—[MS. M.]
  5. [Compare Virgil, Æneid, viii. 264—

    "Pedibusque informe cadaver
    Protrahitur. Nequeunt expleri corda tuendo—"]