Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 2.djvu/175

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CANTO II.]
141
CHILDE HAROLD’S PILGRIMAGE.

LXV.

Fierce are Albania's children, yet they lack
Not virtues, were those virtues more mature.
Where is the foe that ever saw their back?
Who can so well the toil of War endure?
Their native fastnesses not more secure
Than they in doubtful time of troublous need:
Their wrath how deadly! but their friendship sure,
When Gratitude or Valour bids them bleed,
Unshaken rushing on where'er their Chief may lead.


LXVI.

Childe Harold saw them in their Chieftain's tower
Thronging to War in splendour and success;
And after viewed them, when, within their power,
Himself awhile the victim of distress;
That saddening hour when bad men hotlier press:
But these did shelter him beneath their roof,
When less barbarians would have cheered him less,
And fellow-countrymen have stood aloof—N27
In aught that tries the heart, how few withstand the proof!


LXVII.

It chanced that adverse winds once drove his bark

Full on the coast of Suli's shaggy shore,[1]
  1. [The travellers left Janina on November 3, and reached Prevesa November 7. At midday November 9 they set sail