Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 2.djvu/203

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CANTO II.]
169
CHILDE HAROLD’S PILGRIMAGE.

as far as Sunium (now Cape Colonna),[1] till he accompanied

us in our second excursion. However, his works, as far as
  1. In all Attica, if we except Athens itself and Marathon, there is no scene more interesting than Cape Colonna.[a] To the antiquary and artist, sixteen columns are an inexhaustible source of observation and design; to the philosopher, the supposed scene of some of Plato's conversations will not be unwelcome; and the traveller will be struck with the beauty of the prospect over "Isles that crown the Ægean deep:" but, for an Englishman, Colonna has yet an additional interest, as the actual spot of Falconer's[b] shipwreck. Pallas and Plato are forgotten in the recollection of Falconer and Campbell:—

    "Here in the dead of night, by Lonna's steep,[c]
    The seaman's cry was heard along the deep."

    This temple of Minerva may be seen at sea from a great distance. In two journeys which I made, and one voyage to Cape Colonna, the view from either side, by land, was less striking than the approach from the isles. In our second land excursion, we had a narrow escape from a party of Mainotes, concealed in the caverns beneath. We were told afterwards, by one of their prisoners, subsequently ransomed, that they were deterred from attacking us by the appearance of my two Albanians: conjecturing very sagaciously, but falsely, that we had a complete guard of these Arnaouts at hand, they remained stationary, and thus saved our party, which was too small to have opposed any effectual