Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 2.djvu/257

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CANTO III.]
223
CHILDE HAROLD’S PILGRIMAGE.

Harold, once more within the vortex, rolled
On with the giddy circle, chasing Time,
Yet with a nobler aim than in his Youth's fond prime.[1][2]


XII.

But soon he knew himself the most unfit[3]
Of men to herd with Man, with whom he held
Little in common; untaught to submit
His thoughts to others, though his soul was quelled
In youth by his own thoughts; still uncompelled,
He would not yield dominion of his mind
To Spirits against whom his own rebelled,
Proud though in desolation—which could find
A life within itself, to breathe without mankind.


XIII.

Where rose the mountains, there to him were friends;[4]

Where rolled the ocean, thereon was his home;
  1. Yet with a steadier step than in his earlier time.—[MS. erased].
  2. [Compare Manfred, act ii. sc. 2, lines 50-58—

    "From my youth upwards
    My spirit walked not with the souls of men,
    Nor looked upon the earth with human eyes;

    ·····

    My joys, my griefs, my passions, and my powers
    Made me a stranger; though I wore the form,
    I had no sympathy with breathing flesh."

    Compare, too, with stanzas xiii., xiv., ibid., lines 58-72.]

  3. Fool he not to know.—[MS. erased.]
  4. Where there were mountains there for him were friends.
    Where there was Ocean—there he was at home
    .—[MS.]