Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 2.djvu/26

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xx
xx
NOTES ON THE MSS. OF CHILDE HAROLD.
lxxxvi. "Oh! ever loving, lovely, and beloved!"—
lxxxvii. "Then must I plunge again into the crowd,"—
lxxxviii. "What is the worst of woes that wait on Age?"—


Additions to the Seventh Edition, 1814.

The Second Canto, in the first six editions, numbers eighty-eight stanzas; in the Seventh Edition the Second Canto numbers ninety-eight stanzas.


Additions.

The Dedication, To Ianthe.

Stanza xxvii. "More blest the life of godly Eremite,"—
lxxvii. "The city won for Allah from the Giaour,"—
lxxviii. "Yet mark their mirth, ere Lenten days begin,"—
lxxix. "And whose more rife with merriment than thine,"—
lxxx. "Loud was the lightsome tumult on the shore,"—
lxxxi. "Glanced many a light Caique along the foam,"—
lxxxii. "But, midst the throng in merry masquerade,"—
lxxxiii. "This must he feel, the true-born son of Greece,"—
lxxxix. "The Sun, the soil—but not the slave, the same,"—
xc. "The flying Mede, his shaftless broken bow,"—