Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 2.djvu/323

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CANTO III.]
287
CHILDE HAROLD’S PILGRIMAGE.

CXIV.

I have not loved the World, nor the World me,—
But let us part fair foes; I do believe,
Though I have found them not, that there may be
Words which are things,—hopes which will not deceive,
And Virtues which are merciful, nor weave
Snares for the failing; I would also deem
O'er others' griefs that some sincerely grieve—[1]N24
That two, or one, are almost what they seem,—
That Goodness is no name—and Happiness no dream.


CXV.[2]

My daughter! with thy name this song begun!
My daughter! with thy name thus much shall end!—
I see thee not—I hear thee not—but none
Can be so wrapt in thee; Thou art the Friend
To whom the shadows of far years extend:
Albeit my brow thou never should'st behold,
My voice shall with thy future visions blend,
And reach into thy heart,—when mine is cold,—
A token and a tone, even from thy father's mould.


  1. O'er misery unmixedly some grieve.—[MS.]
  2. [Byron was at first in some doubt whether he should or should not publish the "concluding stanzas of Childe Harold (those to my daughter);" but in a letter to Murray, October 9, 1816, he reminds him of his later determination to publish them with "the rest of the Canto."]