Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 2.djvu/436

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394
[CANTO IV.
CHILDE HAROLD’S PILGRIMAGE.

Thee more than mortal? and that so supine
By aught than Romans Rome should thus be laid?[1]
She who was named Eternal, and arrayed
Her warriors but to conquer—she who veiled
Earth with her haughty shadow, and displayed,[2]
Until the o'er-canopied horizon failed,
Her rushing wings—Oh! she who was Almighty hailed!


LXXXV.

Sylla was first of victors; but our own,[3]
The sagest of usurpers, Cromwell!—he
Too swept off senates while he hewed the throne
Down to a block—immortal rebel! See
What crimes it costs to be a moment free,
And famous through all ages! but beneath
His fate the moral lurks of destiny;
His day of double victory and death
Beheld him win two realms, and, happier, yield his breath.[4]


  1. ——how supine
    Into such dust deserted Rome should fade
    ,
    or, In self-woven sackcloth Rome should thus be laid.—[MS. M. erased.]

  2. The Earth beneath her shadow and displayed
    Her wings as with the horizon and was hailed
    ,
    or, The rushings of his wings and was Almighty hailed.—[MS. M. erased.]

  3. Sylla supreme of Victors—save our own
    The ablest of Usurpers—Cromwell—he
    Who swept off Senates—while he hewed the Throne
    Down to a block—immortal Villain! See
    What crimes, etc
    .—[MS. M.]

  4. On the 3rd of September Cromwell gained the victory of