Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 2.djvu/63

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CANTO I.]
29
CHILDE HAROLD’S PILGRIMAGE.

And when they on their father call,
What answer shall she make?'—
"Enough, enough, my yeoman good,[1]
Thy grief let none gainsay;
But I, who am of lighter mood,
Will laugh to flee away.


8.

"For who would trust the seeming sighs[2]
Of wife or paramour?
Fresh feeres will dry the bright blue eyes
We late saw streaming o'er.
For pleasures past I do not grieve,
Nor perils gathering near;
My greatest grief is that I leave
No thing that claims a tear.[3]


  1. Enough, enough, my yeoman good,
    All this is well to say;
    But if I in thy sandals stood
    I'd laugh to get away.—[MS. erased, D.]

  2. For who would trust a paramour
    Or e'en a wedded feere
    Though her blue eyes were streaming o'er.
    And torn her yellow hair?—[MS.]

  3. ["I leave England without regret—I shall return to it without pleasure. I am like Adam, the first convict sentenced to transportation, but I have no Eve, and have eaten no apple but what was sour as a crab" (letter to F. Hodgson, Falmouth, June 25, 1809, Letters, 1898, i. 230). If this Confessio Amantis, with which compare the "Stanzas to a Lady, on leaving England," is to be accepted as bonâ fide, he leaves England heart-whole, but for the bitter memory of Mary Chaworth.]