Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 2.djvu/78

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44
[CANTO I.
CHILDE HAROLD’S PILGRIMAGE.

Lordlings and freres—ill-sorted fry I ween!
But here the Babylonian Whore hath built
A dome, where flaunts she in such glorious sheen,
That men forget the blood which she hath spilt,
And bow the knee to Pomp that loves to varnish guilt.


XXX.

O'er vales that teem with fruits, romantic hills,
(Oh, that such hills upheld a freeborn race!)
Whereon to gaze the eye with joyaunce fills,
Childe Harold wends through many a pleasant place.[1]
Though sluggards deem it but a foolish chase,
And marvel men should quit their easy chair,
The toilsome way, and long, long league to trace,
Oh! there is sweetness in the mountain air,
And Life, that bloated Ease can never hope to share.


XXXI.

More bleak to view the hills at length recede,
And, less luxuriant, smoother vales extend:[2]
Immense horizon—bounded plains succeed!
Far as the eye discerns, withouten end,
Spain's realms appear whereon her shepherds tend
Flocks, whose rich fleece right well the trader knows—
Now must the Pastor's arm his lambs defend:
For Spain is compassed by unyielding foes,
And all must shield their all, or share Subjection's woes.


  1. Childe Burun ——.—[MS.]
  2. Less swoln with culture soon the vales extend
    And long horizon-bounded realms appear.—[MS. erased.]