Page:Tlingit Myths and Texts.djvu/14

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PHONETIC KEY a a longer and shorter forms of the Continental a, like a in far a as in. fall A as in final; a close approximation to u in cut e e longer and shorter forms of the Continental e, like a in fate 6 as in bell I i longer and shorter forms of the Continental i, like ee in street i as in hit 6 o longer and shorter forms of English o, as inflow u as in rule u as in put u barely formed o and u sounds; rather qualities of the preceding consonant sounds than independent vowels q the velar &, not found in English g the velar g corresponding to the preceding, not found in English y a sound similar to but deeper than the preceding, pronounced by the younger Indians almost like English y x the velar spirant, pronounced like Spanish j or German ch x the palatal spirant, often mistaken for h c like English sh in short dz as in adze is as in sits dj like English j and dg in judge tc like English ch in church L not found in English, but resembling a rapid pronunciation of t and I, or of k and I L not found in English, but resembling a rapid pronunciation of d and / I a spirant belonging to the same series as the preceding; not found in English though often represented by thl or hi t, d, n, s, k, g, h, w, y approximate the sounds for which they stand in English though the agreement is by no means absolute t!, s!, ts!, tc!, L!, k!, q! are similar to t, s, ts, tc, /, , q, but are accompanied by a catch in the breath which sometimes gives the impression of a pause, and sometimes sounds like a sharp click k ! when k! is pronounced very far forward in the mouth it is sometimes set off in this way, but the distinction between the two sounds is by no means clear Labials are found only in a few words of foreign origin