Page:Two Treatises of Government.djvu/48

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34
Of Government.

ſingly, excluſive of the reſt that ſhould be in the world with him, is againſt both ſcripture and all reaſon : and it cannot poſſibly be made ſenſe, if man in the former part of the verſe do not ſignify the ſame with them in the latter ; only man there, as is uſual, is taken for the ſpecies, and them the individuals of that ſpecies : and we have a reaſon in the very text. God makes him in his own image, after his own likeneſs; makes him an intellectual creature, and ſo capable of dominion: for wherein ſoever elſe the image of God conſiſted, the intellectual nature was certainly a part of it, and belonged to the whole ſpecies, and enabled them to have dominion over the inferior creatures ; and therefore David ſays in the 8 th Pſalm above cited, Thou haſt made him little lower than the angels, thou haft made him to have dominion. It is not of Adam king David ſpeaks here, for verſe 4. it is plain, it is of man, and the ſon of man, of the ſpecies of mankind.

§. 31. And that this grant ſpoken to Adam was made to him, and the whole ſpecies of man, is clear from our author's own proof out of the Pſalmiſt. The earth, ſaith the Pſalmiſt, hath he given to the children of men ; which ſhews the title comes from fatherhood. Theſe are Sir Robert's words in the preface before cited, and a ſtrange inference it is he makes; God hath given the earth to the children of men, ergo the title comes from fatherhood. It is

pity