Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 1.djvu/503

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search
This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.

How collector may demand duties on stills.Sec. 16. And be it further enacted, That a personal demand of the proprietor or proprietors of any still, of the duties due, or a notice in writing of the amount thereof left at his dwelling by the collector, shall have all the effect of a demand made, as required by the twenty-third section of the act, intituled “An act repealing after the last day of June next, the duties heretofore laid upon distilled spirits imported from abroad, and laying others in their stead; and also upon spirits distilled within the United States, and for appropriating the same.1791, ch. 15.

And certain fines, &c. may be mitigated or remitted.Sec. 17. And be it further enacted, That all fines, penalties, and forfeitures, which shall have been incurred by force of any present or future law of the United States for the laying, levying and collecting of any duties or taxes, other than duties on goods, wares and merchandise imported, and on the tonnage of ships and vessels, shall and may be mitigated or remitted, by the like ways and means, and upon and under the like conditions, regulations and restrictions, as are contained, prescribed, authorized and directed, in and by the act, intituled 1790, ch. 12.An act to provide for mitigating or remitting the forfeitures and penalties accruing under the revenue laws in certain cases therein mentioned,” touching fines, penalties, and forfeitures incurred or accruing in relation to the cases therein mentioned; which act, and every clause, matter and thing therein contained, shall be of like force and effect, for the mitigating or remitting of fines, penalties and forfeitures, which shall have been incurred in reference to the said other duties and taxes, as if the same were repeated and re-enacted, in the several and respective laws for laying, levying and collecting the said other duties and taxes.

How state judicial courts may obtain mitigation of fines, &c.Sec. 18. And be it further enacted, That the judicial courts of the several states, to whom, by this act, a jurisdiction is given, shall and may exercise all and every power, in the cases cognizable before them, for the purpose of obtaining a mitigation or remission of any fine, penalty or forfeiture, which may be exercised by the judges of the district courts, in cases depending before them: The said state courts first causing reasonable notice to be given to the person or persons claiming such fine, penalty or forfeiture, and to the attorney, who may, under warrant from the attorney of the district, prosecute, for the United States, in such court, that each may have an opportunity of showing cause against the mitigation or remission thereof.

Provisions of certain act extended for recovery of penalties, &c. under this.Sec. 19. And be it further enacted, That the act, intituled “An act repealing, after the last day of June next, the duties heretofore laid upon distilled spirits imported from abroad, and laying others in their stead, and also upon spirits distilled within the United States, and for appropriating the same;” and the act, intituled “An act concerning the duties on spirits distilled in the United States,”1791, ch. 15.
1792, ch. 32.
shall extend to, and be in full force, for the recovery and distribution of the penalties and forfeitures herein contained, and, generally, for the execution of this act, as fully and effectually, as if every regulation, restriction, penalty, provision, clause, matter and thing, therein contained, were inserted in, and reenacted by this present act, subject only to the alterations hereby made.

Approved, June 5, 1794.

Statute Ⅰ.



June 5, 1794
Chap. Ⅼ.—An Act in addition to the act for the punishment of certain crimes against the United States.[1]


Act of April 30, 1790, ch. 9.
Act of April 24, 1800, ch. 35.
 
Section 1. Be it enacted and declared by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That if any citizen of the United States shall, within the territory or


  1. Illegal outfit of vessels in the ports of the United States.—Where a vessel had been built in New York for the purpose of employing her in a war with England, if a war had broken out, and was afterwards sold to a French citizen, who used her as a privateer, the Supreme Court refused to hear counsel