Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 108 Part 4.djvu/286

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108 STAT. 2920 PUBLIC LAW 103-337—OCT. 5, 1994 SEC. 1508. SENSE OF CONGRESS CONCERNING INDEFINrrE EXTENSION OF NUCLEAR NON-PROLIFERATION TREATY. (a) FINDINGS. —Congress makes the following findings: (1) The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, signed at Washington, D.C., London, and Moscow on July 1, 1968, is the centerpiece of global efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons. (2) The United States has demonstrated longstanding support for that treaty and related efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons. (3) President Clinton has declared that preventing the spread of nuclear weapons is one of the highest priorities of his Administration, (4) In April 1995, the parties to the Treaty on the Non- Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons will convene a conference in New York City to discuss the indefinite extension of the treaty. (5) The policy of the President is to seek at that conference i the indefinite and imconditional extension of that treaty. > (b) SENSE OF CONGRESS. —I t is the sense of Congress that— (1) the President has the full support of Congress in seeking the indefinite and unconditional extension of the Treaty on the Non-Prohferation of Nuclear Weapons; (2) the President, when formulating and implementing other elements of nonproliferation policy of the United States (including United States counterproliferation doctrine, the Nuclear Posture Review, and nuclear testing policy), should take into account the objectives of the United States at the 1995 conference of the parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons; and (3) the President and the President's senior national security advisers should dedicate themselves to ensuring the indefinite and unconditional extension of the Treaty on the Non- Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons at the 1995 conference for that treaty. SEC. 1509. NEGOTIATION OF LIMITATIONS ON NUCLEAR WEAPONS TESTING. (a) FINDINGS.— Congress makes the following findings: (1) On January 25, 1994, the United States and 37 other nations began negotiations for a comprehensive treaty to ban permanently all nuclear weapons testing. (2) On March 14, 1994, the President extended the current United States moratorium on nuclear weapons testing through September 1995. (3) The United States is seeking to extend indefinitely the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons at the conference of the parties to the Treaty to be held in New York City in April 1995. (4) Conclusion of a comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty ^ could contribute toward successful negotiations to extend the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. (5) Agreements to eliminate nuclear weapons testing sind to control the spread of nuclear weapons could contribute to the national security of the United States, its allies, and other nations around the world.