Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 29.djvu/881

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
This page needs to be proofread.

PROTOCOL—JAPAN. N ovmunnn 22, 1894. 855 Protocol between the United Staten of America and the Empire of Japoxn P¤**¤¤·>1· to regulate certain special matter: of mutual concern, apart from the treaty of commerce and navigation of November 22, 1894, between the two Governments. Ooncluded at Washington November 2.2, 1894; proclaimed March 21, 1895. _ By run Pnnsmnur or run Umrnn Srnns or Annmcn. - A PROCLAMATION. Whereas, a Protocol between the United States of America and the Empire of Japan to regulate certain special matters of mutual concern, apart from the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation of November 22, 1894, between the same High Contracting Parties, was concluded and signed by their respective Plenipotentiaries, on the 22d day of November, 1894, which Protocol, being in the English language, is word for word as follows: ° PROTOCOL. The Government of the United States of America\and the Government of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, deeming it advisable in the interests of both countries to regulate certain special matters of mutual concern, apart from the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation signed this day, have, through their respective Plenipotentiaries, agreed upon the following stipulations:-— I. It is agreed by the Contracting Parties that one month after the T¤r!¤”i¤·T¤r•¤· exchange of the ratitications of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation signed this day the Import Tariff now in operation in Japan in respect of goods and merchandise imported into Japan by citizens of the United States shall cease to be binding. From the same date the General Statutory Tariff of Japan shall, subject to the provisions of Article IX of the Treaty of March 31, 1854, at present snbsisting between the Contracting Parties, so long as said Treaty remains in force, and, thereafter, subject to the provisions of Article I V and Article XIV of the Treaty signed this day, be applicable to goods and merchandise being the growth, produce or manufacture of the Territories of the United States upon importation into J spun. But nothing contained in this Protocol shall be held to limit or qualify m}]t¤r»¤•¤i~>¤¤ vwthe right of the Japanese Government to restrict or to prohibit the ‘°°"‘ importation of adulterated drugs, medicines, food or beverages; indecent or obscene prints, paintings, books, cards, lithographic or other engravings, photographs or any other indecent or obscene articles; articles in violation of the patent. trade-mark or copy—right laws of Japan; or any other article which for sanitary reasons, or in view of _ public security or morals, might offer any danger. 2. The Japanese Government, pending the opening of the countryto Fg*¤¤¤i¤¤.¤f pus citizens of the United States, agrees to extend the existing passport p" '”‘°“"" J"‘P"" system in such a manner as to allow citizens of the United States, on the production of a certificate of recommendation from the Representative of the United States at Tokio, or irom any of the Consnls of the United States at the open ports of Japan, to obtain upon application passports available for any part of the country and for any period not exceeding twelve months, from the Imperial Japanese Foreign Office