Page:VCH Warwickshire 1.djvu/396

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A HISTORY OF WARWICKSHIRE In this manor the monks of S. Nicholas [of Angers] have 2 ploughs, and 22 villeins (vil- lanos) and 6 bordars with 5 ploughs. The whole was worth 100 shillings, and afterwards 40 shillings ; now 10 pounds. Lewin held it freely. The same G(eoffrey) holds NEWEBOLD [New- bold-on-Avon]. 1 There are 8 hides. There is land for 16 ploughs. In the demesne are 3, and 2 serfs ; and (there are) 25 villeins and 8 bordars with n ploughs. It was and is worth 100 shillings. Lewin held it freely. The same G(eoffrey) holds FENINIWEBOLD [Newbold Revel]. 2 There are 8 hides. There is land for 16 ploughs. In the de- mesne are 4 ploughs and 8 serfs ; and (there are) 26 villeins and 3 bordars with 10 ploughs. There are i o acres of meadow. It was and is worth 7 pounds. Lewin held it freely. IN MERETON [MARTON] HUNDRET The same G(eoffrey) holds 5 hides in LELLE- FORD [Long Lawford]. 3 There is land for 14 ploughs. In the demesne is I ; and 14 villeins and 7 bordars have 7 ploughs. There is a mill worth (de) 14 shillings. It was worth 40 shillings ; now 50 shillings. The same G(eoffrey) holds WAPEBERIE [Wappenbury]. 4 There are 5 hides. There 1 This is Dugdale's identification, and I think it is correct, though his logic is not convincing. Otherwise we must suppose that Newbold-on-Avon, the most important of the Newbolds, was omitted from Domesday Book. See next note. 2 This also is Dugdale's identification, and prob- ably correct. Indeed, if, as he states (p. 56), this manor was conveyed in 6 Richard II. by the name of 'Feni-Newbold,' there can be no question but that he is right. Otherwise, this entry looks suspiciously like a repetition of the account of Newebold preceding it, with the less important particulars slightly varied. In the Subsidy Roll of i Edward III. Newbold Revel appears under the head of ' Newbolde and Strettone,' with John Revel first on the list of those who paid. 3 I have little doubt of this identification, pro- viding that Dugdale (p. 21) is correct in stating that it was in this Lawford that Geoffrey de Wirce granted the tithes to the monastery of S. Nicholas of Angers. In I Edward III., Long Lawford, was in Brinklow Leet, and Church Lawford in Marton Leet: but as Long Lawford was originally in the parish of Church Lawford, it was doubtless also originally in Marton Leet and in the Domesday Hundred of ' Meretone.' 4 This identification is obvious. Moreover it is afterward found in Marton Leet, and was there- is land for 15 ploughs. In the demesne are 3 ploughs and 6 serfs ; and (there are) 1 9 vil- leins and 6 bordars with 10 ploughs. There is a mill worth (de) 6 shillings and 8 pence. Wood(land) half a league long and 2 fur- longs broad. It was and is worth no shil- lings. The same G(eoffrey) holds HANTONE B [Hampton in Arden]. 8 There are 10 hides. There is land for 22 ploughs. In the demesne are 2, and 2 serfs, and 2 bond-women ; and 50 villeins with a priest and 16 bordars have 13 ploughs. There is a mill worth (de) 40 pence and i o acres of meadow. Wood(land) 3 leagues long and 3 broad. It was and is worth 100 shillings. From the same G(eoffrey), Sot (Sotus) holds SCOTESCOTE [Shustoke]. 7 There are 4 hides. There is land for 8 ploughs. In the demesne is I plough and 3 serfs ; and (there are) I O vil- leins with 3 ploughs. There are 16 acres of meadow. Wood(land) i league long and half a league broad. It was and is worth 40 shil- lings. From G(eoffrey), Ansgot the priest holds I hide in BENECHELIE [Bentley] 8 in almoin. There is land for 2 ploughs, and they are there with 4 villeins. Wood(land) half a league long and 3 furlongs broad. It was and is worth 64 pence. From G(eofFrey), Bruno holds 2 hides in GAURA [Brownsover]. 9 There is land for 2 ploughs, and they are there, with 4 villeins and 3 bordars and 2 serfs (servis). There are 2 acres of meadow. It was and is worth 20 shillings. fore doubtless, like the preceding place, in the Domesday Hundred of ' Meretone.' 6 Between this and the preceding entry there is a space left in the MS. for ' Coleshelle ' Hundred to be inserted. 6 This is also an obvious identification, and Dugdale (p. 696) makes clear the subsequent over- lordship of the Mowbrays, who succeeded to Geoffrey de Wirce. Hampton in Arden, after- wards in Hemlingford Hundred, was doubtless in the Domesday Hundred of ' Coleshelle.' 7 Shustoke. Exactly the same remarks apply to this identification. 8 Bentley was of course, like Shustoke, in ' Coles- helle' Hundred. The 'c ' was, as often, a mistake for ' t.' 8 This place no doubt took its name from the Domesday tenant Bruno. See note on p. 309 and also the next note. 336