Page:Weird Tales volume 31 number 02.djvu/129

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WEIRD TALES
NEXT MONTH


Dreadful Sleep


By Jack Williamson

A marvelous tale is this new serial novel by the author of "The Wand of Doom" and "Golden Blood." It is a story of weird monstrosities from Saturn, that lay buried under the antarctic ice since prehistoric times, chained in a dreadful slumber–the story of their ghastly awakening, and the doom that oppressed the world–the story of the weird and glorious being, Maru-Mora, and the lovely Carol Lee–the story of a great scientist mad with power.
This is a romantic story, a thrilling story, a tragic story. Those of you who remember "Golden Blood" by the same author will not want to miss this new tale from his pen. It will begin
in the March issue of


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amateur astronomer myself and I know those heavenly bodies cited by friend Lovecraft well."


Breath-taking Beauty

James O'Regan writes from Springfield, Missouri: "Your new feature by Virgil Finlay will undoubtedly be lauded by your readers. His first illustration, of Sterling's superb passage, is genuinely horrible; yet there is a breath-taking beauty about it. Vampiric illustrations are common, but never have I seen one quite so startling as Virgil's. Words cannot describe my feeling when I saw that lovely, loathsome creature slinking by the grave-stones. The whirling fog and wheeling bats added a distinct touch of horror. One of my friends chanced to see the illustration, and he became a trifle upset. But this is quite understandable. I can't say how I enjoyed The Black Stone Statue by Mary E. Counselman. The repellent horror in the story was excellently depicted, and Finlay's drawing was splendid. I have enjoyed every issue of WT since I first became a reader of your magazine. The type of stories I prefer are those with some fearful terror lurking in every page. I gloat over slimy, bestial things, spawned in some dank, unknown place. I thrill over evil, creeping creatures of the dark, inhabitants of a crumbling tomb. Perhaps my taste is just a bit too shuddery, but there are many other readers with the same preferences."


A Splendid Piece of Fantasy

B. M. Reynolds writes from North Adams, Massachusetts: "Mr. Nictzin Dyalhis certainly turned out a splendid piece of fantastic writing in The Sea-Witch. The theory of reincarnation is a particularly fascinating subject, one which, I believe, should appeal to a great majority of your readers. Many fine tales in the past have been written around this theme. This story was well constructed and well written. The characters were portrayed vividly, seeming almost to step out of the pages to become real living and breathing human beings. Mr. Dyalhis likewise showed a keen knowledge of the Æsir and Norse mythology in general which made a convincing background for the tale. Second best was H. P. L.'s little fantasy, Polaris, one of the finest short-shorts this year. Third: Miss Counselman's The Black Stone Statue–unusual theme, nicely done. The Voyage