Portland, Oregon: Its History and Builders/Volume 2

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Portland, Oregon: Its History and Builders (1911)
by Joseph Gaston
Volume 2
1770230Portland, Oregon: Its History and Builders — Volume 21911Joseph Gaston

PORTLAND

OREGON



ITS HISTORY AND BUILDERS

IN CONNECTION WITH

THE ANTECEDENT EXPLORATIONS, DISCOVERIES. AND MOVEMENTS OF THE PIONEERS THAT SELECTED THE SITE FOR THE

GREAT CITY OF THE PACIFIC


By JOSEPH GASTON


Illustrated


VOLUME II



CHICAGO — PORTLAND

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING CO.

1911

RUFUS MALLORY

BIOGRAPHICAL


HON. RUFUS MALLORY.

Occupying a position of distinctive preferment as a representative of the Oregon bar, connected with the work of the courts both as a jurist and attorney, Hon. Rufus Mallory has also taken part in the work of framing the laws of the state and thus has left his impress deeply upon the history of Portland and of Oregon. A native of New York, he was born in Coventry, Chenango county, June lo, 1831. The ancestral history of the family in America traces back to Peter Mallory, who in 1643 braved the dangers of an ocean voyage at that day to become identified with the colonial interests of New Haven, Connecticut. Among his descendants was David Mallory, who was born in Connecticut, where he spent his entire life, and who during the period of the Revolutionary war joined a regiment of Connecticut troops to battle for the independence of the colonists. His service won recognition in the gift of a land warrant, which was afterward located by his grandson. Samuel Mallory, son of David Mallory, was born in Oxford, Connecticut, August 9, 1782, and in early life settled at Coventry, New York. Subsequently he became a resident of Allegany county, that state, and later of Steuben county. He followed farming throughout his entire life save for a brief period devoted to seafaring. He died at Greenwood, New York, August 19, 1854, in the faith of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he had long been a devoted member. He married Lucretia Davis, who was a native of Oxford, Connecticut, and also passed away in Greenwood. Her father. Colonel John Davis, was born in New York and was of Welsh descent. He valiantly espoused the cause of the colonists in the Revolutionary war and his bravery and military skill won him promotion to the rank of colonel. He was likewise prominent in the community in which he lived and, in fact, was held in such honor among those with whom he was constantly associated that the anniversary of his birth is still celebrated at High Rock Grove, where he made his home. Unto Samuel and Lucretia Mallory were born nine children: Augustus, who made his home at Heppner, Oregon; Mrs. Maria Slocum, who was also a resident of Heppner; Mrs. Hallock and Mrs. Abigail Wallace, who also lived there; Homer H., of New York; and Rufus, of Portland; George, deceased; Lucius Belvidere; and Sarah, who died in Pennsvlvania.

In his boyhood days Rufus Mallory was a pupil in the district schools of Allegany and Steuben counties. New York, and afterward profited by instruction in Alfred University. At the age of sixteen he began teaching school and thereafter for some time divided his time between teaching and attending school. Taking up the study of law with a view of making its practice his life work, he has since eagerly availed himself of any opportunity that would promote his progress in that field, and in his practice has been of able and conscientious service to his clients and has long been recognized as a faithful minister in the temple of justice.

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GEORGE H. WILLIAMS

In 1850 Judge Williams was married to Miss Kate Van Atwerp, a daughter of General Verplank Van Atwerp. They had one daughter, Ellen, who cared for her father in his declining years. Mrs. Williams died in July, 1863, and some years later Judge Williams married Mrs. Kate George, a daughter of Ross B. Hughes, of Iowa, also now deceased. There were two adopted children of this marriage: Mrs. Carl Harbaugh, who resides in Seattle, Washington; and Theodore Williams, a student in Oregon State University.

Judge Williams sat upon the bench until 1852. There came further recognition of his ability as a jurist in 1853, when he received presidential appointment as chief justice of the territory of Oregon, to which office he was reappointed by President Buchanan in 1857. From that time until his demise, covering a period of fifty-seven years, he remained a resident of Oregon and his sound judgment and active labors were effective forces in shaping the policy and molding the destiny of the state. He was chosen a member of the constitutional convention which drafted the first organic law of Oregon and acted as chairman of the judiciary committee of that body. While in the convention he vigorously opposed the introduction of slavery in Oregon and before the instrument was presented to the voters made an active canvass in behalf of the anti-slavery clause therein. Grave problems which are ever to the statesman and the thinking man of wide import received his earnest attention and he took an advanced stand upon many questions which in the course of years have received public endorsement and become elements in our national growth and progress. In 1860 he became one of the founders of the Union party and subsequently canvassed the country for Lincoln and did everything in his power to awaken sympathy and support for the Union cause. He was a member of the United States senate at the most critical period in the country's history, having been elected in 1864, and it is a matter of record that his services during that vital epoch were in line with the policy which in its consummation was productive of such splendid results. He was appointed to serve on the committees on finance and public lands and on the reconstruction committee, and all questions which came up for consideration received his earnest attention, and his support or opposition thereto was the expression of conscientiously and carefully considered opinions.

A contemporary biographer has thus given the history of his senatorial service: "Among the measures which he was instrumental in bringing before the senate and which became laws are the following: The Military Reconstruction Act, under which the insurrectionary states were reorganized and their representation admitted to congress; an act creating a new land district in Oregon, with a land office at La Grande; an amendment to the act granting lands to the state of Oregon for the construction of a military road from Eugene to the eastern boundary of the state, granting odd sections to supply any deficiency in the original grant; various acts establishing post roads; a general law to secure the election of United States senators; the 'tenure of office act' vetoed by President Johnson, but passed over his veto; numerous appropriations for Oregon; an amendment to the act of 1861 relative to property lost in suppressing Indian hostilities in Oregon; an amendment to the judiciary act of 1789; an amendment to the act granting lands to aid in the construction of a railroad from the Central Pacific in California to Portland, Oregon; an act to pay two companies of Oregon volunteers commanded by Captains Walker and Olney; an act to strengthen the public credit; an amendment to the act granting lands to aid in the construction of a railroad from the Central Pacific to Portland, by which the grant was prevented from reverting to the government; an act granting lands to aid in the construction of a railroad and telegraph line from Portland to Astoria and McMinnville; a resolution to facilitate the building of a light-house at Yaquina Bay, and other light-houses on the Oregon coast; an act granting certain lands to Blessington Rutledge, a citizen Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/20 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/21 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/22

C. A. DOLPH

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H. W. CORBETT

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Pleasantly situated in his home life, Mr. Corbett was married in Albany, New York, to Miss Caroline E. Jagger, who was born in that city and there passed away in 1865, leaving two sons, Henry J. and Hamilton F., both of whom died in Portland in early manhood. It was in Worcester, Massachusetts, that Mr. Corbett wedded Miss Emma L. Ruggles, a native of that state.

Few men have more fully realized the obligations of wealth or met their responsibilities in a more creditable manner. He was deeply interested in and a generous supporter of the Boys and Girls Aid Society, which endeavored to secure arrangements whereby children guilty of a first crime should not be thrown among hardened criminals. The home was built especially for such first offenders and its influence has been most beneficial. Mr. Corbett's private benevolences were many and, in fact, no good work done in the name of charity or religion sought his aid in vain. He never allowed the acquirement of wealth to warp his kindly nature, but remained throughout life a genial, courteous gentleman, appreciative of social amenities and generously bestowing warm regard in recognition of true personal worth. Many enterprises of Portland today stand as monuments to his life work, but a more fitting and even more lasting tribute to him is the cherished memory which his friends entertain for him.



GUSTAVUS C. MOSER.

Gustavus C. Moser, a practitioner at the Portland bar since the 1st of June, 1894, was born in Alma, Wisconsin, on the 15th of November, 1870, a son of Fred and Anna Moser, both of whom were natives of Switzerland. Following their marriage they took up their abode in the city of Berne but after a short period crossed the Atlantic to the new world, becoming residents of Wisconsin. The father is still living at Alma where for a long period he engaged in the dairy business, retiring, however, a few years ago. Plis wife died when their son Gustavus was but sixteen years of age.

In the pursuit of his education Gustavus C. Moser completed the work in successive grades and the high school of Mondovi, Wisconsin, and later continued his studies in the Northern Indiana Normal College at Valparaiso. In the interim between his high school course and his college course he engaged in teaching in the district school for three winters in Wisconsin, and during the summer time accepted an agency position. In this way he earned the money that enabled him to enter college. He did not graduate at Valparaiso, however, because illness depleted his funds. Attracted toward a professional career, he studied for and was admitted to the bar in Oregon on the 1st of June, 1894. He had become a resident of this state in 1891 and has since been closely identified with the interests and the upbuilding of the northwest. Following his admission to the bar, he at once opened a law office in Portland and in the intervening period of sixteen years has made substantial progress in his profession. With a nature that cannot be content with mediocrity, he has closely applied himself to the mastery of legal principles, often intricate and involved, and his clear and cogent reasoning and forceful presentation of his cases indicate his careful and thorough preparation. On the 1st of July, 1904, he became chief deputy district attorney for the fourth judicial district of Oregon and continued to fill the position until the 1st of January, 1908, when he resigned.

On the 20th of July. 1898, Mr. Moser was married to Miss Sara Meta Keats, a daughter of Thomas Keats. She was born in Toronto, Canada, and engaged in teaching there before coming to Portland. She also taught in the public schools of this city for several years before her marriage. She is a distant relative of the poet Keats.

Both Mr. and Mrs. Moser hold membership in the First Christian church and he is identified with several fraternal and social organizations. He is prominent in the Knights of Pythias, in which order he was grand chancellor for Oregon from June, 1908, until June, 1909. He is also a past exalted ruler of Portland Lodge, No. 142, B. P. O. E., having served from April 1909 until April 1910. He is a life member of the Multnomah Amateur Athletic Club, the Commercial Club and several other organizations of like character. He served for three years in the Oregon National Guard as a noncommissioned officer. He has always been a stalwart republican, interested in the success of the party and doing all that he can to further its success. His ambition, however, is not in the line of office seeking. He has some real-estate and mining investments which are paying good returns, but his time and attention are chiefly given to his law practice and in a profession demanding keen intellectuality and individual merit he is making continuous progress.



HENRY LEWIS PITTOCK.

Henry Lewis Pittock, who for half a century has been identified with Portland, as managing owner and publisher of the Oregonian, is known for the impress that his life has made upon the pages of its history. Quiet and unostentatious, he has ever sought to keep his personality in the back ground, but as the man behind the paper which for over fifty years has led public thought and voices its sentiments, anticipated the public needs and fostered every movement for the development of the city during the entire period of its growth from a mere village to a metropolis, has been associated to some extent with its every thought and action since its infancy, his career is inseparably linked with that of Portland and the influence that his character has had upon the moulding of its history can hardly be appreciated.

Mr. Pittock was born in London, England, March i, 1836, a son of Frederick and Susanna (Bonner) Pittock, both natives of Kent county. His father first came to America in 1825, with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Pittock, who emigrated from Dover, Kent county, England, and established their home in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Frederick Pittock later went to London, where he learned the printer's trade and was married but returned to Pittsburg in 1839 and spent the remainder of his life in that city, engaged principally in the printing business. Henry Lewis Pittock was the third in a family of eight children, of whom five are yet living. A brother, Robert Pittock, formerly of Portland, died in San Diego, California, three years ago. Another brother, John W. Pittock, was the founder of the Pittsburg (Penn.) Leader.

In the public schools of Pittsburg, Mr. Pittock received his early education and later attended the preparatory school of the University of Western Pennsylvania. His father being a printer, he learned something of the trade while working in his office in Pittsburg and was attracted to Portland by letters written to the Pittsburg papers by members from the missionary colony founded in Oregon by the United Presbyterian church. He decided to seek his fortune in the new country, and in the summer of 1853, at the age of seventeen years, he and his elder brother, Robert, joined an emigrant party for the Pacific coast. At Malheur river they separated, the brother going to Eugene, while Henry Pittock came to Portland. He attempted to get work in the different newspaper offices of the city but failed. After looking for employment for several days without success he refused a position as assistant bar tender at the Columbia Hotel because it afTorded no possibilities of a career. In the latter part of October he was offered a situation by Thomas J. Dryer, proprietor of the

H. L. PITTOCK

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every energetic and forceful man in a community hears enough ; of commenda- tion very little. "When such a man has lived his three score and ten and his twilight shadows lengthen, it is proper to record a just estimate of him. Henry Pittock has the finest perception of a newspaper's relation to its readers and to the common- wealth whose voice it is. No one within or without the field of journalism in Oregon could have a nicer sense of a newspaper's duties to the public. From the time, fifty years ago, when the daily Oregonian was a doubtful enterprise, financially a weakling and its roots barely set, until to-day when it is rich beyond its founder's dreams, influential and powerful — Henry Pittock lent it freely and generously to every cause that made for material and spiritual advancement. In the early days of his paper and after it had been firmly established, he encoun- tered very strong and at times, unscruplous opposition, backed by practically unlimited money. Almost alone and unaided he defeated every combination that was made to kill oft" his paper. He carried it at various times, through three crises that would have unner'ed, if indeed they would not have bank- rupted an ordinary man. Always imperturbable, he seemed calmer in great stress than under ordinary conditions. He is fair minded. He weighs men and things judicially. Slow in his judgment, having formed it, he never wavers. "His success was due largely to his acute knowledge of the value of news. During the Civil war his expenditures for telegrams, considering the income of his paper, were enormous. The policy he inaugurated of securing important news at any cost, has prevailed to this day. After all is said, the Oregonian is the biggest institution in Oregon. Mr. Pittock laid its foundations and for fifty years upbuilded, hand in hand with its great editor. He has created his own monument." ARTHUR CHAMPLIN SPENCER. Arthur Champlin Spencer, a member of the Portland bar who is now acting as attorney for the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company, was born at Suffield, Connecticut, October 17, 1872, his parents being George Francis and Martha (Champlin) Spencer. He pursued his early education in the public schools of Deep River, Connecticut, passing through consecutive grades to his graduation from high school at that place with the class of June, 18S9. His more specifically literary course was received in the Connecticut Literary Institution at Suffield, Connecticut, and in the Vermont Academy at Saxton's River, Vermont, com- pleting the course in the latter institution in June, 1891. Mr. Spencer made his initial step in the business world as a clerk in a general merchandise store at Deep River, and after being thus employed for a time, be- gan clerking in the Deep River National Bank. He came to the west in 1893 and after thorough preparation for the bar, his studies being pursued in the University of Oregon, he was admitted to practice before the Oregon courts in June, 1895. He has since followed this calling in Portland and while advancement at the bar is proverbially slow, no dreary novitiate awaited him. He soon became estab- lished in a successful law practice that has connected him with much important litigation work in the courts and he was deputy district attorney for the fourth judicial district of Oregon from 1900 until 1904. He never fails to give a thor- ough preparation and his close and careful analysis of a case enables him to as- semble his points with regard to their due relative value, never for a moment losing sight of the important point upon which the decision of every case finally depends. After engaging- for several years in general practice he was appointed six years ago as attorney for the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company which he now represents in a legal capacity. I Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/39 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/40

HARVEY W. SCOTT

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J. P. O'BRIEN
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JOSIAH FAILING
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D. W. WAKEFIELD

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twenty years, attracted by the favorable reports which he heard concerning the opportunities in this country. He did not hold the idea, however, that wealth might be had for the asking and find that he was pinning his faith to a fallacy ; he knew that indefatigable energy' and unfaltering enterprise must constitute the basis of business advancement in this countn,- as in his native land and as the years have gone by, his earnest and intelligent efforts have enabled him to make steady progress, achieving success in the various fields in which he has la- bored until now he occupies a prominent position in connection with real-estate and the general brokerage business and sustains an unassailable reputation by rea- son of the salient characteristics of his business activity.


HENRY FAILING.

There came to Henry Failing during the course of his active and honorable life many expressions of public regard and approval but none that indicated more clearly the attitude of Portland's citizens toward him than his election to the mayoralty for a second term with only five dissenting votes. He remained through the period of his residence here a high type of American manhood and chivalry, the simple weight of this character and ability carrying him into prominence. His public record and his private life are alike untarnished by any dishonor or lack of fidelity to duty. His achievements were notable and he wrote his name upon the hearts of his friends in characters that time will never efface. The width of the continent separated Henry Failing during the period of his residence in Portland from the place of his nativity, for he was born in the city of New York, January 17, 1834. His parents were Josiah and Henrietta (Ellison) Failing, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this volume.

At the usual age Henry Failing began his education, being sent to a school then under the control of the New York Public School Society, an organization which has long ceased to exist, the management of the schools being now merged into the general system of the board of education. Although the curriculum was not very broad, the methods of instruction were thorough. Henry Failing continued to attend school until April, 1846, when he made his initial step in the business world by entering the counting house of L. F. de Figanere & Company in Piatt street as an office boy. The senior partner was a brother of the Portuguese minister to the United States, while Mr. Rosat, another mem- ber of the firm, was a French merchant from Bordeaux. The house had among its patrons many French dealers in the city and while connected with that estab- lishment Mr. Failing learned to both speak and write the French language with facility and correctness. He also made rapid progress in business, working his way upward until he became an expert accountant, while later he became junior bookkeeper in the large dry-goods jobbing house of Eno, Mahoney & Company, the senior partner being Amos R. Eno, a New York millionaire, who after- ward told an intimate friend that it was one of the mistakes of his life that he did not make it more of an inducement for Henry Failing to remain with him. However, an uninterrupted friendship continued between the two men until Mr. Eno's death. Mr. Failing's knowledge of the importing business and custom house firms and dealers was such that the two concerns with which he was connected had no occasion for the services of a broker while he was associated with them. He wisely used his opportunities to gain a knowledge of business methods and in 1851,' when little more than seventeen years of age, he was better equipped for his future business career than many young men who have far wider advantages and educational opportunities.

HENRY FAILING

The 15th of April, 1851, was an important day in the life of Mr. Failing,

for it was on that day, with his father and a younger brother, John W. Failing, that he left New York to become a resident of Oregon. They sailed for Chagres on the isthmus of Panama and proceeded by boat up the river of the same name and thence to Panama by mule train. On the western coast of the isthmus they took passage on the steamer Tennessee, which in due time took them to San Francisco, and on the 9th of June they arrived in Portland as passengers on the old steamer Columbia, which was then one of the fleet of the Pacific Steam- ship Company. A fellow passenger on that trip was C. H. Lewis, late treasurer of the water committee, and for many years Mr. Failing and Mr. Lewns together annually observed the anniversary of their arrival in this city.

The following year brought a great many people to Portland, but in 185 1 the city was a small village, its only advantage apparently being its position on the river, bringing it into close connection with the sea. Father and son began the building of a store room on Front street, one door south of Oak, and in the course of time their little stock of goods was installed there and they were meeting the demands of the public in the lines of their trade. The father at once took an active part in municipal and educational affairs, was chosen a member of the first city council in 1852 and the following year was elected mayor of Portland. He retired from active connection with the business in 1854 and Henry Failing then conducted the store under his own name. With the growth of the city he increased his stock and extended his business connections until he was recognized as one of the most important factors in the commercial and financial circles of the city.

On the 21st of October, 1858, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Failing and Miss Emily Phelps Corbett, the youngest sister of Hon. H. W. Corbett, formerly of this city. The death of Mrs. Failing occurred in Portland, July 8, 1870. She was survived by three of her four daughters, namely: Henrietta E., Mary F. and Mrs. Henry C. Cabell, whose husband, Captain Cabell, is a member of the United States army.

It was in the year 1869 that Henry Failing entered into active connections with the financial interests of the city. He joined with his father, Josiah Failing, and the Hon. H. W. Corbett in purchasing a controlling interest in the First National Bank of Portland from A. M. and L. M. Starr, who in 1866 had been prominent in the establishment of the bank. From 1869 until his death Henry Failing served as president of the institution, and his careful guidance, executive ability and keen discrimination were salient features in the conduct of the establishment, which became one of magnitude. He had no sooner assumed charge than the captial stock was increased from one hundred thousand to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, and in 1880 the latter sum was doubled, the bank being capitalized for five hundred thousand dollars, while the legal surplus and undivided profits amounted to more than the capital. Year after year extensive dividends were paid to the stockholders and the bank became recognized as one of the most prominent financial enterprises on the coast. In January, 1871, Mr. Failing and Mr. Corbett consolidated their mercantile enterprises, forming the firm of Corbett, Failing & Company, which maintained an existence for twenty-two years and was then succeeded in the ownership by the firm of Corbett, Failing & Robertson.

Something of the cosmopolitan nature of the interests of Mr. Failing is indicated in the fact that not only was he one of the most distinguished and capable merchants and bankers of Portland but was also equally active in his efforts in behalf of political, intellectual and moral progress. He believed it the duty as well as the privilege of every American citizen to support through political activity and by his ballot the measures that he deemed most beneficial to the community and to the country at large. His position was never a matter of doubt. He stood loyally for what he believed to be right and advocated a policy which he believed to be both practical and progressive. He was made chairman of the state central committee of the Union party, a combination of republicans and war democrats, who in 1862 carried Oregon for the Union. Two years later, when thirty years of age, he was chosen mayor of Portland and his administration constituted an era of development, improvement and reform in connection with Portland's affairs. During his first administration a new city charter was obtained, a system of street improvements adopted and much good work was done. So uniform was the endorsement of his first term that at his reelection there were only five dissenting votes. In 1873 he was chosen for a third term and as chief executive of the city he advocated and supported much municipal legislation which is still felt in its beneficial effects in Portland. In 1885 he became a member of the water committee and when that committee was organized was unanimously chosen chairman, thus serving until his death. He was never bitterly aggressive in politics nor indulged in person- alities. He believed in the principles which he advocated and, therefore, sup- ported them, but he allowed to each the right to individual opinion. His marvel- ous judgment and powers of exact calculation are well illustrated by his service as chairman of the water committee. For many years he, substantially unaided, annually made the estimates required by law of the receipts and expenditures of the committee for the year next ensuing. These estimates are, under the varied circumstances necessarily considered in making them, characteristic of him, and some of them are marvels of exactness. His estimate of the cost of operation, maintenance, repairs and interest for the year 1893 was one hundred thousand dollars and the actual outlay was one hundred thousand, two hundred and eleven dollars and ninety-one cents. His estimate of receipts for the year 1892 was two hundred and forty thousand dollars, and the receipts actually collected were two hundred, thirty-seven thousand, three hundred dollars and eighty-five cents. His estimate of the receipts for the year 1897 was two hundred and thirty-two thousand dollars. The amount actually collected was two hundred, thirty-one thousand, eight hundred and sixty dollars and ninety-five cents. The magnitude of the task of making these estimates is emphasized when the fact is considered that not only the fluctuations in the population of a large city must be considered but climatic conditions anticipated, and the amount of water consumed in irrigation based thereon ; the amount of building and the volume of trade considered, and an estimate made of the water con- sumed in building and in the use of elevators. These various sources of revenue were all carefully considered and estimates made w-hich were in excess of the actual income in but trifling amounts.

Not only in the field of politics did Mr. Failing put forth effort that had direct bearing upon the welfare of Portland, for in many other ways his labors were of equal value. No good work done in the name of charity or religion sought his cooperation in vain. He gave freely and generously of his means and of his time to support beneficial public projects. Chosen a regent of the Uni- versity of Oregon, he was made president of the board and so continued until his death, which occurred November 8, 1898. He was also a trustee and treas- urer of the Pacific University, the oldest educational institution of the state. Ha was a generous contributor to and active worker in the First Baptist church of Portland and the Baptist Society, of which he long served as president. He was the treasurer of the Children's Home and his heart and hand reached out in ready .sympathy and aid to all who needed assistance. He was associated with William S. Ladd and H. W. Corbett in purchasing and laying out the grounds of Riverside cemetery and the beautiful city of the dead is, as it were, a monument to his efi^orts in that direction. He labored earnestly and effectively for the Portland Library Association, of which he was president, and his benevolence and enterprise largely made possible the erection of the library building. Coming to Portland in pioneer times, he lived for forty-seven years to witness its growth and upbuilding. No duty devolving upon him was neglected and no opportunity to aid his city was passed by headlessly. He was still serving as a member of the water commission at the time of his death and that committee prepared a lengthy memorial in his honor. In every home of the city where he was known — and his acquaintance was wide — the news of his demise was received with sorrow and regret. He had attached himself closely to his fellow townsmen not only by reason of his public activities but by those personal qualities which win warm regard and enduring friendship. He was a man of fine personal appearance — an index of the larger life and broader spirit within.


SUMNER J. BARBER, D. D. S.

Dr. Sumner J. Barber, successfully engaged in the practice of dentistry in Portland, was born in Potsdam, New York, October 24, 1841. He is descended from Thomas Barber, who came from England in 1635 and settled in Massachusetts. He served in the Pequot Indian war of 1637. His descendants are scattered all over the United States and the information comes from one of the name in Boston, Massachusetts, that his investigations show that there are more than forty thousand descendants of Thomas Barber alive at this date. Ira S. Barber, the father, was born March 4, 1806, and died December 24, 1876. He had for only a few brief months survived his wife, Mary (Wright) Barber, who was born May 4, 1806, and passed away on the lOth of March, 1876. Dr. Barber supplemented his early education by study in the Canton Academy at Canton, New York, completing his literary course by graduation with the class of 1862. A review of the field of business, with the object of selecting a line which he wished to make his life work, led him to determine upon the prac- tice of dentistry, and with this end in view he entered the Philadelphia Dental College, where he pursued the regular course to his graduation in 1870. Win- ning the degree of D.D.S., he at once entered upon practice, and steady, hard work has constituted the basis of the success which he has attained. In the meantime he had rendered active service to his country in the Civil war. In early manhood he became a member of Company K, One Hundred Six New York Volunteers, with which command he participated in the campaign of West Virginia. He was also with the army of the Potomac at Shenandoah, and in all of the battles fought after the spring of 1863, and was in the front when Lee surrendered. At the battle of Cedar Creek he rode twice as far as did General Sheridan in the line of his duty. Twice he was struck by pieces of shell, once at the battle of the Wilderness and again at Monocacy, but was not seri- ously wounded. He remained continuously with his command during the last three years of the war and made an excellent military record by his unswerving loyalty. It was after the war that Dr. Barber took up the study of dentistry, in which field he has now practiced for four decades, his ability gaining him wide recog- nition in a liberal and extended patronage. He has been a resident of Port- land since 1875 and ranks here with the able representatives of the dental science, having continuously kept abreast with the onward march of the profession as experience, research and investigation have broadened the knowledge and pro- moted the efficiency of its followers. On the 29th of August, 1873, in Rochester, New York, Dr. Barber was united in marriage to Miss Ellen G. Barton, a daughter of William and Abiah Barton anrl a descendant of one of the first missionaries of northern New York. Their children are : Alice, the wife of Louis R. Alderman ; Lieutenant John R. Barber, A.B.. U. S. medical corps; Fannie L. Barber, A.B. ; Alvin B. Barber, U. S. engineer ; Joseph L. Barber, A.B. ; and Helen D. Barber. That the Doctor is a believer in higher education is indicated by the excellent opportunities which he has afforded his children in that direction, and the family

record is one which reflects credit upon his name. His religious faith is indiPage:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/78
J. W. COOK
Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/81 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/82 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/83 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/84 J. C. AINSWORTH Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/87 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/88 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/89 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/90 E. B. WATSON Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/93 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/94 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/95 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/96 HENRY W. GOODE Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/99 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/100 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/101 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/102 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/103 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/104 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/105 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/106 C. U. GANTENBEIN Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/109 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/110 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/111 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/112 CICERO H. LEWIS Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/115 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/116 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/117 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/118

EARL C. BRONAUGH Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/121 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/122 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/123 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/124

DR. J. C. HAWTHORNE Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/127 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/128 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/129 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/130 JACOB KAJIM Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/133 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/135 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/136 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/137 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/138 SYLVESTER FARRELL Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/141 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/142 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/143 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/144
GEORGE H. HIMES
Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/147 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/148 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/149 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/150 SOLOMON HIRSCH Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/153 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/154 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/155 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/156 J. E. HASELTINE Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/159 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/160 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/161 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/162 ADDISON C. GIBBS Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/165 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/166 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/167 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/168 J. m. STROWBRIDGE Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/171 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/172 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/173 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/174 J. A. STROWBRIDGE Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/179 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/180 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/181 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/182 FRED W. MULKEY Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/185 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/186 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/187 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/188 EARL C. BRONAUGH, SR. Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/191 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/192 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/193 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/194

GUY W. TALBOT

Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/197 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/198 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/199 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/200 D. P. THOMPSON Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/203 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/204 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/205 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/206

J. W. GOING Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/209 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/210 been a director of the Multnomah Law Library and through much of this period has served as its president. Deeply interested in the cause of education, he has labored earnestly to promote the interests of his alma mater and to this end accepted the position of secretary of its finance committee and also became a director of the university. He was at one time president of his alumni association, and he has been vice president of the Portland free kindergarten. His labors have been most effective as a champion of education and he has done much to secure the adoption of high ideals in that field. Aside from his efforts for educational progress and his activity in the field of law practice, he has served as a director of the Columbia & Northwestern Railway extending between the town of Lyle and Klickitat in the state of Washington.

Mr. Smith was married in Washington county, Oregon, in 1881, to Miss Alice Sweek, a native of that county antl a daughter of John and Maria Sweek, who in 1852 came from Missouri to Oregon. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are parents of three children, Ruth, Josephine and Marion. Theirs is a hospitable home and the center of a cultured society circle.

Mr. Smith belongs to the Arlington and the University Clubs and also holds membership with the State Bar Association. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and, while he has never been a politician in the sense of office-seeking, he keeps in touch with the issues of the day and is abreast with the best thinking men of the age on sociological and economic ques- tions. His opinions are never hastily formed but are rather the conclusion of deep consideration and earnest thought so that in matters of public concern as well as in the law he is able to give wise and valuable counsel. He is a man of earnest purpose, inflexible in his adherence to what he believes to be right and yet he accords to others the same privilege of honest opinion.


EDWARD ARTHUR BALDWIN.

Edward Arthur Baldwin, a Yale and Columbia man, utilizing his powers in the successful conduct of real-estate interests, which have proven of general as well as individual profit, was born in Princeton, Illinois, June 27, 1868, his parents being Charles and Louisa (McArdle) Baldwin. His father, who for many years was a prominent practicing attorney of Princeton, for some time served as a member of the house of representatives in the Illinois legislature. He died in 1881 and was for five years survived by his wife, who passed away in 1886.

After attending the public schools until he had completed the work of the high school, E. A. Baldwin pursued his studies in Phillips Academy at Andover, Massachusetts. He took a classical course in Yale University and then entered the Columbia University Law School of New York city, graduating with the class of 1889. For five years thereafter he engaged in the practice of law in the eastern metropolis, but, believing that the opportunities of the west were greater for a young man who must establish his place in business, he traveled to the coast country, spending some time in Montana and British Columbia, after which he came to Portland in 1900. Here as an operator in real estate he has remained in business continuously since, and his careful investments, his active promotion of building and real-estate projects have brought him a meas- ure of success that enables him now to live practically retired, giving his at- tention largely to the control of his own properties. He erected the Medical building at the corner of Park and Alder streets in connection with F. O. Down- ing and is also the owner of the Sargent Hotel on the east side.

On the 15th of June, 1900, Mr. Baldwin was married to Miss Grace Booth, of New Haven, Connecticut, a daughter of Theodore and Ellen (Anderson)

Booth, the former a wholesale lumber dealer. Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin are memPage:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/212 DR. RODNEY GLISAN Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/215 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/216 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/217 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/218

DR. A. S. NICHOLS Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/221 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/222 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/223 served to prove his ability as a lawyer and he was accorded an extensive clientage. It was found that he was able to cross swords in forensic combat with the ablest lawyers of the northwest, that his preparation of cases was thorough and his presentation sound and logical. Again he was called to the bench when, in 1862, he was elected judge 01 Multnomah county and his services received endorsement the following spring in his reelection.

After retiring from office Judge Marquam refused to take an active interest in politics, concentrating his energies upon his real-estate investments and the management of his property interests. With remarkable prescience he foresaw the growth of Portland, realizing that eventually a large city would spring up here because of the natural advantages caused by its waterways and the fact that it lay in a most rich and productive section of the state. Feeling sure that its commercial and industrial prominence would in time make it a city of metropolitan proportions, and that the property would in consequence continuously increase in value, he purchased real-estate from time to time in Portland and its suburbs and still owns much valuable property here. At one time he became the owner of two hundred and ninety-eight acres known as jMarquam's Hill, constituting one of the most beautiful districts and attractive building sites in the city of Portland. He has since disposed of much of this large tract and his own home still stands upon a portion of it, surrounded by a beautiful lawn. The sale of his property lias brought to him a substantial and gratifying financial return. On the 8th of May, 1853, Mr. Marquam was married to Miss Emma Kern, and unto them were born eleven children, four sons and seven daughters. Mr. Marquam's delight in his success has largely come from the fact that it has enabled him to provide liberally for his family. His political allegiance has ever been given to the republican party and its principles have found in him a stalwart advocate. He has ever been loyal to its interests but has never sacrificed the public weal to partisanship nor the interests of his constituents to self aggrandizement. He has now passed the eighty-eighth milestone on life's journey and his are "the blessed accompaniments of age—honor, riches, troops of friends."

CLINTON KELLY.

Clinton Kelly was born in the wilds of Kentucky and grew up as rugged as his native mountains. Reared amid hardships, his labor-scarred hand grasped tha hand of the humblest toiler and caled him brother. He wore the garb of the lowly and his feet trod the byways of the poor; but his was a great soul that held daily converse with his God. If the tide of world-fret ever reached him it left him unrufiBed, for he had a great peace—the peace of God. It would be unseemly to offer him praise; he dwelt in an atmosphere above it. His biography is written in communities where he lived—upon the hearts of the people for whom he labored, but his interest in humanity was not confined to these; it extended to the outermost ledge of this old world of ours, wherever a human soul might be found. His heart was big enough to take in all.

Mr. Kelly was born on Clifty creek, Pulaski county, Kentucky, June 15, 1808. His father, Samuel Kelly, was born in Botetourt county, Virginia, February 7, 1776, and was the third son of Thomas Kelly, whose birth occurred near Philadelphia about 1750. The ancestral home was Castle Kelly, Ballinasloe, County Roscommon. Ireland. When a young man Thomas Kelly ran away from home to avoid being pressed into the English army. He settled in Virginia and about 1800, with his wife, Peggy (Biles) Kelly, and their family, emigrated to Kentucky, settling in Pulaski county, where he died a few years later at the home of his son Samuel on Clifty creek. His wife passed away in 1814.

Samuel Kelly, having arrived at years of maturity, was married September 3, 1807, to Nancy Canada, a neice of General Canada, and they began their domestic

CLINTON KELLY

life on Clifty creek, seven miles from Somerset, Kentucky. There he erected two mills and manufactured fiour, saltpetre, Epsom salts, turpentine, linseed oil and gunpowder. Though he had no educational privileges in early youth, he became well versed in law and history. His wife was a woman of unusual personality, of strong religious tendencies, enthusiastically supporting the Methodist church and openly antagonistic to the use of liquor, then so common. Samuel Kelly died October 13, 1834, his wife surviving until the 26th of January, 1841. Their children were Clinton, Albert, Temperance, Gilby, Cyrene, Sena, Gilmore, Samuel, Rachel, Tabitha and Thomas. Of these Clinton, Gilby, Albert and Samuel were itinerant ministers and Sena became the wife of Josiah Godbey, also a preacher.

Clinton Kelly spent his boyhood on the home farm with little chance for the attainment of an education. He came of a Methodist home and a consecrated mother; it was also the home of the traveling preacher; hence it is not strange that Clinton and three of his brothers became Methodist circuit riders. He was converted at eighteen and so marked was the change that it was evident to his neighbors and friends what his misson to the world would be. He began preachng, usmg the second story of his father's house as a meeting place. With his yoke ot steers he hauled logs with which he built a school house and taught the first school in his home neighborhood. Soon afterwards he and his brothers built the church, the site of which was and is still called Mount Zion, and there they continued to preach the Gospel for some time.

When nineteen years of age Clinton Kelly was united in marriage to Miss Mary Baston and to obtain the license fee, for which he had to pay a dollar, he made and sold in Somerset a barrel of cider, crushing the apples by hand. In 1834 he attended the annual conference in Kentucky, -became an itinerant minister and was assigned to the Elizabethtown circuit. He traveled up and down the knobs and vales of Kentucky, enduring privations as a good soldier of Jesus for many years. He was self-taught; rather he was taught of the Spirit. He had three months of schooling; nay, his whole life was spent in the school of Christ, and he who learns in that school is truly wise. Diligent application at the pine-knot blaze gave him a start, and a life of reading and study rounded out a well formed character. But his chief study was the Bible. He carried a testament in his pocket and read on the way to his appointment or while waiting at the mill for his grist; no precious moment was lost. He talked well upon all subjects but the Bible was his text-book, the love of God his theme. He had studied to such purpose that where others stumbled he quoted correctly no matter what the passage; his expositions were rich and clear, for they were Spirit-illumined. His illustrations appealed to the masses; his pictures were of life as he saw it every day; no incident was too homely to point a lesson. As his family increased he worked the harder, his shoemaker's kit dividing the time with his books on long and lonesome horseback journeys. Perhaps it was a basket to be woven as he rode or some other useful art was brought into play, for in those days men and women did everything and children early fell into the habit.

Twice his Kentucky home was bereft of wife and mother. His first wife died leaving five sons: Plympton, Hampton, Archon, Calmet and Bengal. All of these have crossed the flood. The oldest and last to go was Plympton Kelly, founder of Kelly Homestead Farm near Portland. Not long after losing his first wife Clinton Kelly married Miss Jane Burns, who died three years later, leaving a daughter, Mary Jane. On the nth of March, 1840, he wedded Moriah Maldon Grain, a daughter of John and Sarah (Rousseau) Grain, of Pulaski county, and a granddaughter of Samuel Grain, of Culpeper county, 'irginia. who was a member of the United States navy during the Revolutionary war and in 1797 removed to Kentucky. In the maternal line Mrs. Kelly was descended from Hillaire Rousseau, a Huguenot who came from France and settled in Virginia following the revocation of the edict of Nantes by Louis XIV, October 22, 1685. Her great-grandfather, David Rousseau, wedded Mary Harrison, a niece of Benjamin Harrison, a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Rev. Clinton Kelly continued to preach and to work with the aid of his wife, so that his entire salary might go for books. His cash receipts for an entire year often fell below five dollars in coin. At the time of their marriage Mrs. Moriah Kelly had twelve dozen pairs of socks which she had spun and knitted and these were exchanged for broadcloth for a suit for her husband. He was a man of plain and simple tastes and habits but a hard worker, never idle for a moment When political strife divided the Methodist church he decided to move to the west, built wagons, gathered his belongings together and in the fall of 1847 started for Oregon with his brothers Albert and Thomas. The first night out after reaching Independence, Missouri, in a hailstorm the cattle stampeded and Albert Kelly was compelled to remain behind in an effort to regain his cattle, all of which had been lost in the stampede. The ever generous nature of Clinton Kelly is indicated by the fact that on this occasion, realizing the great loss sustained by his brother, he insisted on giving him liberal financial aid. The toilsome journey of six months was made with ox teams over burning sands and cragged mountain ranges. In the fall they arrived at Oregon City, the capital of the provisional government of Oregon. The Methodist church had already established a mission at this point and the place was partially fortified against Indians. The sturdy Kelly boys soon found work getting out timbers for George Abernethy, the provisional governor.

An incident narrated by Plympton Kelly lent variety to their lonely life; it was in regard to the coming of the first territorial governor, General Joseph Lane. The new governor was expected on a certain day and great preparations were made for his reception. Everybody was on the alert when a canoe was sighted coming up the river. At nearer range it was observed to be paddled by Indians and carrying a white man. When without hailing distance a man on shore called through his hands: "Is Joe Lane in that canoe?" A form rose in answer and shouted back: 'Tin the man!" The guns boomed a joyous welcome and the air rang with acclamations of delight as General Lane stepped on shore. The new governor dined with the old that day and everybody rejoiced that "The Oregon Country" was at last a regularly organized territory' of the United States over which "the stars and stripes" spread its protecting folds.

The Grim Messenger did not forget Clinton Kelly in the new land—came often enough to preserve in his heart a God-like tenderness. That winter two promising boys, Calmet and Bengal, were laid under the sod of Green Point, hushed to their long slumber by the music of the Willamette. In the spring the family moved to a cabin on the James B. Stevens place on the bank of the river opposite Portland, then merely a few log shanties. Later in the same season Mr. Kelly bought the right of a previous homesteader to six hundred and forty acres of what was afterward known as the Clinton Kelly Donation Land Claim, lying two miles east of the river, for which he was to pay fifty dollars. There was a log hut on the place and a few acres partly cleared. He sowed all the cleared land to turnips, raised a big crop and paid for his claim that year.

In the course of time an immense log house rose on the site now occupied by the Williamson Sanitorium. The log house was a landmark for many years. It was running over with people during the Indian troubles of 1855 and 1856, farmers hurrying in well armed, expecting an attack. It gave place to a frame dwelling from which Clinton Kelly passed out into the Life Eternal, in the year 1875. The present structure was built by his son-in-law. Captain J. W. Kern, who died some years ago.

Toiling for his daily bread, the subject of this sketch never forgot the charge Divinely given in his far-off Kentucky home—to preach a gospel of love wherever he went. He preached it most forcibly in his life. At different times he filled preaching appointments at Portland, Alilwaukie, Oregon City, Fosters. Mount Tabor and other places. In 1849 he preached the first sermon ever delivered in Portland, the meeting being held in a cooper shop in the vicinity of what is now Front and Stark streets, on which occasion nearly the entire population fifteen or twenty people, were present. Subsequently he hauled logs and assisted in building the first church in Portland. Clothed in homespun garments, his long jeans coat reaching nearly to the ground, a tall white beaver on his head and a Kentucky hickory in his hand, Sunday morning saw him setting out on foot for his appointment, his quaint "farewell" lingering long after he had passed from sight in the dim, silent woods. Portland, Milwaukie, Mount Tabor, Oregon City, Columbia, Slough, Lents, St. Johns, Sandy, Fairview, Fosters—indeed the greater part of Multnomah county derived spiritual food from his teachings. When it was too far to walk,—and ten or fifteen miles was no hardship—"Bob," a favorite horse brought across the plains, accompanied him. After a long life of service the faithful animal was buried in the grove near the house, the children standing around in tearful grief. Under diligent hands the Kelly acres were cleared and produce raised for the market. At first a wheelbarrow sufficed for transportation, while later a handcart was used, but as the town grew and business increased, facilities kept pace with the growing need. The farm literally fed the town. There are still those who will recall the lumbering wagon drawn by oxen, the homely figure, the genial smile that camef rom a heart warm with love for humankind. He never overreached anybody. One of his customers said to him: "Mr. Kelly, you sell too cheap!" He answered: "My motto is—Live and let live." The beautiful Willamette was an obstacle to business. A rude horseferry was in operation but on stormy days it was carried far out of its course and some days it never crossed at all. Often the loaded wagon with its occupant stood in the driving rain all day, only to return at night and try again the next day. Mr. Kelly built a flatboat for his own use, propelled by oars; but that was interfering with the business of others—at least it was so regarded—and the boat was cut loose from its moorings and left to drift along the flats of the east side. The truant craft was found, brought back and fastened by lock and chain to a tree. The next day both boat and tree were far down the river. When he returner after a fruitless trip and told the tale the family were indignant, but his happy laugh is still remembered; he seemed to consider it only one of the "light afflictions."

A stock company of east side residents was formed for the object of putting on a steam ferry. The Stark Street Ferry Company got out an injunction prohibiting any other company landing within certain limits. But the building went on, the steam ferry was finished and made regular trips, landing outside the proscribed hmits. Plympton Kelly was the captain of the new boat and its name was "Independence." But the old company found it was time to wake up and ere long another boat was under way, to be fitted up with boiler and engine. When the "Victory" appeared on the river with flying colors she made the short distance from bank to bank in much less time than was possible for the "Independence," restricted as she was to landing far above and below the city limits, the old company having purchased exclusive rights for a mile up and down the river. The "Independence" was finally withdrawn and put in the cattle-carrying trade, and the "Victory" was one in fact as well as in name. But the end sought had been obtained— an efficient means of crossing the river that could be relied upon with some degree of certainty.

In January, 1864, Clinton Kelly was called upon to bear what was probably the heaviest burden of his life; the Kelly home was again left without a mother. The years were telling upon him and he was less able to bear a load of sorrow that threatened to crush him. He had himself been near death's door, and it was this fact and the consequent watching night and day, which she would yield to no other, that prostrated Mrs. Kelly. Sorrowfully he rose from a sick bed and with a breaking heart bade the companion of his joys and sorrows a final farewell. He gathered the younger children around him—of whom there were five, the youngest a boy of seven— and together they mourned their irreparable loss. It was long ere he regained his wonted cheerfulness. Sometimes, on the spur of the moment, he would call her name, only to be reminded that she was far away, beyond the sound of human speech.

It is said that troubles never come singly; in the fall of that year the loghouse, its cellars and storerooms fairly bursting with provisions, was burned to the ground. A frost-proof apple house and a born soon followed and a few years later a large new barn stuffed with hay, the lower story containing hundreds of bushels of fruits and potatoes, was consumed by the flames. This happened at Christmas time. A heavy snow lay on the ground and the winter's stores were in ashes. One approached him pityingly, expressing regret at his hard lot. He responded with a laugh of almost boyish freedom: "This is a very small matter; my treasure is laid up in heaven. What if one of the children had been burned!" He might have said with Paul: "None of these things move me, neither count I my life dear unto myself, so that I might finish my course with joy, and the ministry, which I have received of the Lord Jesus." Once, in the early morning, while on his way to market with a heavy load of farm produce and while descending a hill near home, his youngest son, still a mere boy, walking beside the yoke of cattle, at a narrow point in the road slipped and fell in such a way as to be caught by the near front wheel. The wet condition of the road caused the body to skid for several feet before the oxen could be brought to a halt and thus a tragic termination of the lad's life was averted by a rare chance; or shall we call it Providence? The boy was only slightly hurt, but his coat bearing the muddy wheel marks was hung away in a closet to be worn no more, only to be taken out at times and contemplated with feelings of deep emotion, as if it were something sacred.

Clinton Kelly reared a family who have been a credit to his name, several of them becoming valued citizens of this part of the country. His oldest son, Plympton Kelly, was a prosperous farmer of Kellys Butte, Oregon, but is now deceased. Hampton Kelly, a great Bible student and church worker, died in Wasco county, Oregon, in 1899. Archon, for many years an itinerant preacher in Oregon died in Portland in 1890. Mar- Jane became the wife of James Akin, of Benton county, Oregon, and is now deceased. John Crain died in infancy. Sarah Margaret married J. W. Kern, of Portland, and both are now deceased. Penumbra Kelly is also living in Portland. He was sheriff of this district for a number of years and also by appointment of President Arthur was United States marshal of this district for several years, while for four terms he represented Multnomah county in the state legislature. Laura F. is the wife of E. Turner, of Stockton, California. Maria Emily is the widow of Rev. John Shaver, of Portland. Fredrika B. is the wife of Rev. Martin Judy, of the southern California confemce. Dr. Richmond Kelly is a resident of Portland. Raymond, the youngest, died in infancy. The descendants of the Rev. Clinton Kelly to the third and fourth generation live in and about Portland. They constitute, with the descendants of his three brothers mentioned above, his cousins the Fawcetts and other more distant relatives, the "Kelly Clan," which holds its annual reunion at Portland the last Saturday in June.

As the years went by Clinton Kelly's nature, always sympathetic, softened to a motherly tenderness. The cry of a child, the plaint of a hurt animal never went unheeded. No poor human waif was ever turned from his door; to such he tried to restore self-respect by giving him a chance to earn an honest living. In this way he gave home and employment to manv luckless stragglers, saying to himself: "But for the grace of God I might be as they are." Nor did he turn away any who came asking help for a worthy object. He began his religious life by building a house of worship; such was his love for the house of God that he delighted to lend a hand in all such enterprises. The first church erected in Portland owed much to his assistance and there he worshiped with his family until the coming of the log schoolhouse on the very top of Mount Tabor.

Of Mr. Kelly's last days on earth we speak reverently. Calling in his neighbors he told them he had not long to stay—that he was going home to God. He assured them his mind was as clear as at any time in life and expressed the great comfort and satisfaction he derived from the religion of the Lord Jesus Christ that he had tried to preach for many years. Then they knelt together in love and commemorated the Last Supper, joining in one of his favorite hymns — "I will sing you a song of that beautiful land;" after which he took each by the hand in an affectionate farewell, they "sorrowing most of all for the words which he spake that they should see his face no more." Shortly after he took his departure, to be "forever with the Lord."

From a contemporary writer we quote: "That man of God, Clinton Kelly, left the following testimony, given in his last hours, in favor of the religion of Jesus. It was with the greatest difficulty that he could converse with the friends "who called to see him, and in lieu thereof he requested that a copy of these, his dying words, should be addressed to each. Friend, imagine yourself standing upon the brink of death, the boundless unknown spreading away from your feet: have you the grace that enabled Father Kelly to utter these noble words? 'After a protracted affliction, very feeble in body and very near the end of my earthly pilgrimage, I feel a desire to inform my numerous friends, in and out of the church, of my prospects for another world. During my affliction I have had many manifestations of the great love of Jesus, which has given me patience and resignation and a good hope through grace; and I suppose that if hundreds, nay, even thousands of men and women were present to witness my unshaken confidence in God, who can have no such opportunity, it would be a saving lesson to them. I want to say to one and all that there is no name given under heaven whereby we can be saved only the name of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. For fifty years it has been my special care to make myself acquainted with the religious theories of the world, and the best you can do for your soul's sake is to cast the whole of them to the moles and bats and trust alone in Jesus Christ for salvation from sin here, victory in death, and eternal salvation above. This you would all admit if your souls were in my soul's stead, standing ready to depart. I want you to understand that this is not the result of a fevered brain or hallucination of any kind. I have not had an hour's fever in the whole course of my disease. My mind has been all the while as clear and rational as through common life. Now if this little circular should bring any of you to God, I am content.

Clinton Kelly.'"


RICHMOND KELLY, M. D.

Dr. Richmond Kelly, practicing medicine in Portland, is one of the pioneer settlers of the city, his birth occurring in Multnomah county, September 15, 1855. He is a son of the Rev. Clinton Kelly, who is mentioned above. His education was acquired in the public schools of Portland and in Willamette University at Salem, from which he was graduated with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1878. He then took up the study of medicine, entering Miami Medical College at Cincinnati, Ohio, from which he was graduated with the M. D. degree in 1884.

He spent two years, from 1883 until 1885, as interne in the City Hospital of Cincinnati, and in the fall of the latter year returned to Portland, where he has since engaged in the general practice of medicine. At college, however, he gave special attention to obstetrics and upon entering practice here became connected with the medical department of Willamette University as professor of obstetrics, which chair he held until the removal of that institution to Salem in 1896. He was a member of the staff of the Portland Hospital during its existence and he belongs to the city, state, county and national medical societies, the Portland Academy of Medicine and the American Academy of Medicine.
Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/232 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/233 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/234 C. C. COLT Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/237 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/238 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/239 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/240 AARON MEIER Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/243 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/244 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/245 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/246 J. WESLEY LADD Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/249 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/250 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/251 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/252 SIGMUND FRANK Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/255 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/256 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/257 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/258 JOHN BINGHAM Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/261 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/262 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/263 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/264 LOUIS FLEISCHNER Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/267 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/268 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/269 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/270
MATTHEW P. DEADY
LUCY A. H. DEADY Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/275 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/276 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/277 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/278 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/279 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/280 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/281 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/282 GEORGE LANGFORD Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/285 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/286 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/287 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/288 WILLIAM BECK Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/291 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/292 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/293 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/294

HENRY WEINHARD

Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/297 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/298 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/299 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/300 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/301 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/302 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/303 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/304 W. H. CHAPIN Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/307 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/308 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/309 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/310 THOMAS B. NEUHAUSEN Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/313 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/314 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/315 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/316 W. C. SLATTERY Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/319 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/320 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/321 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/322 J. H. PAGE Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/325 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/326 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/327 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/328 LEWIS C. GARRIGUS Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/331 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/332 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/333 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/334 WILLIAM FLIEDNER Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/337 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/338 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/339 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/340

ELIAS BRONG Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/343 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/344 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/345 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/346

P.A. MARQUAM JR. Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/349 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/350 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/351 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/352 H. L. KEATS Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/355 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/356 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/357 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/358 L. M. HIDDEN Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/361 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/362 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/363 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/364 L. L. HAWKINS Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/367 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/368 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/369 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/370 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/371 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/372 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/373 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/374 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/375 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/376 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/377 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/378 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/379 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/380 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/381 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/382 W. C. BRISTOL Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/385 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/386 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/387 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/388

J. D. LEE

Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/391 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/392 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/393 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/394 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/395 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/396 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/397 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/398

JOHN G. PORTER

MRS. J. G. PORTER Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/403 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/404 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/405 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/406

W. P. OLDS Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/409 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/410 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/411 have been most judiciously made and the great lumber industries of the Pacific afford a splendid market for his property when he desires to place his holdings upon sale. He belongs to that class of young men whom the west are continually attracting by reason of the splendid opportunities here offered, his keen discernment enabling him to realize the value of such opportunities.


FRANCIS I. McKENNA.

Francis I. McKenna, the intelligent direction of whose labors and investments have placed him in the ranks of Portland's prominent and wealthy citizens, has been both the architect and builder of his fortunes. Earnest, self-denying labor was his lot in early manhood, but with ambition and ability to work his way upward, he has steadily progressed along lines of general usefulness as well as individual success. He was born in Perry county, Ohio, February 25, 1859, a son of William and Charity (Burgoon) McKenna, who were farming people of that district. The fact that he is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution indicates his descent from one of the old colonial families, the records of the organization indicating that it is through the maternal line that he came into connection with this society. The genealogy record on his father's side is traced to Clan Mackenna in the twelfth century, and the clan records are now in St. Mary's Hall at Belfast. Ireland. On the mother's side the ancestry is traced back to Alsace, in the fourteenth century. She was a second cousin of Archbishop Hughes, famed for having diplomatically prevented foreign interference in the Civil war.

Between the ages of six and twelve years Francis I. McKenna attended the district schools of Perry county, Ohio, from three to six months each year. Thereafter he had no school training except about five months devoted to a normal course. His parents died when he was yet a child, and he could make no plans for the future but grasped every opportunity from day to day. With ambition to obtain an education, the necessity for food and clothing demanded his attention. However, he borrowed text-books and reference books and questioned the priest, the preacher and the teacher at every meeting, using every available opportunity to promote his knowledge and thereby increase his usefulness and his chances for advancement. He labored in the mine, on the farm, on railroad construction and with the section gang. By the hardest kind of common labor and nightly study he was enabled at the age of eighteen years to put aside the garb of a common workman and take up the profession of teaching in a country school. For four years he taught in the public schools of Ohio and for two years was a teacher in Creighton College at Omaha, Nebraska. Abandoning that profession in 1883, he afterward followed various pursuits, being for a time an employe of the Union Pacific Railroad Company, a commercial traveling salesman and for a short period a retail drug merchant. The year 1889 witnessed his arrival in Portland and here he turned his attention to the real-estate business, in which the extent and importance of his operations have been such as to place him now with the wealthy men of the city. His keen discernment pointed out to him judical investments and the rise in property values, owing to the rapid growth of the city, brought him substantial returns, his sales furnishing him with ready capital, while his property holdings constitute for him a splendid collateral.

Mr. McKenna's study of the situation in Portland, as bearing upon his real-estate affairs, also led him to recognize the needs and opportunities of the city, and throughout the years of his residence here he has labored untiringly, earnestly and effectively for the improvement, betterment and adornment of Portland. He promoted the establishment of the first boulevard system of Portland, the establishment of the Portland University, now the Columbia Col-

FRANCIS I. McKENNA

lege, and the Portland Board of Trade. He made the first move toward holding an exposition in Portland by offering a resolution before the Board of Trade calling for a mass meeting of the citizens to plan for an exposition in 1902, which date was later changed to 1905. He organized the Portland Belt Line & Mount Hood Railroad, which brought about the construction of the Portland, St. John's Trautdale and Mount Hood lines of the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company. Thus he has been associated with many movements in which the public has been a large direct beneficiary, his labors being on many occasions a factor in the movements which have wrought the greatest good to the greatest number. He was the first president of the Initiative One Hundred which started the movement in the city of Portland for civic betterment and for the city beautiful.

In 1884 Mr. McKenna was married in Chicago to Miss Laura Linebaugh, a daughter of Noah and Sarah (McCaslin) Linebaugh, a granddaughter of Jonas Linebaugh and a great-granddaughter of Susana Wise, of the Wise family of Rockingham county, Virginia, who were important factors in the Revolutionary war for the freedom of America. Mrs. McKenna's mother was a daughter of Cunningham and Mary Ann (Allen) McCaslin and a granddaughter of James Allen, also of Revolutionary war fame. Unto Mr. and Mrs. McKenna has been born a son, Coe A., who was born at Omaha, Nebraska, October 22, 1887, and was graduated from the George Washington University in February, 1910, and received the degree of Master of Arts in June of the same year.

Mr. McKenna has long been known as one of the most prominent members of the United Artisans. In fact he was the founder of that highly successful fraternal beneficiary society and filled the office of supreme master artisan for eleven years, and for the same length of time was editor of its official paper, The Artisan. He now holds the honorary office in the society of senior past supreme master artisan. Strong in his honor and his good name, strong in his ability to plan and perform, he stands at the present time where he did in young manhood, as the champion of earnest labor, honorable principles and progressive citizenship. His own life record proves the value of each. He has never selfishly centered his activities upon his own interests, for while laudable ambition has prompted him to labor diligently for the achievement of success, he has at the same time done that for Portland which entitles him to classification with its real upbuilders and promoters.


JOHN McCOURT.

John McCourt, whose record as lawyer and lawmaker has gained him prominence as a representative of the legal fraternity of Portland, is now filling the position of United States attorney for Oregon, to which position he was appointed in March, 1908. He is yet a young man, his birth having occurred February 26, 1874, in Listowel, Canada. His parents were James and Emma McCourt, who resided in Canada until July, 1874, when they removed to California. Tlie father had engaged in teaching both in Canada and in this country, but in 1882 his sight failed and he turned his attention to other business pursuits.

Brought to the United States in his infancy, lohn McCourt was educated in the public schools of California and in the Willamette University at Salem, Oregon, spending a year in the literary department. He was also for two years a law student in that institution, from which he was graduated in June, 1896. The family had removed from California to Oregon in 1890, and following his graduation Air. McCourt entered at once upon the active practice of law in Salem, where he remained until May. 1900, when he removed to Pendleton, Oregon. There he followed his chosen profession until March, 1908, when he was appointed United States attorney for Oregon and removed to Portland to Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/416 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/417 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/418 J. O. STOREY Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/421 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/422 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/423 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/424 T. S. McGRATH Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/427 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/428 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/429 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/430 here for many years, having an extensive patronage and at all times rendering service of great value for he kept in touch with the trend of progress along professional lines, carrying his research and investigation far and wide into the realm of medical science. He was not only one of the pioneers but also one of the most capable and honored physicians throughout his connection with professional ranks in Portland.

His political allegiance was given to the democracy and he exercised considerable influence among the party leaders here. Both he and his wife were members of the first Presbyterian church and the weight of their influence was ever on the side of right, justice and truth. Dr. McKinnell passed away in San Francisco, California, September 29, 1893, and on the 9th of October following his remains were interred in the Portland cemetery. He had reached the venerable age of eighty-eight years, four months and thirteen days. A long life of great usefulness was thus closed but his memory is enshrined in the hearts of many who knew him and who honored him no less for his personal worth than his professional ability.


JUDGE REUBEN PATRICK BOISE.

When, at the age of eighty-six years, Judge Reuben Patrick Boise retired from the bench he thus terminated the longest period ever served by any judge in Oregon and eight years more in public office made his active official career cover a period of forty-three years. The record of no Oregon official has been more faultless in honor, fearless in conduct or stainless in reputation. The history of the judiciary of the state would be incomplete without mention of him, for his name is written high on the keystone of the legal arch.

From the date of his birth in Blandford, Massachusetts, June 9, 1818, until his death in Salem, Oregon, on the 10th of April, 1907, his life was one of untiring activity and usefulness. Following his graduation from Williams College with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1843 he prepared for and was admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1847. He then practiced law in his native state until 1850, but the west, with its broadening opportunity, called him and by way of the Isthmus of Panama he made his way to Oregon. The year following his arrival—1831—he was appointed by Judge Pratt to the position of district attorney and the following year was elected to the office by the territorial legislature. In 1854, in connection with James K. Kelly and D. R. Bigelow, he prepared the first code of Oregon laws and in many ways was closely associated with shaping the policy and molding the destiny of Oregon during its territorial days and in the opening years of statehood. He was a member of the territorial legislature and represented Polk county in the constitutional convention, his knowledge of law enabling him to aid largely in framing the organic law of the state.

In 1857 he was appointed by President Buchanan one of the justices of the supreme court for the Oregon territory and continued in the office until the admission of the state to the Union. He was then elected one of the first supreme judges, serving until 1870, when he was reelected but resigned on account of a threatened contest of election. He resumed the private practice of law but the value of his service was too widely recognized to permit him to remain long in private life and in 1874 he was elected one of the capitol building commissioners. In 1876 he was again elected supreme judge, serving until 1878, when the legislature divided the supreme and circuit judges into distinct classes. He was then appointed by Governor Thayer one of the supreme judges and served until 1880. His preference, however, was for circuit court work and in that year he was elected judge of the third judicial district, comprising the counties of Marion, Linn, Polk, Yamhill and Tillamook, continuing in that position by reelection until 1892. Resuming the practice of law, he continued a member of the Salem bar from 1892 until 1898, when he was again elected judge of the third judicial district and remained upon the bench until July, 1904, when he retired from public life at the venerable age of eighty-six years. He served on the supreme bench for seventeen years and on the circuit bench for eighteen years, his thirty-five years' service constituting the longest period of any judge in the state. Eight years more as a public servant made his active official career cover forty-three years—said by ex-Governor Geer to be the longest official record of any resident of Oregon.

Judge Boise always took an active part in public affairs, his influence being found on the side of progress and advancement and constituting a weighty element for success in that direction. He was a fluent speaker and delivered many notable addresses before the Pioneer Society, the State Historical Society and the State Bar Association, while the address which he delivered on the occasion of the unveiling of the Jason Lee monument on the fiftieth anniversary of statehood displayed great eloquence and literary ability. He was deeply interested in educational progress, was a member of the first' school board of Portland and at different times served as a trustee and member of the board of regents of the State Agricultural College at Corvallis; of La Creole Academy at Dallas; Willamette University at Salem; and the Pacific University of Forest Grove, the last named conferring upon him the degree of Doctor of Laws. He also took an active interest in the agricultural development of Oregon and at his death owned twenty-five hundred acres near Dallas, a part of which was his donation claim, secured from the government soon after his arrival in Oregon. He also owned one hundred acres adjoining the Indian school near Salem and the home farm of sixty acres within the corporate limits of Salem. He was five times elected master of the Oregon state grange, was many times a delegate to the national grange and contributed in substantial measure to the development and progress along agricultural lines, his own farming interests proving the possibility for the production of many kinds of fruit and cereal in the northwest.

Judge Boise was married twice. In 1851, in San Francisco, he wedded Ellen Frances Lyon, to whom he plighted his troth before leaving Massachusetts, and who with her parents came around Cape Horn that year. Three children of that marriage survive: Fisher A., now a resident of Dallas; Reuben P., of Salem; and Whitney L., of Portland, who is mentioned elsewhere in this volume. In 1867 Judge Boise wedded Miss Emily A. Pratt, of Worcester Massachusetts, who with their only daughter lives at Salem. The other daughter of this union. Ellen S. Boise, was drowned at North Beach in 1891.

When Judge Boise passed away his high standing as a man and citizen and as a representative of the judiciary of the state was indicated in the articles and editorials which filled the Oregon press, commenting upon his long and honorable service. Moreover, at the time of his demise all courts adjourned, all bar associations and public bodies passed resolutions and the leading public officials attended the funeral services. Associate Justice, now Chief Justice Moore, of the supreme court, said of him: "Judge Boise has probably done more than any other man to systematize the practice of law in this state and raise it to a higher standard. He was a man whose ability and integrity were recognized by all who knew him. His work stands as a monument to his glory. He and Judge Williams have played a great part in formulating the practice of our courts."

At the funeral services his lifelong friend. Hon. George H. Williams, paid to him the following tribute: "I have but a few words to say: Our departed friend comes down to his grave full of years and full of honors. He did not attain the highest office in the gift of the people but the position to which he was elected he filled with fidelity and a high and honorable sense of duty. 'Honor and fame from no condition rise; act well your part, there all the honor lies.' Judge Boise acted well his part, for which praises and honor are due to his memory. Few men have been more fortunate than Judge Boise was in his life. He was fortunate in the enjoyment of the confidence and respect of all who knew him. He was fortunate in his family, fortunate in his friends, fortunate in those circumstances which conducted to his comfort and especially fortunate in retaining his faculties unimpaired to the close of his long and useful life. Judge Boise, when living, was the oldest lawyer in the state and now he is gone. I am the oldest lawyer and as my relations to him were quite intimate I feel like one who treads alone 'some banquet hall deserted.' When I came to Oregon, now nearly fifty-four years ago, Judge Boise was in active practice of his profession. He was prosecuting attorney, while I was judge in this district, and made an able and efficient officer. Since then for the most part of the time he has been judge of the supreme or district courts and at all times and under all circumstances he was an upright and impartial judge. Judge Boise in his private life was irreproachable and his public life was above suspicion. When a man has reached the great age of Judge Boise, honored and respected as he was, there is no occasion to mourn over his departure. It is just as natural to die as it is to live—all must die—every blade of grass, every flower, every tree, every living creature must die; it is the inevitable law of nature and it is our duty to acquiesce as cheerfully as we can in this unchanging and universal law. I know that when death severs the ties of family and kindred it is natural for the bereaved to experience a sense of sorrow, but this sorrow is greatly alleviated when those who are left behind can look back upon the record that the departed one has made with pride and satisfaction. Springtime is a suitable time for an old man to take his departure from this world. When the trees are putting forth their leaves and the buds and blossoms begin to appear and the sun is shining and the birds are singing, and when all nature is putting on the habiliments of a new life, it is fitting that an old man should pass out of the winter of his life into the springtime of another and better existence. When the sun goes down it reflects upon the clouds that hang upon the horizon a golden hue and when a man like Judge Boise dies the record of his life reflects upon those who survive a radiance that resembles the glory of the setting sun. Whatever may befall our friend in another state of existence we can have no reason to doubt that he will receive his reward for the good deeds done in the body and we can all join as we sit around his lifeless remains in saying in the sincerity of our hearts, 'Well done, good and faithful servant, rest in peace.'"


B. LEE PAGET.

Becoming identified with the Pacific coast country in the years of his early manhood, B. Lee Paget has, in the intervening period, made substantial progress in lines of labor where only effort and fidelity win reward, and is now active in financial circles as the secretary of the Portland Trust Company of Oregon. Born in Burnett, Somersetshire, England, on the 14th of June, 1864, he is a son of Edward and Sarah Paget. He attended the grammar school of Bristol, England, but put aside his text-books before his fourteenth birthday in order that he might enter a wholesale grocery house as apprentice. Recognizing the restriction of labor in his native land, he resolved to seek and improve the opportunities of the new world, and in 1888 arrived in San Luis Obispo, California, where for one year he engaged in business as a dealer in ten.

In July of 1889 Mr. Paget arrived in Portland, Oregon, and after acting for a time as bookkeeper for the firm of Cohen, Davis & Company, accepted a similar position with Kelly, Dunne & Company. He was next given charge of the office of the great department store of Meier & Frank Company, where he remained for several years, leaving that position of large responsibility to accept Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/436 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/439 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/440 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/441 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/442 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/443 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/445 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/446 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/447 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/448 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/451 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/452 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/453 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/454 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/455 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/457 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/458 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/459 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/460 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/463 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/464 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/465 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/466 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/467 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/468 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/469 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/470 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/471 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/472 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/473 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/474 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/477 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/478 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/479 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/480 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/483 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/484 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/485 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/486 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/489 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/490 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/491 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/492 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/495 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/496 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/497 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/498 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/499 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/500 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/503 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/504 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/505 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/506 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/507 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/508 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/511 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/512 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/513 of the republican leaders of Portland and has served as assistant chief clerk of the Oregon senate, to which position he was appointed in 1901, while in 1907 he was made chief clerk of the senate. Strong and forceful in his individuality, although one of the younger men of Portland he is leaving his impress upon the legal and political history of the city.


Ask any of Oregon's pioneers concerning Mrs. Charlotte Moffett Cartwright and they will tell you of one who from the period of Portland's early development has taken an active and helpful part in the promotion of the civilization of the northwest; ask any connected with benevolent work and they will tell you that Mrs. Cartwright has been a leading factor along many lines of charity, yet she modestly disclaims any recognition for what she has done in these directions. Her good deeds have been the outpouring of a generous spirit and the expression of a nature that in its interests reaches out to all humanity.

Mrs. Cartwright was born in Chicago, Illinois, only five years after the city had been incorporated, her natal day being December 21, 1842. Her parents were James and Sophronia (Kurd) Terwilliger, the former a native of Holland and the latter of Scotch descent. They continued their residence in Chicago until May, 1845, when they started with their four children on a long trip across the plains to Oregon, being members of the party that took the Stephen Meeks "Cut-Off," thinking thus to find a shorter and more speedy route through to the northwest. The company became lost in the mountain wilderness, however, and death and destruction threatened them before they found their way again to the beaten path. Like many others, Mrs. Terwilliger was prostrated by the perils and hardships of the westward journey and survived only a few days after they reached The Dalles. The father with his little family continued on his way down the Columbia and up the Willamette until he arrived at the present site of Portland in November, 1845, and erected the first dwelling—a log cabin—on the immediate site of the city, which was founded in 1847.

The name of Charlotte Terwilliger is found on the roll of the first pupils of the first school taught in Portland. Her girlhood was passed amid the wild scenes and environment of pioneer life here in the little city that was built along the river front and was extending, as the population increased, across the lower levels and on to the surrounding hills. The most farsighted would not have dreamed during the period of her girlhood that Portland Heights and other heavily timbered regions would one day become the most beautiful residence district of the little city. Even at the time of her marriage Portland gave little evidence of the growth to which it has since attained.

It was on the 12th of April, 1860, that Charlotte Terwilliger became the wife of Walter Moffett, a young Englishman, who had prepared a home for his bride on Seventh street, where he later erected the house since owned and occupied by his family. The home has ever been open to all who sought its portals, especially to young men and young women, by whom its kind mistress was affectionately called "Mother Moffett." Even children, too, found shelter here and at the same time the most loving care and attention was given to the rearing of her own children—a daughter and five sons—of whom but two are now living, James and William. In 1862 the Moffett family went abroad and traveled for two years in France and the British Isles, spending much of the time, however, at Mr. Moffett's childhood home on the merrie isle, where his mother still lived. Mr. Moffett was a shipmaster and much of his life was passed on the sea. While away from home on a long voyage in 1878, he embarked upon the longer voyage to "that undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler returns." His remains were brought back to his Portland home for interment and now rest in Lone Fir cemetery beside his three sons and one daughter.
CHARLOTTE MOFFETT CARTWRIGHT
On the 8th of March, 1887, Mrs. Moffet was again happily married, becoming the wife of C. M. Cartwright of eastern Oregon. In his beautiful mountain home a new field opened to her. Her impulses for doing good to others were directed into different channels for out here near her abode lived the many ranch hands and employes of Mr. Cartwright, who assisted him in conducting his extensive stock business. They were largely men without families, knowing little of the pleasures of home life, and to their comfort Mrs. Cartwright ministered. They held her in the highest esteem, fully appreciating her motherly kindness and care. The entire community was to her an object of interest and she had at heart the welfare of all movements which tend to uplift humanity. She was a frequent and encouraging visitor at the schools in the neighborhood but the Sunday school received her most earnest efforts. In connection with this she established at her own expense a circulating library of standard works. These would be carried into homes one hundred miles distant but were always returned and the good reading which she thus provided lightened the labors of many a shepherd who thus found entertainment for his evening hours. It has ever been Mrs. Cartwright's delight to promote the well being and happiness of others and her entire life has been characterized by unselfish kindness and benevolence. Her gifts to charity have been quietly made and ofttimes have been unknown save to the recipient. Her heart responds readily to the call of the needy and the cry of the distressed, and her friends of fifty years ago are still her friends. She has labored earnestly and effectively in connection with various organizations which are factors in the world's progress and upbuilding. Living in Oregon from the period of its early development, she is now serving as chairman of the woman's auxiliary of the State Pioneers Association, acceptably serving in that office for many years and, moreover, she is the first vice president of the State Equal Suffrage Association, of the Forestry Club and of the Sacajawea Statue Association. She is a charter member of the Portland Woman's Club and is chairman of the Oregon history department in the club. Her work as president of the ladies auxiliary of the Pioneer Society is notable. In this connection she has instituted and promoted arrangements for holding an annual banquet which is one of the most attractive features of the annual Pioneers meeting. On these occasions the great hall of the Armory is set with long tables beautifully decorated with flowers and in gala array. Entertainment is furnished to a thousand or more guests. Mrs. Cartwright is a lady of excellent executive ability as well as social charm, and her innate culture and refinement make her most tactful, placing all who appear in her presence at ease. Her sterling characteristics as outlined in this review have, all unconscious to her, given her a hold upon the affections not only of the people of Portland but of Oregon as well that naught can sever.


WILLIAM BOND.

William Bond deserves mention in this volume not only because of personal characteristics which endeared him to his fellow men but also because he was one of the first manufacturers of Portland. For many years he remained a resident of this city, honored and respected by all who knew him. A native of Pennsylvania, he was born on the homestead farm on the banks of Lake Erie, February II, 1828. His parents were among the pioneer settlers of the Keystone state but at a more remote period his ancestors lived in New England. Both the father and mother of Mr. Bond were born in Massachusetts. His mother was a Cushman of the stock of Robert Cushman of the Plymouth Colony and was a cousin of Charlotte Cushman, the distinguished tragedienne. He was twelve years of age when he left home to learn a trade. He recognized the fact that his tastes and inclinations were along mechanical rather than agricultural

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PENUMBRA KELLY.

Penumbra Kelly, who for almost thirty years has been a prominent figure in politics in Portland and in Multnomah county, is well known throughout the entire state and also in southwestern Washington. He has been connected with the sheriff's office in Portland for twenty years and his faithful discharge of his duties has constituted an important service in behalf of law and order here.

His birth occurred in Marion county, Kentucky, March 29, 1845, his parents being the Rev. Clinton and Moriah (Maldon) Kelly. His father was an itinerant minister of the Methodist church, who belonged to the Kentucky conference for thirteen years. In 1848, however, he started with his family on the long journey across the plains to Oregon, proceeding- by the slow, difficult and tedious stages of wagon travel and arriving at his destination in the late autumn. They spent the winter at Oregon City, but in the spring of 1849 removed to the donation claim which the Rev. Clinton Kelly had taken up, and which is located in what is now East Portland. The father developed and improved the farm and continued to make it his home until his death, giving his attention largely to general agricultural pursuits. He never associated himself with the Oregon conference, but his interest in church work never abated and he continued as a local preacher until almost the time of his demise. He was one of the sturdy pioneers of early Portland, being numbered among the few who crossed the plains prior to 1850, arriving here at a time when it was thought that Oregon City would be the metropolis of the state, the site of Portland being marked by only a few log cabins that bordered the Willamette and were mostly occupied by traders. Even Front street at that time had not become a business center and the most farsighted did not dream that there would spring up on the site a city that would extend westward until it compassed the hills of Willamette and Portland Heights and eastward until it covered a great area upon the other bank of the river. The donation claim, which the father secured and upon which he lived for years, was at that time situated several miles from the village of Portland, although it is now included within the corporation limits of the greater city.

Penumbra Kelly was reared in the pioneer home of the family upon a farm which required in its development much arduous and unremitting labor. He experienced many of the hardships which devolved upon the boys and young men of his day, assisting his father and the other members of the family to clear away the timber, prepare the land for cultivation and then plow and plant the fields and harvest the crops. His educational opportunities were limited to attendance for only a few short months at the district schools, which were held in the winter seasons. After permanently putting aside his text-books he continued to make farming his occupation and was identified with general agricultural pursuits until 18S4, when he received appointment from President Chester A. Arthur to the position of United States marshal for the district of Oregon. For three years and five months he capably filled that important office, during which time he traveled largely over the state, and it is doubtful if there is a man living today in Oregon who has a more intimate acquaintance with the Slate and with its people than Penumbra Kelly. His capable service as United States marshal commended him for election to the office of sherif of Multnomah county in 1888. He was twice reelected, serving for three consecutive terms, covering the period from 1888 until 1894. Since his retirement he has served almost continuously as deputy sheriff, so that his connection with the sheriff's office covers more than twenty years. He has long been recognized as a leading and influential member of the republican party in Multnomah county, makes friends easily and even his political enemies admire him for his qualities as a man and his fearless defense of his honest convictions.

Mr. Kelly was united in marriage, on September 30, 1873, to Miss Mary Emma Marquam, the eldest child of Hon. Philip A. Marquam, of whom mention is made elsewhere in this volume. They have three children, Mary Agnes, Samuel Ralph and Sarah Maldon. The last named is the wife of Nicholas Cogley, and they have one child, Nicholas Penumbra Cogley.

Mr. Kelly is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His activity in political circles, his wide and favorable acquaintance throughout the state and the fact that he is numbered among the earliest of the Oregon pioneers all entitle him to representation in this volume.


PHILIP CHURCH SCHUYLER.

The name of Philip Church Schuyler is closely interwoven with many of the events which stand prominently forth upon the pages of Portland's history. Moral and musical interests of the city, the cause of intellectual development and many municipal projects profited by his cooperation, and thus his life work became an integral chapter in the annals of the city. New York numbered him among her native sons, his birth having occurred in Ithaca, on the 4th of December, 1835. He was descended from Philip Schuyler, who came from Amsterdam, Holland, prior to 1650, and who married Margarita Van Schlictenhorst and lived in Albany, New York. His parents, Philip Church and Lucy M. (Di.) Schuyler, lived for a time on a farm near Ithaca, New York, where his grandfather, John H. Schuyler, had resided. Later his father engaged in the drug business in Ithaca, where he remained until 1855, when he removed to Kansas with his family and there became deeply interested in the struggle to make Kansas a state. He was a devoted adherent of the anti-slavery cause and therefore cast the weight of his influence in favor of its admission as a free state.

The youthful days of Philip Church Schuyler of this review were passed in his native city, where his attention was largely given to the acquirement of his education in the public schools. At the age of seventeen years, however, he left the Empire state to cross the plains to Oregon in the year 1852. with his uncle, the Hon. William H. Gray, who first came out with Marcus Whitman as a missionary and who married Mary Dix, the sister of Philip Schuyler's mother. James C. Van Renssalaer also accompanied the party to the northwest and the long, tedious journey across the continent, fraught with many hardships and dangers, was completed in the fall of that year. Here Mr. Schuyler engaged in the drug business in connection with Smith, Davis & Company until the firm dissolved, after which he turned his attention to the insurance business, in which he continued with success for many years.

At the same time Mr. Schuyler found opportunity for cooperation in many public affairs and was ever deeply interested in any (Project relating to the city's welfare or betterment. He served as a member of Governor Gibbs' staff in 1863, and became connected with the first fire department of the city—a volun-

P. C. Schuyler
teer organization known as Willamette Engine Company No. i. He joined this in 1853, and was its foreman for many years. He served as clerk of the water board from 1885 until his death, during which time he began agitating and stanchly advocating the question of using Bull Run water.

On the 5th of June, 1867, Mr. Schuyler was married in the First Presbyterian church of this city to Miss Lucy S. Hurd, and unto them were born three children: Genevieve, the wife of William C. Alvord; Lucy, the wife of Frederick G. Wheeler, and Emily, who died in 1885.

In politics Mr. Schuyler was ever a stanch republican from the time when age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He took the chapter degrees in Masonry and was a life member of the Portland Library Association from the time it was started. He also sang in the Presbyterian church choir from the time the church was organized in 1854 until his death, which occurred October 28, 1889. He was always identified with musical societies and musical matters generally and did much to foster a love of and taste for music in this city. His nature was one to which only that which is uplifting made appeal, and his cooperation was always given to those things which promoted intellectual, social and moral progress, and to those public movements which were matters of civic virtue and civic pride.


CHARLES A. MACRUM.

Dr. Charles A. Macrum, one of the oldest and best known homeopathic physicians of Portland, devoting his attention to general practice, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, December 28, 1861. He is the eldest of six children, all of whom are living, whose parents are I. A.. and Westana (Grubbs) Macrum. The father, a native of Pennsylvania, came to Portland in 1871, spending three years in Oregon City, after which he located in Portland in 1874. He practiced his profession for about ten years as a member of the firm of Johnson, McCown & Macrum, one of the most prominent law firms of the city in its day. Then with others he organized the Merchants National Bank, of which he was the manager for ten years. He afterward resigned to become railroad commissioner, filling the office for six years. His death occurred in 1902, when he was sixty years of age. He was one of the best known men of the state, prominent and active in the development of Oregon, advancing many ideas the practical worth of which was proven in their adoption and utilization. His wife, who is still living in Portland at the age of sixty-seven years, was a daughter of Willam Grubbs, who came to this state from Pennsylvania in 1870.

Dr. Macrum was a lad of about ten years when the family arrived in Portland, and in the pursuit of his education he completed the high school course with the class of 1879, when seventeen years of age. Five years later he took up the study of medicine and was graduated from the University of Michigan in 1889 with the M. D. degree. Returning to Portland he has since followed his profession in this city as a general practitioner and is one of the oldest and best known homeopathic physicians here. He has always made his professional duties his first consideration, being most thorough and conscientious in the performance of the work that devolves upon him in this connection.

Dr. Macrum belongs to the Oreeon State Homeopathic Society, the American Institute of Homeopathy, the Oregon State Medical Association, the Multnomah County Medical Society, the Portland Medical Society and the American Medical Association. He is identified with the building of the new hospital now nearing completion and is well known in other professional connections. He has been assistant surgeon and surgeon of the First Regiment of the Oregon National Guard for about five years, having previously been a private of Company K for two years. Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/586 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/587 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/588 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/589 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/590 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/593 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/594 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/595 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/596 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/597 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/598 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/601 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/602 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/603 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/604 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/607 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/608 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/609 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/610 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/611 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/612 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/615 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/616 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/617 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/618 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/619 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/620 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/623 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/624 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/625 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/626 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/629 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/630 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/631 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/632 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/633 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/634 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/637 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/638 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/639 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/640 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/641 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/642 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/647 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/648 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/649 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/651 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/652 On September 24, 1873, at Olympia, Washington, Mr. Alger was united in

marriage to Miss Mira Brooks, a daughter of Washington S. and Mahala E. (Chapman) Brooks. Her father came to Oregon from Michigan in 1870. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Alger, three of whom are yet living: Hollis E., Edgar B. and Morton D.

Mr. Alger was born in a lumber country and was never happier than when in the lumber camp. He was essentially a man of large affairs. In his hands business assumed tangible form and grew and flourished and the results were seen in prosperous and happy homes. He belonged to a class of men that have the constructive faculties largely developed — the natural leaders who are absolutely essential in a new country and who prepare the way for the oncoming thousands. Of Mr. Alger it may be said that he was prominent not only on account of the success that he attained as a business man but for his honorable and straightforward methods in all business transactions. He was a man of genial temperament and in all he did was actuated by a spirit of fidelity to principles of honor and truth.


GEORGE WASHINGTON WEIDLER.

George Washington Weidler, identified with the history of the west from the old days of the pony express to the time of his death, more than a half a century later, lived for a time in Salt Lake City, afterward in other parts of Utah and Nevada, and in 1866 arrived in Portland. Already this city had made some strides toward the attainment of its present proud position and yet its conditions were but embryonic. His business ability and initiative spirit enabled him to enthuse new life into the community and to institute projects which have been of the greatest benefit in promoting Portland's welfare. Macaulay has said that the history of a community is best told in the lives of its people, and an important chapter in Portland's progress is covered by the life record of George Washington Weidler. A native of Pennsylvania, he was born at Lancaster, October 22, 1837, a son of Isaac C. and Catherine (Gaelbach) Weidler, who were born in the Keystone state but were of Swiss-German descent.

In the common schools of his native city George Washington Weidler pursued his early education and afterward attended school at Mount Joy and at Strausburg, Pennsylvania, where he was a pupil in a boarding school. On account of his health he was then sent to St. Louis, Missouri, where he became a clerk in a hardware store that afterward rated as the largest in that city. Subsequently he was employed as freight clerk on steamboats running from St. Louis to New Orleans, and afterward was made superintendent of a wagon train of mule teams that was conveying a stock of goods to Salt Lake City to be used in the establishment of a e-eneral store there. This was in 1855. Mr. Weidler remained there for three years and clerked in a store, after which he went to Fort Bridge and was made agent for the pony express, there continuing until about 1861. He next became agent for a stage coach company running stages between Carson City and Virginia City, filling that position for about two years. At the end of that time Ben Holladay offered him the choice of several positions and he accepted that of purser on a steamboat running between San Francisco and Maxland. He acted in that capacity for several years, his obliging manner as well as capable business ability making him popular with the patrons of the road as well as with the promoters of the business. He came to Portland for the same company in 1866 and was made agent at this place, continuing in that connection until Mr. Holladay sold out about 1883. During that time he had also engaged in other business. He was associated with Mr. Holladay in the ownership and conduct of an extensive saw-

mill and also in the first electric light plant in Portland. Mr. Weidler was agent for all the steamboat lines whose vessels docked at Portland, became interested in the first street car line, in the first crematory and the first electric light plant in his place. He was preeminently a man of affairs and became an active factor in promoting and controlling many of the most important business undertakings in this city. He was manager of the Oregon Transfer Line, and in this and other connections became closely associated with freight and passenger transportation in this part of the country. He lived to witness many changes from the days of the stage coach and the pony express in the west, to that of modern travel by steamboat and train. His ready recognition of opportunities led him to cooperate in movements which have been of practical and great value to the community and have constituted important features in the development of Portland's commercial and industrial interests.

Mr. Weidler was united in marriage at Portland on the 1st of October, 1879, to Miss Hattie L. Bacon, a daughter of Charles P. H. and Clara A. (Clark) Bacon, who were among the early settlers here. Her father was born in Camden, New York, on the i6th of April, 1821, and was a son of Dr. William and Harriet L. (Hunt) Bacon, who were of English descent. Her father was a pupil of the public schools of Camden, and afterward learned the printer's trade. When a small boy, however, he removed to Michigan with his parents, and later the family took up their abode in Princeton, Illinois. Charles Bacon worked on the Erie canal during the time of its construction, and was a pioneer resident of the middle west, but the Pacific coast country attracted him and on the 4th of March, 1850, he started from Princeton across the plains, arriving in Oregon City on the 4th of September. He made the long Journey on horseback in company with a single companion, Mr. Turner. After arriving at Oregon City he secured work with Mr. Lovejoy, the owner of a sawmill there. His limited capital rendered immediate employment necessary for he had but fifty cents when he reached his destination. He remained in Mr. Lovejoy's services through the winter and then came to Portland, where he began driving a dray for Mr. Sherlock. He had in the meantime, however, worked in Portland for a time for Mr. Barnhart and Mr. Pritchard, well known pioneers settlers here. After remaining in Mr. Sherlock's employ for a time, he formed a partnership with him that was maintained until 1863, when they partially divided their interests, and Mr. Bacon returned to the east. They did not entirely separate their business interests, however, until about 1900. They owned considerable property, both city and farm land, and also conducted a harness business and dealt in fine horses.

In 1855 Mr. Bacon became agent for the Wells Fargo Express Company and traveled around the country delivering packages during the Indian w'ars. He and his partner purchased what became known as the Sherlock block, and owned considerable other property in Portland, the extent and nature of their interests making them prominent and representative citizens of the city. Mr. Bacon not only figured actively in business circles but also served as councilman in the early days, filling the position in 1858, and thus taking part in shaping the municipal welfare of Portland during its formative period. He was an active, helpful and prominent member of the Episcopal church and served as vestryman throughout the greater part of his life. He was one of the first vestrymen in Portland and was filling that position at the time of his death, which occurred February 10, 1901. He was laid to rest in the beautiful Riverside cemetery, where the grave of his wife was made by his side. She was born in Warren, Maine, March 24. 1828. and they were married in Portland, January 17, 1855, at the house of Captain Richard Hoyt. the wedding ceremony being performed by Bishop Scott of the Episcopal church. Mrs. Baron had been previously married, her first husband being Captain Goodwin, with whom she came around the Horn about 1852. She made several trips to the Pacific islands with her husband, who later died at sea. Mrs. Goodwin, who afterward became Mrs. Bacon, then made her home in Portland and was here married the second time. She continued to live all her later life in this city and was one of the most highly esteemed and best known pioneer women here. Her death occurred March 17, 1906. Their children, beside Mrs. Weidler, were: Lizzie, who was born in August, 1858, in Portland, and died in 1861; and Charles H., who was born May 26, 1860, and is now living in Seattle.

The other member of the Bacon family was Mrs. Weidler, who has spent her entire life in Portland and has practically witnessed its entire growth from a village to its present metropolitan proportions. She attended a school which stood on the present site of the Portland Hotel, living in a district that is now the business center of the city. On the 1st of October, 1879, she gave her hand in marriage to Mr. Weidler and they became the parents of seven children, of whom two died in infancy.

The death of Mr. Weidler occurred on the 19th of September, 1908. According to his wish his remains were cremated and his ashes now lie in the family lot. During the latter part of his life he joined the Episcopal church. He was prominentlv associated with the first clubs of Portland, becoming a charter member of the Portland, the Arlington and the Commercial Clubs. His name is inseparably interwoven with the history of the city and he left the impress of his individuality upon its business development, its municipal advancement, and its social progress. Throughout his life he looked beyond the exigencies of the moment to the possibilities of the future and so he utilized opportunities which others passed heedlessly by. He seemed to understand just when the time was ripe to institute new projects and the spirit of enterprise which animated his every action made him a leader and valued factor in much of the development and upbuilding of the city. No history, therefore, would be complete without extended and prominent reference to George Washington Weidler.


WILLIAM SIMON U'REN.

William Simon U'Ren, a member of the bar at Oregon City, practicing as a partner of C. Schuebel, was born in Lancaster, Wisconsin, January 10, 1859, a son of William Richard and Frances Jane (Ivey) U'Ren. In the acquirement of his education he attended successively the public schools of Nevedaville, Central City and Black Hawk, Colorado, until 1868. A removal of the family was then made to Cheyenne, Wyoming, where he reentered school and later he studied at Plum Creek, Nebraska, and at Lancaster, Wisconsin. He afterward supplemented his public-school course by study in Denver Business College at Denver, Colorado, attending the evening sessions during the winter months of 1878 and 1879. The succeeding two years were devoted to the study of law and he was admitted to practice before the Colorado bar at Denver in January, 1881. He located for practice in Gunnison and in Denver, and devoted eight years to his profession in that part of the country, coming to Oregon in 1889.

Locating in Oregon City, he has since been numbered among the representatives of the bar at this place and his ability has won recognition in a large and distinctively reresentative clientage. He continued in practice alone until January, 1901, when he formed his present partnership with C. Schuebel. The firm is regarded as a strong one. Mr. U'Ren's interpretation and application of the law is usually correct, and it is proverbial that he most carefully safeguards the interests of his clients.

On the 6th of March, 1901, occurred the marriage of Mr. U'Ren and Miss Mary Beharrell. Their hospitable home is the scene of many delightful social functions. Mr. U'Ren gives his political allegiance to the republican party, and upon its ticket was elected from Clackamas county to the Oregon legislature in June, 1896. He is a member of the American Political Science Association, of tlie Oregon City Commercial Club, and of the National Municipal League. On questions of vital imi)urt he keeps abreast with the best thinking men of the age, and local advancemeiu and national progress are both causes dear to his heart.


JOHN JACOB WINTLER.

Forty-three years have come and gone since John Jacob Winllcr became a resident of Clarke county, Washington. In the earlier period of his residence here he was connected with agricultural pursuits and later was for many years a prominent representative of mercantile interests in X'ancouver, but at the present time is living retired, enjoying well earned rest. He was born July 29, 1837, in Switzerland, and when si.xteen years of age went to Havre, I-'rance, where he took passage on a sailing boat for New York. After a voyage of sixty-nine days, the vessel dropped anchor in the American harbor and soon afterward Mr. Wint- ler went from New York city to Buffalo, New York, where he was employed at harness making for a time. He then learned the trade of a machinist at the Eagle Iron Works, and in 1857 returned to New York city, where he boarded the steamer Republic, bound for the isthmus of Panama, landing at Aspinwall ; he then crossed the isthmus of Panama, and as a passenger on the steamship J. L. Stevens, proceeded to San Francisco, where he arrived in the latter part of August. He continued in that city until November, when he came up tiie coast by steamer to Portland, Oregon, and from there went to Parker's Land- ing, Washington, where he visited a brother for a few weeks. Returning to Portland, he found work at the machinist's trade in that city, and later engaged as engineer on the steamboat Independence, which ran between Portland and Monticello, and afterward between the Jefferson street landing and the Brooklyn landing, being operated as a ferry-boat. This was the first steam ferry- on the Willamette river. Mr. Wintler afterward entered the employ of Mr. Frush as engineer on a ferry-boat, which ran from the foot of Stark street to the east side. He continued in the service of Mr. Frush until i860, and in 1861 entered the employ of Robert Ladd, but after a few months accepted a position with Jacob Kamm as engineer on the steamboat on the Snake river. In 1864 he entered the employ of the Oregon Iron Works, in which connection he installed machin- ery on a ferry-boat built by Mrs. Frush. In i8f)6 he spent a few months as engineer on one of the boats owned by Captain Ankeny, and in (£ he caine to Clarke County, Washington. Here he turned his attention to farming, entering a claim about ten miles east of 'ancouver. For ten years he carried on general agricultural pursuits and then sold out, removing to Vancouver, where he bougjit out a harness and saddlery shop. He conducted this business for twenty-nine years, or from May, 1877, until May, 1906. On the expiration of that period he sold out and has since lived retired. For many years his was a most busy, useful and active life anil his lal)ors were crowned with a substantial measure of success. He has recently erected a two-story business block on Main street near Sixth.

In 1865 Mr. Wintler was married to Miss Lucy Knight, and unto them were born six children, of whom five are yet living: Marion A. is doing retouching in a photograph gallery in Portland ; Michael is a harness maker of Pendleton, Ore- gon; Clvde K. is a commercial traveler, representing a Tacoma (Wash.) house; Rali)h D., a saddler in the employ of the government in Alaska, is a veteraii of the Spanish-American war, having served in the Philippines; Walter D. is a dealer in automobiles in San Jose, California.

The wife and mother passed away in May, 1877. and on the 12th of Novem- ber, 1878, Mr. Wintler was married to Miss Sarah Butler, of Clarke county, who

crossed the plains with an emigrant train in April, 1878, from the southwestern Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/659 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/660 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/663 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/664 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/665 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/666 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/667 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/668 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/669 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/671 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/672 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/673 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/674 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 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Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/758 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/761 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/762 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/763 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/764 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/767 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/768 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/769 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/770 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/771 764 THE CITY OF PORTLAND

dent of Helena, Montana, where lie is ])resiilcnt of the Montana VVesleyan Uni- versity ; and Mrs. Martha Brown, who is living eight miles from Vancouver. In 1900 Mr. Tenney was again married, his second union being with Sarah llulett, of Vancouver. He is one of the best known farmers of this section, having for almost a half century been idenlitied with the as^ricultural interests of Clarke county, and his success proves what can be accomplished by indefatigable energy inielligently directed. RT. REV. CHARLES SCADDING. Rt. Rev. Oiarles Scadding, Episcopal bishop of Oregon, was born in Toronto, Canada, Xovember 25, 1861. He bes^an his ministry as curate with the Rev. V. S. Rainsford at St. George's church in New York city, and was for three years in charge of St. George's chai)el on Stanton street, one of the most crowded tenement districts in the world. He afterward served as rector of Trinity church at Toledo, Ohio, for five years and of Emmanuel church at La Grange, Illinois, for ten years. Dr. Scadding came to Oregon on the 12th of October, 1906, having been elected third bishop of this state by the diocesan convention which met in June of that year. He was consecrated at Emmanuel church in l.a Grange, Illinois, on the Feast of St. .Michael and .Ml . gels in 1906, and came to Port- land as successor to Ijishop Benjamin Wistar Morris, who died on the eve of Palm Sunday in that year. MRS. ANiA HAMILTON. .'mong the pioneer women now living in Oregon few can claim precedence of Mrs. . na Hamilton. As a child she first saw the si)ot where the city of Portland now stands, and at that time a solitary log cabin was the only evi- dence of human occupation. Great trees filled the valley and only a few brave settlers had taken up their homes along the streams where now are to be seen all the evidences of an advanced civilization. She has literally seen the city rise out of a wilderness and she has personally known hundreds of men and women prominent in early times who have long since passed from the stage. Mrs. Hamilton was born at Burlington, Iowa, February 9, 1842. Her par- ents, Dan ford and Mary Jane (Curtis) P.alch, were natives of Ohio, but they were married in Iowa and crossed the plains in 1847. There were forty ox teams in the train and the hardships of the journey were much more severe than those ordinarily experienced. The party was attacked by Indians, but un- der the leadership of an experienced pioneer the savages were driven off and a great danger was averted. While on the trail a son was added to uie lamny.

t the end of seven months the weary travelers entered the valley of the Willam-

ette and went into cam]). Location was made at a s])ot in the woods which Mrs. Hamilton identifies as the corner of Front and Washington streets. Early in the following spring Mr. Balch moved out on the jilains to a log cabin owned by a Mr. Wilkins, a farmer, who gave employment to the newcomer. In 1848 he accompanied the general movement of the able-bodied men to the newly dis- covered placer mines in California, returning in 1849. The death of Mrs. Wilkins brought additional responsibilities, a family of children being thus left motherless, and with the true pioneer spirit Mrs. Balch took charge of these children imtil other arranijcments were made. In the fall of 1850 Mr. Balch I'uilt a log caliin near what is now the corner of Twenty-seventh and Northrup streets and there the family lived for a number of years. He died in i860

and his wife departed this life fifteen years later. They had nine children: Anna, Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/775 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/776 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/777 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/778 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/779 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/780 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/783 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/784 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/785 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/786 BYRON Z. HOLMES Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/789 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/790 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/791 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/792 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/793 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/794 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/797 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/798 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/799 Page:Portland, Oregon, its History and Builders volume 2.djvu/800

INDEX


  1. Adams, L. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    580
  2. Adams, T. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    555
  3. Ainsworth, J. C.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    78
  4. Alger, Hollis
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    644
  5. Alisky, C. A.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    666
  6. Anderson, James
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    530
  7. Andrew, Brother V.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    777
  8. Annand, John
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    105
  9. Armstrong, A. P.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    440
  10. Arnold, W. D.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    239
  11. Arrigoni, S. N.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    753
  12. Avery, V. A.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    515
  13. Ayer, W. B.
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    192
  14. Bailey, Joseph
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    688
  15. Baker, G. L.
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    447
  16. Baker, J. G.
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    685
  17. Baldwin, E. A.
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    205
  18. Barber, S. J.
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    71
  19. Barbour, J. H.
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    41
  20. Barbur, A. L.
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    339
  21. Beach, J. V.
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    349
  22. Beall, J. S.
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    175
  23. Beck, William
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    282
  24. Beck, W. G.
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    123
  25. Beckwith, H. G.
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    117
  26. Beekman, B. B.
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    313
  27. Beharrell, W. H.
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    622
  28. Bennett, F. S.
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    379
  29. Bennett, Hiram
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    559
  30. Bennett, W. H.
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    607
  31. Berry, F. W.
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    596
  32. Bettman, Lazarus
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    782
  33. Beveridge, J. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    567
  34. Bigger, H. J.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    710
  35. Biles, James
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    345
  36. Bingham, A. J.
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    732
  37. Bingham, John
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    252
  38. Birrell, A. H.
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    245
  39. Blair, F. W.
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    785
  40. Blakely, N. L.
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    754
  41. Blossom, Elizabeth L.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    725
  42. Blossom, J. M.
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    723
  43. Blumauer, Simon
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    608
  44. Boise, R. P.
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    427
  45. Boise, W. L.
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    390
  46. Bond, William
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    511
  47. Bouton, E. F.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    564
  48. Boyhan, Michael
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    535
  49. Bradley, J. S.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    166
  50. Bridges, J. B.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    739
  51. Bristol, W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    376
  52. Brodie, G. A.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    59
  53. Bronaugh, E. C.
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    112
  54. Bronaugh, E. C., Sr.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    182
  55. Brong, Elias
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    334
  56. Brown, Matthew
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    505
  57. Buckman, Cyrus
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    673
  58. Burgard, J. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    137
  59. Burkhardt, G. J.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    537
  60. Burton, E. M.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    772
  61. Bushong, W. A. T.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    77
  62. Byars, Elizabeth
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    602
  63. Cameron, G. J.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    226
  64. Cannon, A. M.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    16
  65. Carey, C. H.
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    255
  66. Carson, J. C.
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    325
  67. Carter, S. H.
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    578
  68. Carter, W. A.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    99
  69. Cartwright, C. M.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    651
  70. Cartwright, Charlotte M.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    508
  71. Chalmers, J. M. P.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    693
  72. Chapin, H. L.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    287
  73. Chapin, W. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    298
  74. Chipman, L. B.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    629
  75. Christie, Alexander
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    445
  76. Clark, A. E.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    137
  77. Clarke, L. G.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    479
  78. Coffey, J. B.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    233
  79. Colt, C. C.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    228
  80. Connell, E. D.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    612
  81. Cook, J. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    72
  82. Corbett, H. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    22
  83. Cornelius, C. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    436
  84. Couch, J. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    374
  85. Couch, K. C.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    550
  86. Cox, A. M.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    250
  87. Cox, N. R.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    411
  88. Crawford, W. P.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    072
  89. Crichton, E. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    332
  90. Crouch, L. E.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    83
  91. Crowley, Daniel
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    588
  92. Damphoffer, Michael, Sr.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    633
  93. Davis, T. T.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    610
  94. Dawson, V. J.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    448
  95. Doady, M. P.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    264
  96. Dean, E. A.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    755
  97. Deaver, W. D.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    512
  98. Dckum. A. A.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    193
  99. Dekum, Frank
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    307
  100. Dieck, R. G.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    186
  101. Dolph, C. A.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    16
  102. Donovan, William
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    719
  103. Downing, F.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    104
  104. Drinker, F. P.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    589
  105. Durham, R. L.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    497
  106. Eastman, C. A.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    705
  107. Edlefsen, P. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    611
  108. Ell, Peter
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    762
  109. Emmons, A. C.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    243
  110. Engleman, Christian
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    680
  111. Esson, A. M.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    501
  112. Evans, Sarah A.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    718
  113. Failing, Edward
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    587
  114. Failing, Henry
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    66
  115. Failing, Josiah
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    50
  116. Farrell, Sylvester
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    132
  117. Ferris, O. L.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    351
  118. Fields, C. E.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    174
  119. Fields, L. R.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    143
  120. Finzer, W. E.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    274
  121. Flanders, G. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    521
  122. Fleischner, I. N.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    665
  123. Fleischner, Louis
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    258
  124. Fleischner, Marcus
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    595
  125. Flick, J. D.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    711
  126. Fliedner, William
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    328
  127. Flynn, P. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    704
  128. Foley, William
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    391
  129. Frank, Sigmund
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    246
  130. Frazor, A. L.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    698
  131. Frazier, William
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    630
  132. Freeman, F. F.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    430
  133. Freeman, J. M.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    747
  134. Fulton, C. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    466
  135. Gallien, C. L.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    775
  136. Galvani, W. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    717
  137. Ganong, C. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    491
  138. Ganong, J. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    211
  139. Gantonbein, C. U.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    100
  140. Garrigus, L. C.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    322
  141. Gates, G. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    745
  142. George, M. C.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    451
  143. Gibbs, A. C.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    156
  144. Giltner, B. F.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    733
  145. Giltner, F. F.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    536
  146. Glisan, R. L.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    263
  147. Glisan, Rodney
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    206
  148. Goddard, George
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    748
  149. Goddard, Mary J.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    741
  150. Going, J. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    200
  151. Goldsmith, L. J.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    622
  152. Goode, H. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    90
  153. Grant, F. S.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    507
  154. Gray, R. M.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    215
  155. Gridley, H. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    572
  156. Hall, J. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    403
  157. Hamilton, Anna
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    764
  158. Harper, A. J.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    791
  159. Harvey, ,John
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    535
  160. Haseltine, J. E.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    150
  161. Hawkins, L. L.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    358
  162. Hawthorne, J. C.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    118
  163. Hazen, G. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    435
  164. Henderson, Rhoda C.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    563
  165. Henrichsen, L. C.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    543
  166. Henry, C. K.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    465
  167. Herrin, D. C.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    191
  168. Hewitt, T. J.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    9
  169. Hexter, Levi
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    671
  170. Hidden, L. M.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    352
  171. Hill, C. H.
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    529
  172. Hill, Paschal
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    528
  173. Himes, G. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    138
  174. Hirsch, Solomon
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    144
  175. Hodge, Charles
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    556
  176. Hogue, C. P.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    582
  177. Hogue, H. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    116
  178. Holbrook, M. L.
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    309
  179. Holman, Charles
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    656
  180. Holmes, B. Z.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    773
  181. Hudson, H. S.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    410
  182. Hughes. E. G.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    494
  183. Hunt, G. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    546
  184. Hyskell, C. M.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    727
  185. Jackson, C. S.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    167
  186. Jackson, James
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    480
  187. Jacobson, C. S.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    749
  188. Jaggar, Benjamin
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    742
  189. Jeffery. E. J.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    557
  190. Johnston. D. E.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    8
  191. Kamni, Jacob
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    124
  192. Keating. John
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    357
  193. Keats, H. L.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    346
  194. Kelly, Clinton
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    218
  195. Kelly, Penumbra
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    573
  196. Kelly, Plympton
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    660
  197. Kelly, Richmond
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    225
  198. Kern, J. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    586
  199. Kerr, J. B .
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    76
  200. King, S. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    244
  201. Kollock, J. K.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    64
  202. Kraemer, Julius
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    65
  203. Krimbel, Jacob
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    659
  204. Labbé, Blaise
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    499
  205. Labbé, John
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    769
  206. Ladd, J. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    240
  207. LaForce, W. M.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    523
  208. Laidlaw, James
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    21
  209. Landess, Felix
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    579
  210. Langford, George
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    276
  211. Langsdorf, J. M.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    615
  212. Larrabee, C. X.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    599
  213. Lawrence, G. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    319
  214. Lee, J. D.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    382
  215. Lent, G. P.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    110
  216. Leonard, H. C.
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    454
  217. Lewis, C. H.
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    106
  218. Lewis, D. C.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    542
  219. Lewis, J. M.
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    337
  220. Lindsley, A. A.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    131
  221. Littlefield, H. R.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    568
  222. Logan, J. F.
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    192
  223. Lotan, James
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    694
  224. Lucas, M. M.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    761
  225. Lumsden, Alexander
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    720
  226. Lyon, J. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    756
  227. McChesney, Joseph
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    275
  228. McCourt, John
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    409
  229. McGratb, T. S.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    418
  230. McKenna, F. I.
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    406
  231. McKenna, C. L.
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    422
  232. McKinnell, Henry
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    424
  233. McMaster, Donald
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    467
  234. McPherson, G. L.
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    405
  235. Mackay, Donald
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    441
  236. MacMahon, M. J.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    42
  237. MacMaster, William
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    381
  238. MacMillan, Tirzah B.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    792
  239. MacNaughton, E. B.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    7
  240. Macrum, C. A.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    577
  241. Magers, J. E.
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    302
  242. Mallory, Rufus
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    5
  243. Manley, A. B.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    434
  244. Mann, J. M.
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    142
  245. Mann, P. J.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    468
  246. Marquam, P. A., Jr.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    340
  247. Marquam. P. A., Sr.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    217
  248. Marshall, John
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    776
  249. Marshall, R. A.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    200
  250. Mayer, F. J. A.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    75
  251. Mayer, M. A.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    681
  252. Meier, Aaron
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    234
  253. Melton, A. E.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    790
  254. Mendenhall, Edward
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    238
  255. Merges, E. E.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    39
  256. Miller, J. P.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    652
  257. Mills, A. L.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    484
  258. Miners, C. B.
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    525
  259. Mock, John
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    674
  260. Montague, S. S.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    568
  261. Moore, W. S.
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    585
  262. Morrow, W. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    603
  263. Moser, G. C.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    27
  264. Muir, W. T.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    227
  265. Mulkey, F. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    175
  266. Murdoch, Miller
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    226
  267. Murphy, D. R.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    99
  268. Neal, O. A.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    97
  269. Neuhausen, T. B.
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    304
  270. Nichols, A. S.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    212
  271. O'Brien, J. P.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    44
  272. O'Hara, Bernard
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    750
  273. Olds, W. P.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    400
  274. Page, J. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    316
  275. Paget, B. L.
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    429
  276. Parker, E. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    566
  277. Paxton, 0. F.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    538
  278. Perkins, Alonzo
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    709
  279. Perkins, R. S.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    767
  280. Peterson, Marshall
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    333
  281. Phegley, Grant
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    581
  282. Pittock, H. L.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    28
  283. Platt, H. G.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    297
  284. Platt, R. T.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    231
  285. Plummer, O. P. S.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    356
  286. Porter, J. G.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    392
  287. Portland Trust Co. of Oregon
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    418
  288. Powell. W. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    123
  289. Pratt, I. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    600
  290. Price, Richard
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    759
  291. Price, R. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    760
  292. Prudhomme, W. E.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    442
  293. Rauw, James
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    534
  294. Reid, William
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    83
  295. Riddell, H. H.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    43
  296. Riggs, F. C.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    658
  297. Risley, J. S.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    746
  298. Roberts, A. M.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    731
  299. Rogers. E. P.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    251
  300. Rowe, H. S.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    314
  301. Rowley, E. M.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    626
  302. Ryan, J. B.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    257
  303. Savier, Thomas
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    590
  304. Scadding. Charles
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    764
  305. Schnabel, C. J.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    203
  306. Schuyler, P. C.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    574
  307. Scott, H. W.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    34
  308. Scott, Richard
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    712
  309. Scott, William
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    716
  310. Seaman, C. B.
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    33
  311. Sharkey, J. P.
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