Proclamation 6775

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Delivered on 10 March 1995.

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Each National Park is a classroom without walls, a living laboratory for learning about natural environments, important historical events, and valuable cultural resources that make up our national heritage. To preserve this heritage, the National Park Service works with students and teachers to create exciting learning environments in which to activate a child's interest.

Within each park lies a compelling story-a powerful reminder of our Nation's origins and destiny. Geology, political science, marine ecology, the Civil War, language, art, music, maritime history, geography, wildlife, the American Revolution, technology-all come to life in our National Park System. Today, the men and women of the National Park Service are reaching out to the next generation of caretakers, instilling in our children a respect for the land, an understanding of our common American heritage, and an appreciation of parks as places of inspiration.

Through innovative educational programs, the National Park Service is actively building a new constituency of park supporters who will carry with them the most valued lessons of our country. "Junior Ranger" programs throughout the United States help children understand the wonders of the national parks and the importance of preserving them for years to come. "Parks As Classrooms" links parks with local schools and communities, reaching out to new audiences with hands-on activities. Residential camping programs open up new worlds of exploration and self-discovery for today's young people, in both inner cities and rural areas. Seminars for teachers assist in encouraging and improving the connections of young people to park areas.

National Park Week, 1995, is a time to celebrate the rich educational tradition of our parks. I encourage all Americans to join me in observing National Park Week as the beginning of a lifetime of learning, appreciating, and acting on behalf of our national treasures. I call on all Americans to learn more about our National Park System and to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and programs.

Now, Therefore, I, William J. Clinton, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim the week of May 22 through May 28, 1995, as "National Park Week."

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and nineteenth.

William J. Clinton

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 10:12 a.m., March 13, 1995]

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).