Quackery Unmasked

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QUACKERY UNMASKED:

OR

A CONSIDERATION OF THE MOST PROMINENT

EMPIRICAL SCHEMES

OF THE PRESENT TIME,

WITH AN ENUMERATION OF SOME OF THE CAUSES WHICH
CONTRIBUTE TO THEIR SUPPORT.




By DAN KING, M.D



"If quackery, individual or gregarious, is ever to be eradicated, or even abated, in civilized society, it must be done by enlightening the public mind in regard to the true powers of medicine."—Jacob Bigelow.


BOSTON:

PRINTED BY DAVID CLAPP.

1858.

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1858, by

DAN KING,

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the District of Massachusetts.

PREFACE.


Believing the diffusion of intelligence to be the only means by which the errors and mistakes of social life can ever be overcome, the author of the following pages has endeavored to present such information as might assist every impartial reader in understanding and judging of the numerous medical schemes and means now before the public. The work has not been written so much for professional, as for general readers; and it is confidently hoped that no one who gives it a careful perusal, will fail to be improved, although, among so many mooted subjects, it cannot be expected that every reader will adopt the views and sentiments of the author: but if it awaken a spirit of inquiry, which eventually leads to the truth, an important object will be accomplished. It has been compiled and written, at intervals of respite from professional labors; and if the reader should find the same sentiments advanced and nearly the same language made use of more than once, in the course of the work, the author hopes to be excused by all who are practically acquainted with the interruptions incident to professional life. In considering the subject of Homœopathy, he has made numerous extracts from the Organon, and several other works, which are of the highest authority with that order; and he acknowledges himself also much indebted to a work entitled, "Homœopathy, its Tenets and Tendencies," of which Prof. J. Y. Simpson, of Edinburgh, is the author. From the unsparing manner in which the author has commented upon several kinds of quackery, some might be led to infer that he has been prompted by personal animosity. But such is not the case; he has many highly esteemed personal friends among those whose medical theories he wholly repudiates, and he entertains no ungenerous feeling towards any individual, merely on account of his professional creed; but he has the charity to believe that there are many honorable, well-meaning men, who have, some how or other, been led astray into the devious paths of empiricism. Yet the author would have been false to his own convictions, false to his profession, and false to the interests of humanity, if he had not given unreserved utterance to the sentiments of his heart. And in offering to the public the following brief and imperfect sketches of some of the most prominent varieties of quackery, with a consideration of some of the causes which have led to their encouragement and support, he invokes the careful and candid attention of the reader. The subject is certainly one of importance, and deeply concerns every class and every individual in the community: and its examination should not be postponed to the moment of casualty or the hour of sickness, but should be made and settled in the quiet sunshine of health and serenity of reason. It is hoped, that from the hints here thrown out, many will be induced to examine more thoroughly, and understand more correctly, the true principles of medical science.

DAN KING.

Taunton, Mass., June 1, 1858.

CONTENTS.



Page.
CHAPTER I.
Sketch of Medical History,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
9
CHAPTER II.
Homœopathy—Its Origin, Principles, Attenuations, &c. Carbo Vegetabilis,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
22
CHAPTER III.
Homœopathy—Carbonate of Lime—its uses. Only one article to be used at a time. Provings, Homoeopathic Arguments, &c
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
44
CHAPTER IV.
Homœopathy—Indications of Nature; Belladonna in Scarlatina; Necessity of Attenuated Doses; best Dose always the smallest; Common Salt; Silex; Arsenic,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
59
CHAPTER V.
Homœopathy—Olfaction; Extracts from Prof. Simpson; Considerations, &c. &c
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
75
CHAPTER VI.
Homœopathy—Testimony in favor of Homœopathy considered; Different kinds of Witness required to prove different matters; Witches, &c.
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
87
CHAPTER VII.
Homœopathy—Development of Power by Attenuation; "Small Dose," by William Sharp, M.D., F.R.S., &c; Consumption cured by Dr. Nunez with the six thousandth Attenuation of Sulphur; the exact Remedy of Homoeopathy considered; Danger of Homœopathists who depart from the Rules laid down by Hahnemann, &c.
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
94
CHAPTER VIII.
Homœopathy—Amulets; Royal Touch; Perkinsism; Medical Experience often unreliable ; Homœopathic Cures illusory, &c. &c.
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
110
CHAPTER IX.
Homœopathy—No uniformity in Homoeopathic Practice; Libraries; Influence of Homœopathy upon Medical Practice,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
127
CHAPTER X.
Homœopathic Theology,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
134
CHAPTER XI.
Homœopathy—Its Changes and unsettled Condition; Dr. Hering's Sentiments; Worth of Homoeopathic Practice; Anecdote by Dr. Mead; Danger from Homoeopathy; Saliva of Boa Constrictor, &c. &c.
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
147
CHAPTER XII.
Homœopathy in Europe,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
157
CHAPTER XIII.
Concluding Remarks upon Homoeopathy,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
166
CHAPTER XIV.
Extracts from the Encyclopœdia Britannica and London Medical Circular,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
177
CHAPTER XV.
Hydropathy,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
183
CHAPTER XVI.
Thomsonism,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
200
CHAPTER XVII.
Female Physicians,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
210
CHAPTER XVIII.
Indian Medicine,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
216
CHAPTER XIX.
Eclecticism,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
221
CHAPTER XX.
Chrono-Thermalism,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
236
CHAPTER XXI.
Natural Bone-Setters,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
241
CHAPTER XXII.
The Press,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
247
CHAPTER XXIII.
Female Influence,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
259
CHAPTER XXIV.
Professional Discord,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
265
CHAPTER XXV.
Clerical Influence,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
212
CHAPTER XXVI.
Vagrant Quacks,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
283
CHAPTER XXVII.
Nostrum Recommendations,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
287
CHAPTER XXVIII.
Allopathy,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
297
CHAPTER XXIX.
The low Standard of Professional Acquirement,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
301
CHAPTER XXX.
The Insufficiency of Medicine to accomplish all that the Public require,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
307
CHAPTER XXXI.
Reflections,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
313
Regular and Irregular Practitioners in the United States,
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
332

This work was published before January 1, 1924, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.