Remove United States District Attorney Carmen Ortiz from office for overreach in the case of Aaron Swartz

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Remove United States District Attorney Carmen Ortiz from office for overreach in the case of Aaron Swartz


Remove United States District Attorney Carmen Ortiz from office for overreach in the case of Aaron Swartz

We the People

January 12, 2013

WE PETITION THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION TO:

Remove United States District Attorney Carmen Ortiz from office for overreach in the case of Aaron Swartz.

It is too late to do anything for Aaron Swartz, but the who used the powers granted to them by their office to hound him into a position where he was facing a ruinous trial, life in prison and the ignominy and shame of being a convicted felon; for an alleged crime that the supposed victims did not wish to prosecute.

A prosecutor who does not understand proportionality and who regularly uses the threat of unjust and overreaching charges to extort plea bargains from defendants regardless of their guilt is a danger to the life and liberty of anyone who might cross her path.

http://lessig.tumblr.com/post/40347463044/prosecutor-as-bully

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/13/technology/aaron-swartz-internet-activist-dies-at-26.html

Created: Jan 12, 2013

Issues: Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement, Government Reform, Technology and Telecommunications

SIGNATURES NEEDED BY FEBRUARY 11, 2013 TO REACH GOAL OF 25,0000: 0.

TOTAL SIGNATURES ON THIS PETITION: 60,873.

Response to We the People Petitions on U.S. Attorney's Office Personnel Matters[edit]

Aaron Swartz's death was a tragic, unthinkable loss for his family and friends. Our sympathy continues to go out to those who were closest to him, and to the many others whose lives he touched.

We also reaffirm our belief that a spirit of openness is what makes the Internet such a powerful engine for economic growth, technological innovation, and new ideas. That's why members of the Administration continue to engage with advocates to ensure the Internet remains a free and open platform as technology continues to disrupt industries and connect our communities in ways we can't yet imagine. We will continue this engagement as we tackle new questions on key issues such as citizen participation in democracy, open access to information, privacy, intellectual property, free speech, and security.

As to the specific personnel-related requests raised in your petitions, our response must be limited. Consistent with the terms we laid out when we began We the People, we will not address agency personnel matters in a petition response, because we do not believe this is the appropriate forum in which to do so.

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).