Tag

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Tag or The Chien Boule Dog  (1909) 
by Valance J Patriarche

Newlyweds on their honeymoon accidentally take possession of a young orphan boy and his dog.

Publisher's advertisement, 1909:
An amusing story of a newly married couple, whose honeymoon is interrupted by the appearance of a lost child, and a dog, decidedly a dog. The young wife, whose kindly interest in the forlorn little fellow traveller, "Bateese " and his "Chien Boule Dog," results in all sorts of complications, the young husband, and last, though not least, the boy, "Bateese," who is sublimely unconscious of being the central figure in what proves almost a tragedy (at least from the point of view of a man cheated out of his honeymoon) are all drawn with a fine humor.
The story is an exquisite bit of humor which will be read again and again.

Cover (Tag, August 1909) - cleaned.png

TAG;
OR, THE CHIEN BOULE DOG

Frontispiece (Tag, August 1909).png

"A WILD THREE-CORNERED CONVERSATION ENSUED." (See page 7.)

TAG

OR

THE CHIEN BOULE DOG
BY
VALANCE PATRIARCHE
ILLUSTRATED BY

WALLACE GOLDSMITH

Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons, Ltd logo.png
L. C. PAGE & COMPANY
BOSTON, MDCCCCIX

Copyright, 1909,
By L. C. Page & Company
(INCORPORATED)


Entered at Stationers’ Hall, London


All rights reserved

First Impression, August, 1909

Electrotyped and Printed by
THE COLONIAL PRESS
C. H. Simonds & Co., Boston, U.S.A.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

  1. PAGE
  2. A wild three-cornered conversation ensued.” (see page 7).
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    Frontispiece
  3. Each . . . having a cardboard tag attached to his neck”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    2
  4. It became a banquet of a more substantial order”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    9
  5. Bateese became smiling and amiable at once”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    10
  6. Still Bateese remained fatherless”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    18
  7. Officials were interviewed”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    19
  8. Started in pursuit”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    29
  9. He therefore regretted he could not accommodate them”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    31
  10. A shout of hilarious mirth went up from the bystanders”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    35
  11. Danced noiselessly round the room”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    42
  12. “‘I whaled that carrot-head good an’ hard’”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    47
  13. Josephine . . . waved a dirty paw airily”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    51
  14. He paused with dramatic effect”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    58
  15. It was quite a friendly party which discussed the event of the day”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    65
  16. Just then a street piano struck up a lively tune”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    85
  17. She stood at the door of a shop”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    90
  18. The group which soon gathered gathered about the window”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    100
  19. She looked anxiously at the distracted parent”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    116
  20. They drove along the country road”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    126
  21. The two men emerged arm in arm”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    131
  22. Watching a departing train”
    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
    137

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1927.


The author died in 1970, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 50 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.