The American Cyclopædia (1879)/Tauchnitz

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TAUCHNITZ. I. Karl Christoph Traugott, a German publisher, born at Grosspardau, near Grimma, Oct. 29, 1761, died in Leipsic, Jan. 14, 1836. He learned the printer's trade at Leipsic, and worked in the celebrated printing house of Unger in Berlin. In 1792 he entered the house of Sommer in Leipsic, and in 1796 established in that city the house long known by his name. He began with a small printing house, but in 1798 opened a bookstore in connection with it, and in 1800 a type foundery. In 1809 he published the first volumes of a series of Greek and Latin classics, which, from their accuracy, cheapness, and convenient size, became very popular. He also published some very perfect editions of classical authors in folio. In 1816 he established the first stereotype foundery in Germany; and he was the first to stereotype music. His edition of Mozart's Don Giovanni had a wide popularity. He also printed stereotype editions of oriental works, including two of the Hebrew Bible, and an edition of the Koran. II. Karl Christian Philipp, son of the preceding, born in Leipsic, March 4, 1798. He enlarged his father's business, and carried it on with success until he retired in 1865. Besides many celebrated and important philological publications, he completed in 1840 Fürst's edition of the Hebrew concordance. III. Christian Bernhard, baron, a German publisher, cousin of the preceding, born Aug. 25, 1816. He founded in Leipsic in 1837 a publishing house, which has become celebrated by the issue of a collection of English works, well known as the “Tauchnitz editions,” of which more than 1,000 volumes had been published in 1868, of more than 120 English authors; a copyright for the continent being secured for the more recent works. In 1866 he began the publication of a series of German authors for the use of English-speaking people. In 1860 the title of baron was conferred upon him by the duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, and his title was recognized by the king of Saxony in 1861.