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The Boston News-Letter/Number 1

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Original Typesetting (long s)[edit]

N. E. Numb. 1.

The Boſton News-Letter.[edit]

Publiſhed by Authority.

From Monday April 17. to Monday April 24. 1704.

London Flying-Poſt from Decemb. 2d. to 4th. 1703.[edit]

LEtters from Scotland bring us the Copy of a Sheet lately Printed there, Intituled, A ſeaſonable Alarm for Scotland. In a Letter from a Gentleman in the City, to his Friend in the Country, concerning the preſent Danger of the Kingdom and of the Protestant Religion.

This Letter takes Notice, That Papiſts ſwarm in that Nation, that they traffick more avowedly than formerly, & that of late many Scores of Prieſts and Jeſuites are come thither from France, and gone to the North, to the Highlands & other places of the Country. That the Miniſters of the Highlands and North gave in large Liſts of them to the Committee of the General Aſſembly, to be laid before the Privy-Council.

It likewiſe obſerves, that a great Number of other ill-affected perſons are come over from France, under pretence of accepting her Majeſty’s Gracious Indemnity; but, in reality, to increaſe Diviſions in the Nation, and to entertain a Correſpondence with France: That their ill Intentions are evident from their talking big, their owning the Intereſt of the pretended King James VIII. Their ſecret Cabals, and their buying up of Arms and Ammunition, wherever they can find them.

To this he adds the late Writings and Actings of ſome diſaffected perſons, many of whom are for that Pretender, that ſeveral of them have declar‘d they had rather embrace Popery than conform to the preſent Government; that they refuſe to pray for the Queen, but uſe the ambiguous word Soveraign, and ſome of them pray in expreſs Words for the King and Royal Family; and the charitable and generous Prince who has ſhew‘d them ſo much Kindneſs. He likewiſe takes notice of Letters not long ago found in Cypher, and directed to a Person lately come thither from St. Germains.

He ſays that the greateſt Jacobites, who will not qualifie themſelves by taking the Oaths to Her Majeſty, do now with the Papiſts and their Companions from St Germains ſet up for the Liberty of the Subject, contrary to their own Principles, but meerly to keep up a Diviſion in the Nation. He adds, that they aggravate thoſe things which the People complain of, as to Englands refuſing to allow them a freedom of Trade, &c. and do all they can to foment Diviſions betwixt the Nations and to obſtruct a Redreſs of thoſe things complain‘d of.

The Jacobites, he ſays, do all they can to perſwade the Nation that their pretended King is a Proteſtant in his Heart, tho’ he dares not declare it while under the Power of France; that he is acquainted with the Miſtakes of his Father‘s Government, will govern us more according to Law, and endear himſelf to his Subjects.

They magnifie the Strength of their own Party, and the Weakneſs and Diviſions of the other, in order to facilitate and haſten their Undertaking; they argue themſelves out of their Fears, and into the higheſt aſſurance of accompliſhing their purpoſe.

From all this he infers, That they have hopes of Aſſiſtance from France, otherwiſe they would never be ſo impudent; and he gives Reaſons for his Apprehenſions that the French King may ſend Troops thither this Winter, 1. Becauſe the Engliſh & Dutch will not then be at Sea to oppoſe them. 2. He can then beſt ſpare them, the Seaſon of Action beyond Sea being over. 3. The Expectation given him of a conſiderable number to joyn them, may incourage him to the undertaking with fewer Men if he can but ſend over a ſufficient number of Officers with Arms and Ammunition.

He endeavours in the reſt of his Letters to anſwer the fooliſh Pretences of the Pretender’s being a Proteſtant, and that he will govern us according to Law. He ſays, that being bred up in the Religion and Politicks of France, he is by Education a ſtated Enemy to our Liberty and Religion. That the Obligations which he and his Family owe to the French King, muſt neceſſarily make him to be wholly at his Devotion, and to follow his Example; that if he ſit upon the Throne, the three Nations; muſt be oblig‘d to pay the Debt which he owes the French King for the Education of himſelf, and for Entertaining his ſuppoſed Father and his Family. And ſince the King muſt reſtore him by his Troops, if ever he be reſtored, he will ſee to ſecure his own Debt before thoſe Troops leave Britain. The Pretender being a good Proficient in the French and Romiſh Schools, he will never think himſelf ſufficiently aveng‘d, but by the utter Ruine of his Proteſtant Subjects, both as Hereticks and Traitors. The late Queen, his pretended Mother, who in cold Blood when ſhe was Queen of Britain, adviſed to turn the Weſt of Scotland into a hunting Field will be then for doing ſo by the greateſt part of the Nation; and, no doubt, is at Pains to have her pretended Son educated to her own Mind: Therefore, he ſays, it were a great Madneſs in the Nation to take a Prince bred up in the horrid School of Ingratitude, Perſecution and Cruelty, and filled with Rage and Envy. The Jacobites, he ſays, both in Scotland and at St. Germains, are impatient under their preſent Straits, and knowing their Circumſtances cannot be much worſe than they are, at preſent, are the more inclinable to the Undertaking. He adds, That the French King knows there cannot be a more effectual way for himſelf to arrive at the Univerſal Monarchy, and to ruine the Proteſtant Intereſt, than by ſetting up the Pretender upon the Throne of Great Britain, he will in all probability attempt it; and tho’ he ſhould be perſwaded that the Deſign would miſcarry in the cloſe, yet he cannot but reap ſome Advantage by imbroiling the three Nations.

From all this the Author concludes it to be the Intereſt of the Nation, to provide for Self defence; and ſays, that as many have already taken the Alarm, and are furniſhing themſelves with Arms and Ammunition, he hopes the Government will not only allow it, but encourage it, ſince the Nation ought all to appear as one Man in the Defence of our Gracious Soveraign the Queen, and her juſt Right and Title to the Crown, againſt the Bloody Deſigns of Papiſts and Jacobites.

Dublin Nov. 27.[edit]

A Speech was made by a Member of Parliament, ſetting forth the great Danger the Proteſtants were in, in ſome parts of Ireland, particularly in the County of Limrick where the Iriſh were beginning to form themſelves into Bodies, and to plunder the Proteſtants of their Arms and Money. And that the diſaffected here held a Correſpondence with thoſe in England, and were not out of hopes of reſtoring the pretended Prince of Wales.

There is no doubt but there is a Deſign among the Papiſts to do miſchief, and it may be juſtly ſaid they have begun already; for Letters yeſterday ſay that a Body of Papiſts had got together in the County of Limerick, had marched in a hoſtile manner through the ſeveral Towns, particularly Askeiting, and had Plunder’d and diſarm’d ſeveral Proteſtants, and killed one Green, a Proteſtant, for appearing as a Witneſs in the firſt Court of Claims againſt one Tady O’Quin, an Iriſh Papiſt. It’s ſaid there are ſeveral more little Parties of Iriſh up in that Country, which put the Proteſtants in a mighty Conſternation.

London Gazette Decemb. 16. to 20th. 1703. Weſtminſter, December. 17.[edit]

HEr Majeſty came this day to the Houſe of Peers, attended with a uſual Solemnity; and being Seated on the Throne in Her Royal Robes, Sir David Mitchel Gentleman Uſher of the Black Rod, was ſent with a Meſſage to the Houſe of Commons, requiring their Attendance in the Houſe of Peers, whither they came accordingly; And Her Majeſty was pleaſed to give the Royal Aſſent to An Act for Granting an Aid to Her Majeſty by a Land Tax, to be raiſed in the Year, One thouſand ſeven hundred and four.

After which Her Majeſty made the following moſt Gracious Speech to both Houſes.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

I Think it proper upon this Occaſion to acquaint you, That I have had Unqueſtionable Informations of very ill Practices and Deſigns carried on in Scotland by Emiſſaries from France, which might have proved extreamly Dangerous to the Peace of theſe Kingdoms, as you will ſee by the Particulars, which ſhall be laid before you as ſoon as the ſeveral Examinations relating to this Matter can be fully perfected, and made publick without Prejudice: In the mean time, I make no Doubt, but by this Seaſonable Diſcovery I ſhall be able to give ſuch Directions for Our Security, as will Effectually Prevent any ill Conſequence from theſe Pernicious Deſigns.

Gentlemen of the Houſe of Commons,

I am very Senſible of your great Readineß and affection for the Publick Service, by Preſenting Me ſo early in the Seſſion with a conſiderable Part of your Supplies; I depend entirely upon your Continuing with the ſame Zeal to diſpatch the Remainder of them; that ſo we may be Prepared to give the ſpeedieſt Aſſiſtance to Our Allies, and to defeat the malicious Deſigns of Our Enemies; who cannot be more Induſtrious to Contrive the Ruine of this Kingdom, and of the Proteſtant Religion, than I ſhall always be Vigilant and Careful, both for their preſent Preſervation, and for their future Security.

Boston, April. 18.[edit]

Arrived Capt. Sill from Jamacia about 4 Weeks Paſſage, ſays they continue there very Sickly. Mr. Nathaniel Oliver a principal Merchant of this place died April 15 & was decently inter’d April. 18. Ætatis 53.


The Honourable Col. Nathanael Byfield Eſq. Is Commiſſioned Judge of the Admiralty for the Provinces of Maſſachuſetts-Bay, New-Hampſhire and Rhod-Iſland. And Thomas Newton Eſq. Judge-Deputy for the Colony of Maſſachuſetts-Bay.

The 20.[edit]

the Rd. Mr. Pemberton Preach’d an Excellent Sermon on 1 Theſ 4 11. And do your own buſineſs: Exhorting all Ranks & Degrees of Perſons to do their own work, in order to a REFORMATION: which His Excellency has ordered to be Printed.

The 21.[edit]

His Excellency Diſſolved the Gen. Aſſembly.

Rhode-Iſland 22.[edit]

The Rd. Mr. Lockyer dyed on Thurſ. Laſt.


Capt. Toungrello has taken Five Prizes off of Curraſo, one of which is come in to Rhode-Iſland moſtly Loaden with Cocco, Tobacco, Liquors &c. She is a Curraſo Trader, as all the reſt were. One of the Five was one Larew a French-man, a Sloop of 8 Guns & 8 Patteraro’s 76 Men, Fought him Board and Board three Glaſſes; Captain Larew was kill’d and 20 of his Men kill’d & wounded: Capt. Toungrello wounded thro’ the Body, and five of his men, but none kill’d, he had but 40 Fighting Men, when he took Larew.

The 18[edit]

Currant, came in a Sloop to this Port from Virginia, the Maſter informed Governour Cranſton Eſq. he was Chaſed by a Topſail Shallop off of Block-Iſland, which he judged to be a French Privateer, and that there was two other Veſſels in her Company, which he judged to be her Prizes. Whereupon his Honour being concerning for the Publick Weal and Safety of Her Majeſties good Subjects, immediately cauſed the Drum to beat for Voluntiers, under the Command of Capt. Wanton, and in 3 or four hours time, Fitted and Man’d a Brigantine, with 70 brisk young men well Arm’d, who Sail’d the following Night, returned laſt Evening, and gave his Honour an Account, that they found the aforeſaid Shallop, with one other, and a Ketch at Tarpolian Cove, who were all Fiſhing Veſſels belonging to Marblehead or Salem, who were Fiſhing off of Block-Iſland, one of them was a French built Shallop with a Topſail, which gave the great ſuſpician that they were Enemies.

New-York, April, 17.[edit]

By a Barque from Jamacia, (laſt from Barmuda, 7 Weeks Paſſage,) ſays, there was an Imbargo in that Iſland ſeveral Months, occaſioned by News they had of a deſign the French & Spaniards had, to make a deſcent upon them: She came out with the Homeward bound London Fleet, who are gone home without Convoy.


Capt. Daviſon in the Eagle Gally, Sailes for London, in a Month, if the Virginia Fleet ſtays ſo long; he intends to keep them Company Home, if not, to run for it, being Built for that Service.

Philadelphia, April, 14.[edit]

An Account that the Dreadnaught Man of War was Arrived in Marryland.

N. London, April, 20.[edit]

The Adventure, A Veſſel 60 Tuns, will Sail from thence to London, in three Weeks or a Months time.

Advertiſement.[edit]

THis News-Letter is to be continued Weekly; and all Perſons who have any Houſes, Lands, Tenements, Farms, Ships, Veſſels, Goods, Wares or Merchandizes, &c. to be Sold, or Let; or Servants Run-away, or Goods Stole or Loſt; may have the ſame inſerted at a Reaſonable Rate, from Twelve Pence to Five Shillings, and not to exceed: Who may agree with John Campbel Poſt-maſter of Boſton.

All Perſons in Town and Country, may have ſaid News-Letter every Week, Yearly, upon reaſonable terms, agreeing with John Campbel, Poſt-maſter for the ſame.


Boſton: Printed by B. Green. Sold by Nicholas Boone, at his Shop near the Old Meeting-Houſe.

Modern Typesetting (short s)[edit]

N. E. Numb. 1.

The Boston News-Letter.[edit]

Published by Authority.

From Monday April 17. to Monday April 24. 1704.

London Flying-Post from Decemb. 2d. to 4th. 1703.[edit]

Letters from Scotland bring us the Copy of a Sheet lately Printed there, Intituled, A seasonable Alarm for Scotland. In a Letter from a Gentleman in the City, to his Friend in the Country, concerning the present Danger of the Kingdom and of the Protestant Religion.

This Letter takes Notice, That Papists swarm in that Nation, that they traffick more avowedly than formerly, & that of late many Scores of Priests and Jesuites are come thither from France, and gone to the North, to the Highlands & other places of the Country. That the Ministers of the Highlands and North gave in large Lists of them to the Committee of the General Assembly, to be laid before the Privy-Council.

It likewise observes, that a great Number of other ill-affected persons are come over from France, under pretence of accepting her Majesty’s Gracious Indemnity; but, in reality, to increase Divisions in the Nation, and to entertain a Correspondence with France: That their ill Intentions are evident from their talking big, their owning the Interest of the pretended King James VIII. Their secret Cabals, and their buying up of Arms and Ammunition, wherever they can find them.

To this he adds the late Writings and Actings of some disaffected persons, many of whom are for that Pretender, that several of them have declar’d they had rather embrace Popery than conform to the present Government; that they refuse to pray for the Queen, but use the ambiguous word Soveraign, and some of them pray in express Words for the King and Royal Family; and the charitable and generous Prince who has shew’d them so much Kindness. He likewise takes notice of Letters not long ago found in Cypher, and directed to a Person lately come thither from St. Germains.

He says that the greatest Jacobites, who will not qualifie themselves by taking the Oaths to Her Majesty, do now with the Papists and their Companions from St Germains set up for the Liberty of the Subject, contrary to their own Principles, but meerly to keep up a Division in the Nation. He adds, that they aggravate those things which the People complain of, as to Englands refusing to allow them a freedom of Trade, &c. and do all they can to foment Divisions betwixt the Nations and to obstruct a Redress of those things complain’d of.

The Jacobites, he says, do all they can to perswade the Nation that their pretended King is a Protestant in his Heart, tho’ he dares not declare it while under the Power of France; that he is acquainted with the Mistakes of his Father’s Government, will govern us more according to Law, and endear himself to his Subjects.

They magnifie the Strength of their own Party, and the Weakness and Divisions of the other, in order to facilitate and hasten their Undertaking; they argue themselves out of their Fears, and into the highest assurance of accomplishing their purpose.

From all this he infers, That they have hopes of Assistance from France, otherwise they would never be so impudent; and he gives Reasons for his Apprehensions that the French King may send Troops thither this Winter, 1. Because the English & Dutch will not then be at Sea to oppose them. 2. He can then best spare them, the Season of Action beyond Sea being over. 3. The Expectation given him of a considerable number to joyn them, may incourage him to the undertaking with fewer Men if he can but send over a sufficient number of Officers with Arms and Ammunition.

He endeavours in the rest of his Letters to answer the foolish Pretences of the Pretender’s being a Protestant, and that he will govern us according to Law. He says, that being bred up in the Religion and Politicks of France, he is by Education a stated Enemy to our Liberty and Religion. That the Obligations which he and his Family owe to the French King, must necessarily make him to be wholly at his Devotion, and to follow his Example; that if he sit upon the Throne, the three Nations; must be oblig’d to pay the Debt which he owes the French King for the Education of himself, and for Entertaining his supposed Father and his Family. And since the King must restore him by his Troops, if ever he be restored, he will see to secure his own Debt before those Troops leave Britain. The Pretender being a good Proficient in the French and Romish Schools, he will never think himself sufficiently aveng’d, but by the utter Ruine of his Protestant Subjects, both as Hereticks and Traitors. The late Queen, his pretended Mother, who in cold Blood when she was Queen of Britain, advised to turn the West of Scotland into a hunting Field will be then for doing so by the greatest part of the Nation; and, no doubt, is at Pains to have her pretended Son educated to her own Mind: Therefore, he says, it were a great Madness in the Nation to take a Prince bred up in the horrid School of Ingratitude, Persecution and Cruelty, and filled with Rage and Envy. The Jacobites, he says, both in Scotland and at St. Germains, are impatient under their present Straits, and knowing their Circumstances cannot be much worse than they are, at present, are the more inclinable to the Undertaking. He adds, That the French King knows there cannot be a more effectual way for himself to arrive at the Universal Monarchy, and to ruine the Protestant Interest, than by setting up the Pretender upon the Throne of Great Britain, he will in all probability attempt it; and tho’ he should be perswaded that the Design would miscarry in the close, yet he cannot but reap some Advantage by imbroiling the three Nations.

From all this the Author concludes it to be the Interest of the Nation, to provide for Self defence; and says, that as many have already taken the Alarm, and are furnishing themselves with Arms and Ammunition, he hopes the Government will not only allow it, but encourage it, since the Nation ought all to appear as one Man in the Defence of our Gracious Soveraign the Queen, and her just Right and Title to the Crown, against the Bloody Designs of Papists and Jacobites.

Dublin Nov. 27.[edit]

A Speech was made by a Member of Parliament, setting forth the great Danger the Protestants were in, in some parts of Ireland, particularly in the County of Limrick where the Irish were beginning to form themselves into Bodies, and to plunder the Protestants of their Arms and Money. And that the disaffected here held a Correspondence with those in England, and were not out of hopes of restoring the pretended Prince of Wales.

There is no doubt but there is a Design among the Papists to do mischief, and it may be justly said they have begun already; for Letters yesterday say that a Body of Papists had got together in the County of Limerick, had marched in a hostile manner through the several Towns, particularly Askeiting, and had Plunder’d and disarm’d several Protestants, and killed one Green, a Protestant, for appearing as a Witness in the first Court of Claims against one Tady O’Quin, an Irish Papist. It’s said there are several more little Parties of Irish up in that Country, which put the Protestants in a mighty Consternation.

London Gazette Decemb. 16. to 20th. 1703. Westminster, December. 17.[edit]

Her Majesty came this day to the House of Peers, attended with a usual Solemnity; and being Seated on the Throne in Her Royal Robes, Sir David Mitchel Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, was sent with a Message to the House of Commons, requiring their Attendance in the House of Peers, whither they came accordingly; And Her Majesty was pleased to give the Royal Assent to An Act for Granting an Aid to Her Majesty by a Land Tax, to be raised in the Year, One thousand seven hundred and four.

After which Her Majesty made the following most Gracious Speech to both Houses.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

I Think it proper upon this Occasion to acquaint you, That I have had Unquestionable Informations of very ill Practices and Designs carried on in Scotland by Emissaries from France, which might have proved extreamly Dangerous to the Peace of these Kingdoms, as you will see by the Particulars, which shall be laid before you as soon as the several Examinations relating to this Matter can be fully perfected, and made publick without Prejudice: In the mean time, I make no Doubt, but by this Seasonable Discovery I shall be able to give such Directions for Our Security, as will Effectually Prevent any ill Consequence from these Pernicious Designs.

Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

I am very Sensible of your great Readiness and affection for the Publick Service, by Presenting Me so early in the Session with a considerable Part of your Supplies; I depend entirely upon your Continuing with the same Zeal to dispatch the Remainder of them; that so we may be Prepared to give the speediest Assistance to Our Allies, and to defeat the malicious Designs of Our Enemies; who cannot be more Industrious to Contrive the Ruine of this Kingdom, and of the Protestant Religion, than I shall always be Vigilant and Careful, both for their present Preservation, and for their future Security.

Boston, April. 18.[edit]

Arrived Capt. Sill from Jamacia about 4 Weeks Passage, says they continue there very Sickly. Mr. Nathaniel Oliver a principal Merchant of this place died April 15 & was decently inter’d April. 18. Ætatis 53.


The Honourable Col. Nathanael Byfield Esq. Is Commissioned Judge of the Admiralty for the Provinces of Massachusetts-Bay, New-Hampshire and Rhod-Island. And Thomas Newton Esq. Judge-Deputy for the Colony of Massachusetts-Bay.

The 20.[edit]

the Rd. Mr. Pemberton Preach’d an Excellent Sermon on 1 Thes 4 11. And do your own business: Exhorting all Ranks & Degrees of Persons to do their own work, in order to a REFORMATION: which His Excellency has ordered to be Printed.

The 21.[edit]

His Excellency Dissolved the Gen. Assembly.

Rhode-Island 22.[edit]

The Rd. Mr. Lockyer dyed on Thurs. Last.


Capt. Toungrello has taken Five Prizes off of Curraso, one of which is come in to Rhode-Island mostly Loaden with Cocco, Tobacco, Liquors &c. She is a Curraso Trader, as all the rest were. One of the Five was one Larew a French-man, a Sloop of 8 Guns & 8 Patteraro’s 76 Men, Fought him Board and Board three Glasses; Captain Larew was kill’d and 20 of his Men kill’d & wounded: Capt. Toungrello wounded thro’ the Body, and five of his men, but none kill’d, he had but 40 Fighting Men, when he took Larew.

The 18[edit]

Currant, came in a Sloop to this Port from Virginia, the Master informed Governour Cranston Esq. he was Chased by a Topsail Shallop off of Block-Island, which he judged to be a French Privateer, and that there was two other Vessels in her Company, which he judged to be her Prizes. Whereupon his Honour being concerning for the Publick Weal and Safety of Her Majesties good Subjects, immediately caused the Drum to beat for Voluntiers, under the Command of Capt. Wanton, and in 3 or four hours time, Fitted and Man’d a Brigantine, with 70 brisk young men well Arm’d, who Sail’d the following Night, returned last Evening, and gave his Honour an Account, that they found the aforesaid Shallop, with one other, and a Ketch at Tarpolian Cove, who were all Fishing Vessels belonging to Marblehead or Salem, who were Fishing off of Block-Island, one of them was a French built Shallop with a Topsail, which gave the great suspician that they were Enemies.

New-York, April, 17.[edit]

By a Barque from Jamacia, (last from Barmuda, 7 Weeks Passage,) says, there was an Imbargo in that Island several Months, occasioned by News they had of a design the French & Spaniards had, to make a descent upon them: She came out with the Homeward bound London Fleet, who are gone home without Convoy.


Capt. Davison in the Eagle Gally, Sailes for London, in a Month, if the Virginia Fleet stays so long; he intends to keep them Company Home, if not, to run for it, being Built for that Service.

Philadelphia, April, 14.[edit]

An Account that the Dreadnaught Man of War was Arrived in Marryland.

N. London, April, 20.[edit]

The Adventure, A Vessel 60 Tuns, will Sail from thence to London, in three Weeks or a Months time.

Advertisement.[edit]

This News-Letter is to be continued Weekly; and all Persons who have any Houses, Lands, Tenements, Farms, Ships, Vessels, Goods, Wares or Merchandizes, &c. to be Sold, or Let; or Servants Run-away, or Goods Stole or Lost; may have the same inserted at a Reasonable Rate, from Twelve Pence to Five Shillings, and not to exceed: Who may agree with John Campbel Post-master of Boston.

All Persons in Town and Country, may have said News-Letter every Week, Yearly, upon reasonable terms, agreeing with John Campbel, Post-master for the same.


Boston: Printed by B. Green. Sold by Nicholas Boone, at his Shop near the Old Meeting-House.

Source[edit]

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1924. It may be copyrighted outside the U.S. (see Help:Public domain).