The Camel

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L'Estrange's translation (1692)[edit]

A CAMEL AT FIRST SIGHT

Upon the first Sight of a Camel, all People ran from it, in Amazement at so monstrous a Bulk. Upon the second sight, finding that it did them no hurt, they took heart upon’t, went up to’t, and view’d it. But when they came, upon further Experience, to take notice, how stupid a Beast it was, they ty’d it up, bridled it, loaded it with Packs and Burdens, set Boys upon the Back on’t, and treated it with the last Degree of Contempt.

THE MORAL OF THE TWO FABLES ABOVE. Novelty surprizes us, and we have naturally a Horror for uncouth mishapen Monsters; but ‘tis our Ignorance that staggers us, for upon Custom and Experience all these Bugs grow familiar and easy to us.

Townsend's translation (1887)[edit]

The Camel

When man first saw the Camel, he was so frightened at his vast size that he ran away. After a time, perceiving the meekness and gentleness of the beast's temper, he summoned courage enough to approach him. Soon afterwards, observing that he was an animal altogether deficient in spirit, he assumed such boldness as to put a bridle in his mouth, and to let a child drive him.

Use serves to overcome dread.