The Clash of the Wolves

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The Clash of the Wolves  (1925) 
by Noel Mason Smith
A 1925 American silent western film, featuring the World War I dog Rin-Tin-Tin. This film has been selected by the Library of Congress to be included in the first class of films for preservation in the National Film Registry.
Key (info)
Dialogue
In scene
Storyline

a
WARNER BROTHERS

Classic of the Screen

Warner Brothers
Present
RIN-TIN-TIN
in

"Clash of the
Wolves"

by CHARLES A. LOGUE

Directed by NOEL MASON SMITH
a Warner Brothers Classic of the Screen

reviewed by The National Board of Review
copyright MCMXXV
Warner Bros. Pictures Inc.

Photography
ALAN THOMPSON &
E. B. DUPAR
Edited by
CLARENCE KOLSTER
Art Directors
LEWIS GEIB & ESDRAS HARTLEY
Electrical Effects
F. N. MURPHY
Art Titles
VICTOR VANCE

The High Sierras—whose sheltering paradise of green, changes to an inferno of terror——when nature puts on her garments of red.

A half-breed wolf—combining the savage strength of the wild, with the intelligence of his dog ancestry.

Rin-tin-tin.

So skillful and daring that the Rangers had given him the Spanish name for wolf—Lobo.

Lobo's mate, with the mother instinct of the wild, guarding her wolf puppies against the oncoming flames.

Nanette.

Far below the timber line lay the great American Desert——here Lobo and his pack found refuge.

Lobo, in search of prey.

Dave Weston, a lonely tenderfoot prospecting for borax.

Charles Farrell.

DAVE

May Barstowe, daughter of a wealthy ranch owner, who does not share her father's dislike for the lonely prospector.

June Marlowe.

Cupid's assistant—Alkali Bill, teamster on Barlowes's ranch.

… 'Heinie' Conklin.

"Oh! D—a—a—ave!"

"Oh! D—a—a—ave!"

"Be very careful of the cake—I want to surprise Dave."

"I think it's borax—let's take it to town and have it tested."

The hunger call to the rest of the famished pack.

"That sounds like wolves!"

"It can't be wolves—there hain't been none in this desert for twenty years!"

"The fire in the mountains may have driven them down, is search of food."

Thehe Law of the pack—death to the wounded wolf.

"WOLVES!"

"WOLVES! WOLVES!"

WOLVES! WOLVES! WOLVES!
WOLVES! WOLVES! WOLVES!

"The desert is full of wolves—I saw thousands of them!"

"Forty-three of 'em jumped on my neck."

TAXIDERMIST

"Wolves!"

"Wolves!"

Sam Barstowe, May's father, who does not approve of the tenderfoot's attention to his daughter.

William Walling.

"We were attacked by wolves—if it weren't for Dave, we might have been killed."

"Round up the cattle—or the wolves will get 'em!"

WilliamHorton
CHEMIST

Wm. 'Borax' Horton, posing as a chemist, but in reality, a claim jumper.

Pat Hartigan.

"I'm just out of testing fluid——you'll have to wait a couple of weeks for the report."

"By the way, Dave, where did you find this stuff?"

"Out there in the desert—maybe near—maybe far—who knows?"

Barstowe and his men, while rounding up the cattle, found traces everywhere of Lobo's cunning leadership.

"If we catch the leader, we can break up that wolf pack."

But catching a leader as daring as Lobo—was another matter.

With the cunning that had already made him famous, Lobo singles out one steer at a time for attack.

"Quick! The wolves are down in the canyon."

To protect the pack from the revengeful ranchers, Lobo draws the fire on himself.

"I know that wolf! That's the famous Lobo!"

"I'll give one hundred dollars for his hide!"

His foot, pierced by a cactus thorn.

Unable to extract the thorn, Lobo seeks the help of his mate.

Knowing the first sign of weakness means death—Lobo hides his injury.

As the wound grew worse, fear of his brother wolves, drove Lobo into the open—to die alone.

To Lobo, man was his greatest enemy—he expected no mercy.

"Lobo!"

Wondering why Lobo had deserted her and the puppies, the faithful mate waited in wain, for his return.

"Steady, Lobo, I'm only trying to stop the pain."

"I guess you're a tenderfoot, too, in this cactus country—you ought to wear boots!"

Even as, ages ago, the first wolf surrendered to man's love, so Lobo forsook the wild and became Dave's dog.

"You can't fool those horses—they know he's a wolf."

"Don't shoot, Bill—he's tame, now!"

"You'd better get rid of that wolf—he'll scare every horse in town."

"Yes, and if anybody recognizes him they'll shoot him."

"I haven't studied a full detective course, for nothin'."

"We're gettin' by great—nobody recognizes him!"

SHREDDED
COCOANUT
½ lb
For
35¢
SOAP CHIPS
1 lb
For
10¢
APPLES
3 lbs
For
25¢
APRICOTS
2 lbs
For
15¢

"That's fine borax—did you stake out your claim?"

WILLIAM HORTON
CHEMIST

Sample is: To: Mr Dave Weston
Borax
98½%
Grade Good
Fair
Poor

Remarks:

Sample is excellent
and contains very little
foreign substance

Signed William Horton

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

"That's Lobo and I'm goin' to get that reward!"

"Take him out of town quick Dave—I'll see you tonight."

That night a sand storm offered Dave an excuse to "accept" Barstowe's unwilling hospitality.

"S—sh! Not so loud—father's in the next room."

"Have you ever seen this tenderfoot making love to my daughter?"

"The storm's blown the corral fence down."

"If I come back and find them making love—you're fired!"

"I'll give you a kiss, if you don't tell Dad."

"I want a kiss—like Dave gets."

"I'm suspicious of Horton—I must post my claim—the storm will cover my tracks."

There was another on the trail—the faithful mate, who tried constantly, to win Lobo back from civilization.

THIS CLAIM
TO BORAX DEPOSIT
STAKED OUT
BY
DAVE WESTON
SEPT. 4 1925.

"I lost my partner in the storm—I thought I was following his tracks."

May
am injured
follow Lobo
Dave

"Go find her—go find May."

After the storm had lifted.

The command of his master to seek out the girl is overcome by his desire for revenge on Horton.

ROSE HOTEL

Under cover of darkness.

"Something must have happened to Dave!"

"Don't shoot! I've already filed Dave's claim in my name——he must not turn up alive—I'll follow Lobo!"

Following Lobo's tracks.

At a nearby water hole with another canteen from Dave's shack.

WATER HOLE

THIS WATER HOLE
FOR DRINKING
(…)

"Lobo!—Here Lobo!"

"That wolf attacked me!"

"Which way did he go?"

"Get on that horse!"

Wolf heart or human
heart are ever the same—
when love rules.

The End

A Warner Brothers
Classic of the Screen


This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1926.


The author died in 1955, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 60 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.