The Czechoslovak Review/Volume 2/The Slavs

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The Slavs.

By Aleš Hrdlička.

Curator, Division of Physical Anthropology,
U. S. National Museum.

The greatest defect of the Slavs is that that they do not know themselves; and their greatest disadvantage is that others do not know them.

General Account.

The European whites are divisible into four great strains, which are the Nordic, the Alpine, the Mediterranean, and the Slav. Of these the Slav strain is the greatest in numbers.

These strains are sometimes called “races”, which is not quite accurate. They differ from each other in certain features, such as the prevailing shade of the eyes, hair and the skin, in the form of the head, height of body, physiognomy, and even in mentality, but they merge into each other without any fixed lines of demarcation. And they are not equally apart from each other—thus a large proportion of the Slavs is practically identical with the Alpines, while some of the most important characteristics are common to groups which other wise show racial differences. This is, for example, the case with the important feature of the form of the head, which in general is closely alike in the Nordics and the Mediterraneans, who differ so much in mean stature, pigmentation and other particulars. Moreover, these strains are not strictly homogeneous within themselves, their diverse characteristics varying more or less with localities. Thus the Russian and the Jugoslav differ in more than one respect, though remaining alike in essentials. Finally, there is evidence that some of these great strains, if not all, have undergone since historic times, and are still undergoing, gradual alteration in head form, pigmentation, and other features. All of which renders the term “strain”, rather than “race”, as applied to these different groups, the more correct and congruous.

The Slav strain is strictly indigenous to Europe. Due mainly to its present short-headedness there have been suggestions, even by serious men of science, that it may have originated in Asia; but these suggestions remained mere hypotheses. There are no Slavs and no Slav type in Asia, except those of recent immigration. On the other hand strong evidence has been accumulating that, like the rest of Europeans, the Slavs had their origin in the more homogeneous neolithic population of that continent, and that they developed their language, institutions and character in the great region which is drained by the Visla (Vistula) river. It is well known now, for instance, that they carried some of the more important physical characteristics of their stone-age forefathers, such as an oblong head form, well into the historic period. Their language, their myths and traditions, their sedentary habits and devotion to agriculture, are all European.

It is from the regions that later became Poland and Galicia and from the Carpathians, that the Slavs spread, between perhaps as early as 1000 B. C. and the seventh century of our era, over a large part of what is now eastern Germany, over all the territories that eventually became Austria-Hungary and over nearly the whole of the Balkan peninsula; and it is from the same regions that, from the seventh to the nineteenth century, the irresistible flood spread gradually all over what is now European Russia, and eventually over Siberia, Turkestan and the Caucasus.

The fundamental causes of the vast spread of the Slavs against all obstructions are in general as yet imperfectly understood. These causes were not a mere lust of conquest, or of domination, or of rapine. They were, first of all, an important physiological condition which underlies their spread of today, namely a great fertility. They gradually outbred their territorial and other resources, as well as the peoples with whom they were in contact, and when the internal pressure of population rose above the external, they overflowed in all directions of less resistance. Important contributory causes favoring these overflows were ravages of neighboring territories by the various early nordic and eurasic invasions, and internecine wars among the contiguous non-Slav peoples, all of which diminished the resistance to the Slav extension. The whole process of the Slav spread, especially in the earlier times, was thus essentially a natural one or what might be called one of vital competition, radically at variance with the more or less predatory and ephemeral invasions of the Goths, Vandals, Huns, or Teutons, and equally different from such planned and organized military-colonial extensions as those of Rome. That the process was not always peaceful, however, or gentle, we know well from the earlier history of the Balkans.

Once having occupied a new territory the Slavs made this promptly their home. Their universal occupations of agriculture and husbandry constituted them at once true colonists, who soon became firmly rooted to the soil and were hard to displace. In addition they brought qualities of ready adaptation to new conditions as well as to new neighbors, together with other assets which favored a ready assimilation of the remnants of native populations; though in some localities and from the same reasons in the course of time they became assimilated themselves into stronger alien groups.

The Slavs spread until they occupied all the territories between the Baltic and the Ægean and from the Elbe to the Volga and eventually the Far East. In the course of the Middle Ages they lost some of these territories by denationalization. The Slav groups between the Elbe and the lands of the Poles were absorbed by the Germans, those of Pannonia were gradually assimilated in a large measure by the German Austrians, those of the Central bulk of Hungary suffered Magyarization, while in the south and west of the Balkan peninsula gains were made at their expense by the Greeks and Illyrians (Albanians). Some serious results of these changes were the severing of the southern Slavs from the main Slav body by a broad Magyar-German patch; while the westernmost Czechs became hemmed in on three sides by the Germans. But while blocked and suffering losses in the west the Slav strain kept on gaining in eastern Europe and then in Asia, so that the total territory they occupied towards the beginning of the present century was greater than that covered by them ever before in their history.

With the territorial changes and new contacts, however, and in the course of the centuries, some far-reaching internal developments took place in the Slav world. Originally according to all indications they were but one great strain of people of the same blood. They had the same language, the same habits, and the same naturalistic religion, with Perun, the Great Thunderer, as its chief deity. They also had throughout the same family and clan organization, on cherished democratic foundations, but apparently without possessing ever a single central government that would embrace the whole or even large groups of the population. As time advanced, however, and with increasing territorial distances, dialects appeared, and the clans or groups of clans began to form separate streams or bodies, which progressed according to circumstances and in instances by outside intervention, to political and geographic units, more or less independent of each other—the eventual Slav nations and countries. Under the influence of non-Slavic peoples the dialects of these units grew gradually farther apart, detrimental differences in faith were introduced from without, and the groups followed in large measure their separate destinies, at times even contending with each other; but there was never lost a strong basic feeling of common parentage and mutual sympathy, a feeling which in the recent epoch and among the more cultured groups became largely responsible for the so-called Pan-Slavism, the great bug-bear before the war of the guilty conscience of both Germany and AustriaHungary.

The groups which have arisen from the original Slav leaven were (and are) as follows:

SLAVS.
Main Groups. Secondary Groups.

Northern (and Eastern)
The Russians Bielo (White) Russians.
Velko (Great) Russians.
Malo (Little) Russians or Ukrainians, with Červeno (Red) Russians or Ruthenians, the Carpathian tribes of Gorali, and the Ugro-Russians.
Cossacks (particularly those of the Don).
Western (and Central) (Prussian, Pomeranian, Polabian (Elbe) Tribes—extinct).

Poles
of the Kingdom Kashubs
Mazurs, or Masovians
Poles proper
Galicians
(Lusatians, Sorbs or Vends — nearly
extinct).
Czecho-Slovaks.
Slavs of Pannonia, Dacia, Rumania — extinct or small remnants).



Southern
Jugo-Slavs Slovenes
Serbo-Croats Slavonians
Croatians
Dalmatians
Bosnians and Hercegovinians
Serbians and Montenegrins
Macedonians (majority)
Bulgars (with part of Macedonians).
(Slavs of Albania, Epirus, Thessaly etc.—extinct or small remnants).
Numbers.—As to the actual numbers of Slavs in Europe and the inseparable Asiatic provinces of Russia, our figures are not as precise or uniformly up-to-date as desirable. In Austria-Hungary in particular the German and Magyar governments have, as well known, for decades now made it impossible to obtain anything like a just census of the Slavic population. Nevertheless there are sufficient data and knowledge of conditions to enable us to arrive at close approximations, which, with the numerical strength of other European groups, are given in the following columns:[1]
  1. Based on the Russian and Finnish Statistical Annuals up to 1915; on the Austrian census of 1910 and Czech corrections of same; and on latest censuses of the rest of the Slavic countries, with estimates up-to-date, based on the known mean annual accretion of each group. With some assistance from Almanach of Gotha and Statesman’s Year Book of latest editions.
SLAVS CONTRASTED WITH OTHER POPULATIONS IN EUROPE.
(In round numbers, and regardless of political boundaries.)
Millions.
Slavs in Europe—145–150 millions or 34.5 per cent.
Northern (and Eastern) Russians (all subdivisions). Europe
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
102
(besides which in Siberia)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
Western (and Central)—
Poles
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
Czecho-Slovaks
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
Lusatians and other remnants
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
(negligible)
Southern—
Jugo-Slavs and related Macedonians
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11
Bulgars and related Macedonians
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
Nordic, Anglo-Saxon, German—144–18 millions, or 34 per cent.
Scandinavians, Danes
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
Dutch, Flemish
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
English, Scotch
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
44
Germans, German Austro-Hungarians
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
80
French, Latin, Mediterranean—123–127 millions, or 29 per cent.
French, Belgian (Walloon)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
46
Spanish, Portuguese
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
26
Italians
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
Rumanians
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11
Greeks
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
Others—10–12 millions, or 3 per cent.
Albanians, Basques, Caucasians, Gipsies, Kelts, Turks, etc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11

Admixture of Blood.—According to all indications the Slavs began and for a long period of time remained, physically as well as otherwise, a homogeneous or but slightly mixed group. But once they commenced to spread from their original territory and through several invasions of parts of their territory from outside, they encountered various non-Slav populations, with all of which in the course of events they mixed to a greater or lesser degree.

Thus, to the north they absorbed much of the otherwise related Lithuanian and Lett elements, and a proportion of Scandinavians (Variags, Swedes). Farther north and northeast they penetrated extensively and mixed with the eurasic Finnic and Ugro-Finnic groups which occupied these regions before them. To the east, southeast and over nearly all of southern Russia, they were in centuries-long contact and struggles with various eurasic populations belonging for the most part to the Turco-Tartar strain (Scythian, Chazar, Hun, Kuman, Petcheneg, Bulgar and Tatar groups), and assimilated a large portion of these. Here they also came in contact with the Mongols who, in their turn, left traces of their admixture. Over southwestern Russia they were in prolonged contact with the invading Nordic Goths and some related groups and these also left some remnants. In the northwest and west the Slavs probably incorporated some Germanic elements, but here it was where the Slavs themselves suffered a great absorption. In the center they remained relatively pure, except in Bohemia, Moravia and Silesia, where some German mixture developed. Over the ancient Pannonia, Dacia, and the more modern Rumania, it was again the Slavs that merged into other populations. Finally in the south they assimilated the remnants of the Balkan Thraco-Illyrians, and mixed with Latins, Greeks, Turks, Kumans, Albanians and Kuco-Vlachs or Balkan Rumanians.

All of these admixtures could not but leave effects, which are more or less manifest today in the different Slav groups. They are most marked among some of the Bulgarians, and perhaps among the Ukrainians, the Russians in the Ugro-Finnic territory, and the Cossacks; but excepting limited localities they were in no case sufficient to obscure the general physical and mental Slav type of the population. Individuals however, who resemble more a Norseman, Finn, Tartar, German, Italian, or Turk, than a pure Slav, are, especially in some localities, not uncommon.

General Characteristics of the Slavs (A) Physical.—The prevalent somatic Slav type is characterized by medium to above medium stature, good chest, neck, back and limb development, relatively broad (subbrachy—to brachycephalic) head, medium broad to rather broad and not sharply or finely chiseled face, concave to straight medium broad nose, medium to slightly above medium lips, well developed strong teeth, dental arches and chin, and a tendency to some largeness or prominence of the cheek bones. Among the men there may also be noted occasional tendency to a prominence of the angles of the lower jaw. The skin is as in other central Europeans, never swarthy except in those with Mediterranean or other darker admixture. The hair and beard in their general characteristics are also as in other Europeans, though the growth of hair as well as that of beard seems to be especially favored by nature among the Russians. The prevalent hair color in the north is grizzly to brown, but as one proceeds westward and southwest darker shades increase in frequency. Lighter shades of hair occur (especially light brown), but real blondness in an unmixed Slav would be an anomaly. The color of the eyes ranges in the main from gray to brown. Blue eyes occur also, but somewhat exceptionally. The teeth on the whole are probably more regular and better preserved than in the more western European and particularly the Anglo-Saxon populations. The women are inclined to fullness of face and healthy fullness of figure. The hands and feet are in general of medium length and inclined rather to broad than to narrow. Narrow head and face, thin long nose, thin lips, thin long neck, meager chest and bust, narrow pelvis, and long narrow hands and feet, are essentially un-Slavic.

(B) Physiological.—As the Slavs are derived from the same source as the rest of the European populations and in addition are more or less admixed with other parts of these populations, it cannot be expected that they would show any radical differences in functional respects. Nevertheless, due to climate, habits and perhaps other causes, there appear to be certain tendencies or peculiarities.

The first and most important of these relates, as has already been partly pointed out, to the birthrate. The Slavs as a whole show the highest fertility among the more important European peoples. This will be well seen in the tables that follow. The birthrate among the Russians and southern Slavs is relatively enormous; and although the deathrate in these groups is also large, nevertheless the yearly excess of population remains superior to that of all other groups. During the last two decades some diminution in the birthrate has been observed in Bohemia, as everywhere in western Europe, but as yet this is almost restricted to the cities and has affected but very little the rural population. In Poland, Russia, and among the southern Slavs, with the exception of a few cities such as Petrograd, there is no diminution. In some of the Russian provinces the birthrate is nearly twice as large as that of the United States and nearly three times that of the French people in Europe.

The causes of these intensely interesting demographic conditions among the Slavs are not easy to determine. Some of the factors favoring the high birthrate are doubtless the good physical status of the people, and the simple and often hard rural life of the vast majority. Except in Bohemia, parts of Moravia and Poland, and a few spots of Russia, industrialism is but little developed. And among the rural population there is, notwithstanding the prevalent notions about the Russian moujik of the casual observer, relatively little real alcoholism. There is also, self-evidently, but little voluntary restriction. But beyond all this there seems to be something in the Slav make-up which favors a high birth rate, otherwise the phenomenon would not be so general. It is a gift of nature which if properly safeguarded and conserved, would lead to far-reaching consequences in the future.

BIRTH RATE
Among Fifteen Groups of Whites. According to latest available data, before the war.
Whites and Related.
People. Live Children
born yearly
per 1,000
population.
Russians (Europe)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
45.3
Balkan Slavs (approximately)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40.0
Rumanians (largely of Slav blood)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39.2
Czecho-Slovaks (approximately)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
34.0
Spanish
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
33.1
Italians
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31.5
Germans
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29.8
Portuguese
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29.7
English and Welsh
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
28.5
U. S. A. Whites
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
28.0
Dutch
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27.6
Scandinavians
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25.3
Belgians
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23.5
Ireland (Irish and English)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23.3
French
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.7
DEATH RATE AND YEARLY SURPLUS
Among Fifteen Groups of Whites, according to latest data, before the war.
Whites and Related.
People. Per 1,000
Death rate
population,
Birth rate
yearly
Surplus
Scandinavians
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13.4 (25.6) 12.2
Dutch (Europe)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14.4 (27.6) 13.2
U. S. A. Whites
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14.6 (28.0) 13.4
Belgians
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15.0 (23.5) 8.5
English and Welsh
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16.1 (28.5) 12.4
Germans
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16.2 (29.8) 13.6
Irish
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17.1 (23.3) 06.2
Portuguese
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.8 (29.7) 10.9
French
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19.1 (18.7) loss 0.4
Czecho-Slovaks (approximately)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.0 (34.0) 13.0
Italians
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22.8 (32.9) 10.1
Spanish
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23.3 (33.1) 9.8
Rumanians (largely of Slav blood)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24.7 (39.2) 14.5
Balkan Slavs (approx.)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25.0 (40.0) 15.0
Russians (Europe)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25.8 (45.3) 16.7

. . Proportion of Sexes at Birth and in Population.—It is quite possible that if we had absolutely reliable and all-comprehensive data in this repect on the Slav as well as non-Slav peoples, it would be found that certain tendencies are more characteristic of the former than of the latter groups. There are some indications to that effect; but the data on hand fall, unfortunately, in many cases short of the needed precision. As they are, however, they show interesting conditions, as appears below. In proportion of living males to females at birth, the Slavs, while showing some differences among themselves, occupy as a whole a median position among Europeans; in the Balkan Slavs, however, the excess of males becomes rather marked. The proportion of sexes in population, which in a large measure expresses a different series of phenomena, is more exceptional among the Russians and the Balkan Slavs, with a relatively high excess of males, but this excess falls somewhat below the general European average among the Čechs of Bohemia and Moravia.

PROPORTION OF SEXES.
At Birth, and in Present Population in Sixteen European Grops, according to latest data, before the war.
Whites.
No. of males
to 100 females
at birth in
living children.
No. of males
to 100
females in
population.
French
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104.3 097.0
English, Welsh and Scotch
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104.5 094.0
Belgians
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
104.7 098.3
Dutch
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105.2 098.2
Germans
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105.3 098.4
Russians (Europe)
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105.4 100.3
Irish (i. e. Ireland)
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105.6 097.4
Swedes
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105.7 095.6
Italians
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
105.7 099.0
Čechs
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105.9 093.8
U. S. A., native whites
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
105.9 102.7
Norwegians
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
106.3 091.0
Portuguese
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106.5 090.1
Balkan Slavs
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107.0 105.0
Spanish Europe)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
109.0 095.4
Jews (eastern Europe)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
110.0 101.0

Longevity.—While our data in respect to relative longevity may not be all that could be wished for, they are nevertheless sufficient to show that in this respect, too, the Slavs as a whole and some of their groups in particular differ appreciably from the rest of the European population. These conditions are best shown by the data in the next table, derived from the lat est United States and other censuses.

Reliable statistics in this respect on the Čecho-Slovak group are, regrettably, not available in this country; but all the rest of the Slavs will be seen to occupy in the table the most favorable position. This is particularly true of the Balkan Slavs and Greeks, the more northern and even central parts of which contain a great deal of Slav blood. As attention has been directed to these conditions for a long time, and as in rural communities there are generally plenty of witnesses to the age of the persons reported as centenarians, these data cannot be explained away on the assumption of errors. Morever, the phenomenon of longevity is plainly generalized among the Slavs. It has received various explanations, but in all probability is merely a physiological expression of the relatively high grade of soundness of the race.

A good many of the Slav centenarians have been known to reach considerably above one hundred years. Thus in 1912, in Russia, at the 100th aniversary of the Napoleonic war, eight contemporaries and veterans of that war were found still living among the rural Slav population of Russia, and they ranged in age from 109 to 122 years.

CENTENARIANS IN VARIOUS COUNTRIES.
Whites.
Country. Date
of
census
Per 100,000
Number All Male Fe-
male
Total Male Female
Belgium
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1900 8 3 5 0.1 0.1 0.1
Denmark
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1901 2 . . 2 0.1 . . 0.2
German Empire
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1900 40 8 32 0.1 . . 0.1
Switzerland
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1900 2 . . 2 0.1 . . 0.1
Finland
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1900 5 . . 5 0.2 . . 0.4
Netherlands
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1899 8 4 4 0.2 0.2 0.2
England and Wales
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1901 146 47 99 0.4 0.3 0.6
New Zealand
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1906 4 3 1 0.5 0.6 0.2
Italy
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1901 202 69 133 0.6 0.4 0.8
Spain
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1900 152 28 124 0.8 0.3 1.3
Scotland
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1901 41 7 34 0.9 0.3 1.5
United States of America
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1910 764 326 438 0.9 0.8 1.1
Austria
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1900 481 193 288 1.8 1.5 2.2
Hungary (much Slav blood)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1900 604 263 341 3.1 2.7 3.5
Poland (Russian)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1897 358 92 266 3.8 2.0 5.7
Portugal
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1900 316 89 227 5.8 3.4 8.0
Ireland
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1901 497 194 303 11.1 8.8 13.4
Russia
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1897 15,657 6,827 8,830 12.5 10.9 14.0
Greece (much Slav blood)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1907 404 127 277 15.4 9.6 21.2
Servia
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1900 389 230 159 15.6 18.0 13.1
Bulgaria
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1905 2,407 1,039 1,368 59.6 50.5 69.1

Miscellaneous.—Perhaps it is worth while here to mention another physiological feature, which those who have become personally acquainted with the habits of many peoples can not but have noticed among the Slavs, and especially in Russia. The Slavs, and particularly perhaps the Russians, are hearty eaters. This connects in all probability again with their relatively high average of physical condition. In Russia it may also be in part a result of the exacting climate, which calls for plenty of fuel. In the culturally most advanced of the Slavic countries, Bohemia and Moravia, the hearty appetite is connected with and partly converted to a very considerable culinary refinement. All this may be a small matter, yet it is characteristic and very evident to a traveller who comes into intimate contact with the Slavs, from Germany, for instance, or Switzerland, and other countries.

That the Slavs, particularly those of the north and those of the Balkans, are capable of much endurance, has been well shown by the Russians in the Napoleonic, some of the Turkish and the present wars, and by the Serbians and Bulgarians in their past as well as recent wars with Turkey, in the late Serbian struggle and retreat together with the astonishing following rejuvenation, and on many other occasions. This once more is not to be looked upon as any special endowment, but rather as a manifestation of the sound, unspoiled as yet, constitution of this people. The high and as yet artificially but little checked death rate among them contributes to this by eliminating most of the weaker.

Mental characteristics.—This is a dangerous field to tread upon, and would be quite prohibitive to those not personally and thoroughly acquainted with the Slavs, as well as with the more important groups of non-Slavic Europeans. To those, however, who have been fortunate enough to gain close personal knowledge of these various groups, it unquestionably appears that the Slavs as a whole possess certain mental characteristics or shades of characteristics which are better developed or more general than among other groups of the white world. Morever, judging from the remarks and reports of early observers, they were always distinguished by the same features of behavior.

These characteristics are, in the first place, kindness, sociability and hospitality. A typical Slav without these qualities is not imaginable. Togethere with these goes, however, only too frequently overtrustfullness, which, particularly in Russia, has often been abused by imposters to the dettriment of the masses and led repeatedly to near a disaster. The Slav has further an inherent love of music, song, dance, and bright colors; yet at the same time, curiously enough, frequently an inclination to mild melancholy—perhaps in compensation.

He is also often individually jealous, sensitive and unruly; but these with some other faults of his are wrongly taken for “racial” characteristics—they are mostly the outgrowth of inexperience and isolation. The inborn antagonist of the Slavs, the Germans, have seen to it that these faults were enlarged upon, and other peoples have in large part learned of the Slav through the German. It is thus, no doubt, the mischievous notion that the Slavs are less capable of self-government or leadership than other and especially the Teutonic stocks, has originated. Yet the Germans acknowledge freely that they themselves carry a goodly proportion of Slav blood, and as history amply shows have always exhibited an insatiable desire for more; besides which they boast illogically of the Slav as destined to be the “fertilizer for the German race.” The real capacity of the more cultured Slav for self-government and leadership is perhaps best demonstrated in Bohemia. The history of Bohemia shows us that in that intensely Slav country, notwithstanding all the German encroachments and machinations, a single native dynasty, that of Přemysl, has lasted—not counting its prolongation in the female line—for nearly five centuries without interruption; and the same Slavic country has produced Žižka, one of the greatest military leaders of all times; Jan Hus, the leader of religious reformation who antedated and outweighed Luther; Comenius, the world leader in education, etc. The development of government as well as that of leaders, when viewed abstractly seem much more matters of circumstances and education than of special endowments of any particular group.

One of the best and most general characteristics of the Slav is a fondness for work, coupled with dexterity. This is manifest not only in husbandry and agriculture, but in all vocations, except perhaps what may be expressed by the term business. He shows good mechanical ability and inventiveness, but does not—with exceptions of course—make a good business man; not because of inability, but through indifference to money making as such and distaste for the tactics that are usually involved. When it comes to development of or participation in an industry, however, the case is much different. But the business part of industry often remains unsympathetic, and it is on this account that it is found so often left to the Jew, the Armenian, the German and others, who live among and of the Slav. Modern education in a degree is changing these conditions, but they are evidently too basic to be wholly altered by such means.

The Slav is essentially thrifty, but not always very provident, and does not enjoy planning far ahead for the future.

In their civic life, since the earliest known times the Slavs of all branches were essentially democratic and patriarchal. Their attitude toward a centralized government is not the same as among their neighbors; they do not readily submit to any save freely chosen or freely approved authority. Their cherished ideal of power has always been, however, the national assembly rather than the nobility, or king, though their history shows many instances of a strong devotion to capable leaders. Their own nobility was very simple, consisting only of the “Kniazi”, a term meaning “priests” and doubtless signifying the ancient spiritual and later spiritual-temporal leaders. The position of the women among the Slavs was always one corresponding to their individual mental endowment, without social or religious restrictions. One of the first rulers of Bohemia was the famous “kniežna” (“priestess”) Libuša, who with the husband chosen for her at her request by the assembly of the people, founded in the ninth century the house of Přemysl.

The Slav in general is naturally pious. Of old, he developed a relatively high class naturalistic religion of his own, with a single mighty thunder-God in the heavens, and a host of minor deities and spirits, a few bad but most good and poetically conceived, peopling the air, groves, lakes and rivers. Under non-Slav influences he accepted the Christian religion, but to this day there are many traces of the old. And it is characteristic that in accepting a new religion the Russian, for instance, chose on the basis not of dogma, but on that of the beauty and inspiring character of the ceremonials.[1] The majority of the Slavs remain fatihful to the Greek Church to this day. The Poles alone voluntarily accepted Catholicism, which became closely identified with their state institutions, and remains almost exclusively their faith to this day. On the more culturally advanced Čechs the Roman Church was imposed first by circumstances and then by force. They, however, strove early against its failings and originated a reformation which in the early half of the XVth century shook Europe. Today the tenets of dogma have lost much of their power among Slavs in general. The ideal component of faith, however, is and will remain a part of the Slav nature, which finds no happiness in materialism. It is unsatisfying materialism which during the last two or three generations has led, in Russia, to the pessimism which became so marked in many of her writers.

The Slav differs also more or less from other Europeans in his art, poetry, music, and humor. In art, regrettably, he had too much of foreign masters and examples and follows these in a large measure, obscuring his own individuality; still the latter is not effaced, and comes out especially in the native arts, and perhaps in caricature. His poetry is especially epic, dramatic, didactical, light rather than heavy. His music is folk music, and dance, descriptive or martial music, joyous, melodious, stimulating or satisfying, without classicism, Wagnerian roughness, sombreness, rag-time or eastern hypnotic monotony and repetition. The Slav humor is essentially a happy, critical, or especially satyrical natural humor, quite unlike most of the habitual humor of the Anglo-Saxon; and perhaps no nation is better endowed with this quality. Regrettably the highest class of this humor involves subtleties of language which are intranslatable into non-Slav tongues; a disadvantage that is shared by much of the best Slavic literature.

There are other mental qualities of the Slav, such as on one hand his well-known bravery in battle, the proverbial modesty of his women, his linguistic facilities, etc., and on the other some weaknesses, but all these except the last mentioned, he shares fully with other branches of the white race. His faults when studied without prejudice are seen to be primarily the faults of ignorance and inexperience, of instinctive preference of idealism and sentiment to realism, and of unschooled, easily offended individualism. But these defects are more than compensated for by his large share of freedom of covetoutness and of lust of domination, as relates to other peoples. He must not be confounded in this respect, naturally, with some of his rulers, who were not always of Slav extraction.

In a summary, it may be said that strict observation shows the Slav in general to be well endowed physically, as a result of which he shows also certain important physiological advantages. Mentally, on the whole, he has had lesser advantages of intensive training than the more western Europeans and hence is less developed; but his inherent qualities in this respect, also, are good, giving a safe promise for the future.


  1. See Nestor’s Chronicle.


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