The Lively Lark

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The lively lark stretched forth her wing
The messenger of Morning bright;
And with her cheerful voice did sing
The Day's approach, discharging Night;
When that Aurora blushing red,
Descried the guilt of Thetis' bed.
    Laradon tan tan, Tedriton teight

I went abroad to take the air,
And in the meads I met a knight,
Clad in carnation colour fair;
I did salute this gentle wight:
Of him I did his name inquire,
He sighed and said it was Desire.
    Laradon tan tan, Tedriton teight

Desire I did desire to stay;
And while with him I cravèd talk,
The courteous knight said me no nay,
But hand in hand with me did walk;
Then of Desire I ask'd again,
What things did please and what did pain.
    Laradon tan tan

He smiled and thus he answered then:
Desire can have no greater pain,
Than for to see another man,
The things desired to attain;
Nor greater joy can be than this:
That to enjoy that others miss.
       Laridon tan tan

This work was published before January 1, 1924, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.