The Man-Eaters of Tsavo/LOI

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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS[edit]

  • Heads of Eight Lions shot by the Author in British East Africa
  • Mombasa, from the Harbour
  • The Native Quarter, Mombasa
  • Well-wooded hills and slopes on the mainland
  • Vasco da Gama Street and Pillar
  • The best way to get three . . . was by gharri
  • I pitched my tent under some shady palms
  • Kilindini is on the opposite side of the island
  • The Place of Deep Waters
  • A lucky shot brought down the huge bird
  • I slept that night in a little palm hut
  • This interminable nyika
  • The river crossed by means of a temporary bridge
  • Women of Uganda
  • The tent from which jemadar Ungan Singh was carried off
  • My own tent was pitched in an open clearing
  • We shared a hut of palm leaves and boughs
  • The camps of the workmen had also been surrounded by thorn fences
  • Railhead Camp, with its two or three thousand workmen
  • The two wounded coolies were left where they lay, a piece of torn tent having fallen over them
  • A luncheon served in the wilds, with occasionally a friend to share it
  • It very soon became a great pet
  • Heera Singh made a wild spring into the water to get clear of the falling stone
  • The door which was to admit the lion
  • When the trap was ready, I pitched a tent over it
  • They found him stuck fast in the bushes of the boma
  • Perched on the top of water-tanks
  • I took up my position in a crib made of sleepers
  • Whitehead on a Trolley at the exact spot where the Lion jumped upon him
  • Abdullah and his two Wives
  • A party of Wa Jamousi
  • His length from tip of nose to tip of tail was nine feet eight inches
  • Head of the first Man-Eater
  • The following evening I took up my position in this same tree
  • He measured nine feet six inches from tip of nose to tip of tail, and stood three feet eleven and a half inches high
  • The bridge over the Tsavo rapidly neared completion
  • The heavy stones were swung into position
  • The girder was run over its exact place
  • And finally lowered gently into position
  • Very soon I had the satisfaction of seeing the first train cross the finished work
  • The completed Tsavo bridge
  • One of the Trolley Lines after the Flood
  • Swahili Caravan Porters
  • Such was my cook, Mabruki
  • The women . . . wear a long, brightly-coloured cloth
  • The women attire themselves only in a short kilt
  • We arrived at M'Gogo's capital
  • Making pombe in the hollowed-out stump of a tree
  • Wa Taita Men
  • M'Kamba Woman
  • Until it joins the Athi River
  • The banks of the Sabaki are lined with trees
  • I caught sight of a fine waterbuck and successfully bowled him over
  • A young one was lying down in the grass quite close to me
  • A crocodile on the Sabaki
  • Beyond all doubt, the man-eaters' den!
  • Watch the animals come down to drink
  • The antelope swinging by his feet
  • Hippo Head
  • Slaves chained neck to neck as was the custom
  • Hospital Tent at Voi where Mrs. O'Hara rested
  • In the Bazaar at Kampala
  • The great Athi Plains
  • First the earth surface has to be prepared
  • Cuttings have to be made and hollows banked up
  • Another gang drops the rails in their places
  • It never moved again
  • The trophy was well worth the pains I had taken to add it to my collection
  • Jackson's Hartebeeste, and Zebra
  • Waterbuck
  • Fortunately the brute fell dead after this final effort
  • We managed to bring them in triumph to the camp
  • I got near enough for a safe shot, which bowled the antelope over stone-dead
  • Wart-hog
  • A successful snapshot of an impala just after it had been shot
  • A Masai Chief
  • Masai Warriors
  • Masai Woman
  • Masai Girls
  • Masai Women
  • N'derobbo Boy
  • N'derobbo Boy, with Collabus Monkey
  • N'derobbo Girl
  • Wa Kikuyu
  • The women of the Wa Kikuyu carry the heavy loads
  • Spooner's plucky servant, Imam Din
  • A Collection of Trophies
  • He was kept on view for several days, and then shot
  • Impala
  • I took a photograph of him standing reside his fine trophy
  • Succeeded in finishing him off without further trouble
  • Steamer unloading at Kisumu, on Lake Victoria Nyanza
  • The Grand Falls, Tana River
  • Shimone, The Place of Falling Water (Eldama Ravine)
  • Oryx
  • Roan Antelope
  • An excellent, cheery fellow . . . named Landaalu
  • Crossing a Stream on the Cook's Box
  • Crossing the Angarua River
  • Reedbuck
  • The New Eland -- T. oryx pattersonianus
  • Thomson's Gazelle
  • War Canoe on Lake Victoria Nyanza, near the Ripon Falls
  • Preparing Breakfast in Camp
  • View in the Kenya Province
  • A flying visit in a rickshaw to Kampala
  • Clad in long flowing cotton garments
  • Jinja
  • Rushing over the Ripon Falls

The mighty river stretching away to the north amid enchanting scenery

  • Wa Kikuyu Warriors
  • Map of British East Africa
  • Facsimile of address presented to the author on his departure from East Africa in 1899