75%

The New International Encyclopædia/Electoral Votes

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search

ELECTORAL VOTES. The votes cast by Presidential electors in the United States for the Presidential and Vice-Presidential candidates. The candidates for the two offices were not voted for separately until after 1805, before which time the candidate receiving the largest total number of votes at any given election was declared President, and the one receiving the next largest number the Vice-President. The electoral votes cast in the various campaigns since 1789 have been as follows: In 1789: George Washington, 69; John Adams, 34; Samuel Huntington, 2; John Jay, 9; John Hancock, 4; Robert H. Harrison, 6; George Clinton, 3; John Rutledge, 6; John Milton, 2; James Armstrong, Edward Telfair, and Benjamin Lincoln, each, 1. In 1793: George Washington, 132; John Adams, 77; George Clinton, 50; Thomas Jefferson, 4; Aaron Burr, 1. In 1797: John Adams, 71; Thomas Jefferson, 68; Thomas Pinckney, 59; Aaron Burr, 30; Samuel Adams, 15; Oliver Ellsworth, 11; George Clinton, 7; John Jay, 5; James Iredell, 3; Samuel Johnston, George Washington, and John Henry, each, 2; Charles C. Pinckney, 1. In 1801: Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr, each 73; John Adams, 65; C. C. Pinckney, 64; John Jay, 1. In 1805: for President, Thomas Jefferson, 162; C. C. Pinckney, 14; for Vice-President, George Clinton, 162; Rufus King, 14. In 1809: for President, James Madison, 122; C. C. Pinckney, 47; George Clinton, 6; for Vice-President, George Clinton, 113; Rufus King, 47; John Langdon, 9; James Monroe, 3; and James Madison, 3. In 1813: for President, James Madison, 128; De Witt Clinton, 89; for Vice-President, Elbridge Gerry, 131; Jared Ingersoll, 86. In 1817: for President, James Monroe. 183; Rufus King, 34; for Vice-President, Daniel D. Tompkins, 183; John E. Howard, 22; James Ross, 5; John Marshall, 4; Robert G. Harper, 3. In 1821: for President, James Monroe, 231; John Q. Adams, 1; for Vice-President, Daniel D. Tompkins, 218; Richard Stockton, 8; Daniel Rodney, 4; Robert G. Harper, Richard Rush, each, 1. In 1825: for President, John Q. Adams. 84; William H. Crawford, 41; Andrew Jackson, 99; Henry Clay, 37; for Vice-President, John C. Calhoun, 182; Nathan Sanford, 30; Nathaniel Macon, 24; Andrew Jackson, 13; Martin Van Buren, 9; Henry Clay, 2. In 1829: for President, Andrew Jackson, 178; John Quincy Adams, 83; for Vice-President, John C. Calhoun, 171; Richard Rush, 83; William Smith, 7. In 1833: for President, Andrew Jackson, 219; Henry Clay, 49; John Floyd, 11; William Wirt, 7; for Vice-President, Martin Van Buren, 189; John Sergeant, 49; William Wilkins, 30: Henry Lee, 11; Amos Ellmaker, 7. In 1837: for President, Martin Van Buren, 170; William H. Harrison, 73; Hugh L. White, 26; Daniel Webster, 14; Willie P. Mangum, 11; for Vice-President, Richard M. Johnson, 147; Francis Granger, 77; John Tyler, 47; William Smith, 23. In 1841: for President, William H. Harrison, 234; Martin Van Buren, 60; for Vice-President, John Tyler, 234; Richard M. Johnson, 48; Lyttleton W. Tazewell, 11; James K. Polk, 1. In 1845: for President, James K. Polk, 170; Henry Clay, 105; for Vice-President, George M. Dallas, 170; Theodore Frelinghuysen, 105. In 1849: for President, Zachary Taylor, 163; Lewis Cass, 127; for Vice-President, Millard Fillmore, 163; William O. Butler, 127. In 1853: for President, Franklin Pierce, 254; Winfield Scott, 42; for Vice-President, William R. King, 254; William A. Graham, 42. In 1857: for President, James Buchanan, 174; John C. Frémont, 114; Millard Fillmore, 8; for Vice-President, John C. Breckinridge, 174; William L. Dayton, 114; A. J. Donelson, 8. In 1861: for President, Abraham Lincoln, 180; John C. Breckinridge, 72; Stephen A. Douglas, 12; John Bell, 39; for Vice-President, Hannibal Hamlin, 180; .Joseph Lane, 72; Herschel V. Johnson, 12; Edward Everett, 39. In 1865: for President, Abraham Lincoln, 212: George B. McClellan, 21; for Vice-President, Andrew Johnson, 212; George H. Pendleton, 21. In 1869: for President, Ulysses S. Grant, 214; Horatio Seymour, 80; for Vice-President, Schuyler Colfax, 214; Frank P. Blair, Jr., 80. In 1873: for President, Ulysses S. Grant, 286; Thomas A. Hendricks, 42; B. Gratz Brown, 18 (Horace Greeley having died in November, 1872); Charles J. Jenkins, 2; David Davis, 1; for Vice-President, Henry Wilson, 286; B. Gratz Brown, 47; G. W. Julian, A. H. Colquitt, each, 5; J. M. Palmer, T. E. Bramlette, each, 3; W. S. Groesbeck, W. B. Machen, N. P. Banks, each, 1. In 1877: for President, Rutherford B Hayes, 185; Samuel J. Tilden, 184; for Vice-President, William A. Wheeler, 185; Thomas A. Hendricks, 184. In 1881: for President, James A. Garfield, 214; Winfield S. Hancock, 155; for Vice-President, Chester A. Arthur, 214; William H. English, 155. In 1885: for President, Grover Cleveland, 219; James G. Blaine, 182; for Vice-President, Thomas A. Hendricks, 219; John A. Logan, 182. In 1889: for President, Benjamin Harrison, 233; Grover Cleveland, 168; for Vice-President, Levi P. Morton, 233; Allen G. Thurman, 168. In 1893: for President, Grover Cleveland, 277; Benjamin Harrison, 145; J. B. Weaver, 22; for Vice-President, A. E. Stevenson, 277; W. Reid, 145; J. G. Field, 22. In 1897: for President, William McKinley, 271; William J. Bryan, 176; for Vice-President, Garret A. Hobart, 271; Arthur Sewall, 149; Thomas E. Watson, 27. In 1901: for President, William McKinley, 292; William J. Bryan, 155; for Vice-President, Theodore Roosevelt, 292; A. E. Stevenson, 155. Consult Stanwood, History of the Presidency (Boston, 1898).