The New Student's Reference Work/Josephus, Flavius

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Jose′phus, Flavius (Joseph ben Matthias), a Jewish writer and historian, was born at Jerusalem in 37 A. D. of a distinguished family, and was thoroughly educated.  He finally entered the sect of the Pharisees.  In 63 A. D. he was sent to Rome on a political mission, and, being successful, became a man of consideration among his countrymen.  During the Jewish insurrection he was in command of affairs in Galilee.  When he finally fell into the hands of the Romans, he saved his life by acute flattery, predicting the rise of Vespasian to the imperial throne.  The latter half of his life was passed as a resident of Rome in learned leisure.  Not all of his writings have come to us, but we have a history of the Jewish wars from 170 B. C. to the destruction of Jerusalem; a history of the Jews from the creation to 66 A. D,: an autobiography; and a work against Apion.  The date of his death is not known, but probably he died about 95 A. D.