The Roman Breviary

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The Roman Breviary  (1908) 
translated by
John Patrick Crichton-Stuart

The Roman Breviary (Latin: Breviarium Romanum) is one of the official Roman-rite Catholic versions of the canonical hours (also called the Divine Office, Work of God, Liturgy of the Hours, or simply the Office or Breviary), a collection of public prayers recited at certain times of the day. It developed gradually in the Middle Ages from various collections of Psalms and prayers, and gradually gained popularity until it was standardised throughout the church by Pope Pius V's edict Quod a nobis (1586). Since then it has undergone many revisions.

Following the Second Vatican Council, a new version of the hours with many differences to the Breviary was published in 1978 under the title Liturgy of the Hours (Latin: Liturgia Horarum). Since Benedict XVI's 2007 motu proprio Summorum pontificum, the hours may be said by clergy according to either the 1960 edition of the Breviary (in Latin) or the Liturgy of the Hours (in any language).


THE ROMAN BREVIARY

THE ROMAN BREVIARY

REFORMED BY ORDER OF THE HOLY
ŒCUMENICAL COUNCIL OF TRENT;
PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF POPE ST
PIUS V.; AND REVISED BY CLEMENT
VIII.
, URBAN VIII., AND LEO XIII.

TOGETHER WITH THE
OFFICES SINCE GRANTED
AND THE MARTYROLOGY


TRANSLATED OUT OF
LATIN INTO ENGLISH BY
JOHN, MARQUESS OF BUTE, K.T.


A NEW EDITION
FOR USE IN ENGLAND


IN FOUR VOLS.


WILLIAM BLACKWOOD AND SONS
EDINBURGH AND LONDON
MCMVIII


Copyright.svg PD-icon.svg This work is a translation and has a separate copyright status to the applicable copyright protections of the original content.
Original:

This work was published before January 1, 1926, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.

 
Translation:

This work was published before January 1, 1926, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.