The Room in the Tower and Other Stories

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The Room in the Tower and Other Stories  (1912) 
by E. F. Benson
Mills and Boon, London, 1912 ed. Advertisement pages omitted.

Benson was also known as a writer of atmospheric and at times humorous or satirical ghost stories, which were often first published in story magazines . . . His 1906 short story, "The Bus-Conductor", about a person haunted by a hearse driver, has been adapted several times, notably during 1944 (for the movie Dead of Night and as an anecdote in Bennett Cerf's Ghost Stories anthology published the same year) and for a 1961 episode of The Twilight Zone. The catchphrase from the story, "Room for one more", created a legend,and also occurs in the 1986 Oingo Boingo song, "Dead Man's Party". Excerpted from E. F. Benson on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.


THE
ROOM IN THE TOWER
AND OTHER STORIES

BY
E. F. BENSON
AUTHOR OF
"THE ANGEL OF PAIN," "SHEAVES"

SECOND EDITION

MILLS & BOON, LIMITED


49 RUPERT STREET
LONDON W.

Published 1912

Copyright in the United States of America, 1912, by E. F. Benson

PREFACE

THESE stories have been written in the hopes of giving some pleasant qualms to their reader, so that, if by chance, anyone may be occupying in their perusal a leisure half-hour before he goes to bed when the night and the house are still, he may perhaps cast an occasional glance into the corners and dark places of the room where he sits, to make sure that nothing unusual lurks in the shadow. For this is the avowed object of ghost-stories and such tales as deal with the dim unseen forces which occasionally and perturbingly make themselves manifest. The author therefore fervently wishes his readers a few uncomfortable moments.

Some of those tales have appeared before in various magazines; the remainder are new. One, the story of “The Man who went too Far,” is the germ of what subsequently developed into a book called “The Angel of Pain.”

E. F. BENSON.

CONTENTS

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1928.


The longest-living author of this work died in 1940, so this work is in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 82 years or less. This work may be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.