The Times/1925/Obituary/Death of J. P. Anderson

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Death of J. P. Anderson

A correspondent writes:—A larger circle of friends on both sides of the Atlantic will have heard with regret of the passing, at a very advanced age, of Mr. John Parker Anderson, at his residence at Palmer's Green, N. Mr. Anderson entered the service of the British Museum Library in 1860, and rose through various grades to be Superintendent of Sections and Clerk of the Reading Room. In the early eighties Mr. Anderson rendered excellent service as Superintendent of the Cooper's-gardens Night School, in Shoreditch, an institution which owed much to the fostering care and public spirit of the late Lady Burdett-Coutts. He placed all students of local history under a lasting obligation by the publication of his "Book of British Topography," in 1881, and by the valuable bibliographies which he contributed to the "Great Writers Series," published by Mr. Walter Scott. He was also associated with Mr. James Samuelson in his short-lived periodical venture entitled "Subjects of the Day." Throughout his long and eminently useful career Mr. Anderson revealed himself as a genial personality whose vast stores of erudition were always placed without stint at the disposal of many generations of students at the National Library.

This work was published before January 1, 1926 and it is anonymous or pseudonymous due to unknown authorship. It is in the public domain in the United States as well as countries and areas where the copyright terms of anonymous or pseudonymous works are 95 years or less since publication.