The Travels of Dean Mahomet

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The Travels of Dean Mahomet  (1794) 
by Sake Dean Mahomed

This is considered the first work in English by an Indian.

Sake Deen Mahomet.jpg
Dean Mahomet
an
East Indian

THE

TRAVELS

OF

DEAN MAHOMET,

A NATIVE OF

PATNA IN BENGAL,

THROUGH SEVERAL PARTS OF

INDIA,

While in the Service of The Honourable

Y.



F,
In a Series of Letters to a Friend.



IN TWO VOLUMES.



Vol. I.



CORK:

PRINTED BY J. CONNOR,

At the Circulating Library, No 17, Corner of Castle-street,
opposite the Square.



1794.



CONTENTS

OF

VOLUME THE FIRST.



LETTER I.

PAGE

A SKETCH of the Author's country, with an account of his birth: his father's fate in war, Raja Boudmal's submission, and his brother's promotion.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
1

LETTER II.

The Author resides some time in Patna with his mother: description of the Raja's entertainment, at which the Author first notices Mr. Baker, whom he afterwards meets in a tennis court, and earnestly desires to follow, through a particular attachment to him, and great passion for a military life.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
10

LETTER III.

The Author leaves his Mother, and goes with Mr. Baker to Bankeepore: situation of the camp there: description of the officer's bangaloes, soldiers' barrack, Seapoys' chaumnies: site of Mr. Goolden's house: account of a famine.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
20

LETTER IV.

Tender interview between the Author and his mother: his brother comes to Mr. Baker to prevail on him to send him home: Mr. Baker's generosity on the occassion: march to Denapore: description of the barrack: situation of the General's residence: view of the surrounding country.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
30

LETTER V.

The army receive orders to march from Denapore to Chrimnasa: description of the attendants to the quarter masters: situation of the camp at Fulwherea.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
39

LETTER VI.

A few straggling villagers steal unperceived into the camp: plunder some tents and marquees: carry off the Author on a palanquin which is described: rob him: some resolve to take his life, others against, obtain his freedom: he returns to the camp: some of the villagers taken and punished: jackals infest the camp: the army marches towards Chrimnasa: the natives venerable regard for their wells accounted for.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
48

LETTER VII.

The army arrive at Chrimnasa, and after a few months stay there, receive orders to march to Monghere: description of a Faquir and hermitage near it: arrival there: fort and barracks described: ingenuity and manufactures of the inhabitants.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
56

LETTER VIII.

Description of the seats and villas round Monghere: character of Mr. Bateman: account of the monument on the hill Peepaharea: imprudence of a Lieut. of the artillery: his untimely fate: the army receive orders to proceed to Calcutta: seven baths or wells near Sitakund described: the army halt at Bohogolpore: account of it's situation, military strength, and manufactures: of Captain Brook: the Pahareas, and the punishment inflicted on them.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
65

LETTER IX.

March continued from Bohogolpore towards Calcutta: reach Rajamoul: ferocity of the Pahareas: skirmish with them, in which two hundred are taken prisoners and punished: encamp at Gouagochi: it's pleasant situation: arrive at Dumdumma: grand review there: Governor Cottier is entertained by the Officers &c.: scene of their convivial meeting.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
75

LETTER X.

Arrival at Calcutta: description of it: of the old fort, and Fort-William: of the docks, hospital, villas, gardens, and canal outside the town.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
85

LETTER XI.

Departure from Calcutta: arrival at Barahampore: situation of the cantonments there: of Muxadabad: it's suburbs; Nabob's Palace: his grand procession to the mazide or temple, with all his retinue.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
93

LETTER XII.

Description of the different baptisms and circumcision of a Mahometan Child, at which the Author attended.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
104

LETTER XIII.

Account of the Mahometan ceremony of marriage.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
114

LETTER XIV.

Of the temperance the Mahometans: their resignation at the approach of death: account of their funerals: sketch of their religion.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
124

LETTER XV.

Of the dancing girls: their manners and dress: remarkable instance of the generosity of one.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
133

LETTER XVI.

March from Barahampore to Denapore: of the brigades on the Bengal establishment: of the Seapoys: their military dress: explanation of Persian and Indian terms.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
143

LETTER XVII.

March from Denapore to Belagram: the army halt at Benaras: description of it: of the beautiful country about it: description of the city continued: it's buildings, gauts or slips: farai: pagodas: tanks: manufactures; Raja's palace.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
159

LETTER XVIII.

Of the religion of the Hindoos: their food, and manner of burying their dead.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
167

LETTER XIX.

March continued towards Belgram: description of the country: of the fort and palace of Alahabad: climate, soil, flowers, fruits, &c.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
177

LETTER XX.

The army arrive at Belgram: dispute between the Nabob Aspa-doulah and the Fouzdars Maboub and Coffi-bussant: Maboub invites our Officers to dine and previously poisons the provisions intended for them: his intentions disclosed: a detachment is sent from Gen Stibbert to assist the Nabob against Maboub and his confederate: the former is taken, the latter escapes with his vanquished forces: Capt. Gravely receives a wound, of which he dies at Belgram, where he is interred,
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
184


This work was published before January 1, 1926, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.