The jolly beggar/The Duke of Argyle's courtship to an English lady

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The Duke of Argyle's Courtship to an English Lady.

Did you ever hear of a loyal Scot,
Who was never concern'd in any plot,
I wish it might fall to my lot,
To marry you my dearie, O.

I wish I had you in Kintyre,
And there your beauty I would admire,
O then I would have my heart's desire,
If you would marry me my dearie, O.

You shall have plenty of barley bannock store,
With geese and fine ducks at the door,
And a good chaff-bed upon the floor,
If you will marry me my dearie, O.

You shall have plenty of good Scots kail,
With a good fat haggis at every meal,
After that, good Scots cakes and ale,
If you will marry me my dearie, O.

O get you gone you saucy Scot,
Your haggis shall never boil in my pot,
For you are a proud and prating sot,
And never shall be my dearie, O.

I will clout your hose and mend your shoon,
And if you chance to hae a son,
I'll make him laird when all is done.
If you will marry me my dearie, O.

Your clouted hose I cannot wear
Your mended shoes I can't endure,
And for your lordship I am not sure,
And I never shall be your dearie, O.

The deil pick out your twa black een,
I wish your face I ne'er had seen,
For you are a proud and saucy queen,
And you never shall be my dearie, O.

I am a noble lord of high renown,
I am great Argyle when I come to town
But my blue bonnet has fallen down
And you never shall be my dearie, O.

O pardon, pardon Argyle, allow,
For what I have done in saying so,
To the highland hills with you I'll go,
I long to be your dearie, O.

There is not a whore in London town,
Shall set a foot on Campbell's ground,
For I am related to the crown.
And you never shall be my dearie, O.

I am a noble lord of great renown,
I am great Argyle when I come to town;
Whole drums do beat and trumpets sound,
You never shall be my dearie, O.

I wish I had you in Lancashire,
The follow me through dub and mire,
Yet hats from bonnets might retire,
And you never shall be my dearie, O.


This work was published before January 1, 1925, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.