United States Statutes at Large/Volume 1/5th Congress/2nd Session/Chapter 76

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July 16, 1798.
[Repealed.]
Chap. ⅬⅩⅩⅥ.—An Act to augment the Army of the United States, and for other purposes.


Section 1. Augmentation of the regiments of infantry.
1799, ch. 31.
1802, ch. 9.
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That from and after the passing of this act, each regiment of infantry in the army of the United States shall consist of one lieutenant-colonel commandant, two majors, one adjutant, one paymaster, one quartermaster, one surgeon, two surgeon’s mates, ten captains, ten lieutenants, ten ensigns, one sergeant-major, one quartermaster sergeant, two senior musicians, forty sergeants, forty corporals, twenty musicians, and six hundred privates; and that the several regiments of infantry now in the service of the United States, be augmented accordingly: Provided always, that the President of the United States may, in his discretion, appoint and distribute such additional number of Surgeon’s mates.surgeon’s mates, and for such length of time, as the exigencies of the service may require.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted,Additional twelve regiments of infantry and six troops of light dragoons to be raised. That the President of the United States be, and he hereby is authorized to raise, in addition to the present military establishment, twelve regiments of infantry, and six troops of light dragoons, to be enlisted for and during the continuance of the existing differences between the United States and the French Republic, unless sooner discharged; and the said six troops, together with the two troops of dragoons now in service,Regiment of dragoons to be formed. shall be formed into a regiment, and there shall be appointed thereto one lieutenant-colonel commandant, two majors, one adjutant, one paymaster, one quartermaster, one sergeant-major, and one quartermaster-sergeant, whose pay and emoluments, as well as those of the cornets respectively, shall be the same as are by law allowed to officers of the same grades in the infantry.

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted,General and staff officers. That there shall be two major-generals, with two aids-de-camp each; one inspector-general, with the rank, pay and emoluments of a major-general, and two aids-de-camp; three brigadier-generals, in addition to the present establishment; two assistant inspectors (who shall be taken from the line of the army;) one adjutant-general, with one or more assistant or assistants (to be taken from the line of the army), and four chaplains.

Sec. 4. And be it further enacted,Their pay and subsistence. That the major-generals respectively shall be entitled to one hundred and sixty-six dollars monthly pay, with twenty dollars allowance for forage monthly, and for daily subsistence fifteen rations, or money in lieu thereof at the contract price; the adjutant-general shall be entitled to the rank, pay and emoluments of a brigadier-general; each chaplain to the pay and emoluments of a major; the aids-de-camp and assistant inspectors shall each be entitled to twenty-four dollars monthly, in addition to their pay in the line, and to four rations of provisions each for their daily subsistence; and whenever forage shall not be furnished by the public, to ten dollars per month in lieu thereof.

Sec. 5. And be it further enacted,Soldiers to be able bodied, &c. That each non-commissioned officer, private and musician, who shall hereafter be enlisted for the army of the United States, shall be able bodied, and of a size and age, suitable for the public service, according to the directions, which the President of the United States shall and may establish, and shall he entitled to Bounty.a bounty of twelve dollars; but the payment of four dollars thereof shall be deferred until he shall have joined the army: and each commissioned officer who shall be employed in the recruiting service, shall Allowance to recruiting officers.be entitled to receive for each such non-commissioned officer and private and for each sufficient musician, duly enlisted and mustered, the sum of two dollars.

Sec. 6. And be it further enacted,Pay of men. That the monthly pay of the non-commissioned officers, musicians and privates in the army of the United States, from and after the first day of August next, shall be as follows: cadets, ten dollars, and two rations per day; sergeant-majors, and quartermaster-sergeants, ten dollars; senior musicians, eight dollars; sergeants, eight dollars; corporals, seven dollars; musicians, six dollars; privates, five dollars; artificers to the infantry and artillery, and farriers and saddlers to the dragoons, shall be allowed each the monthly pay of ten dollars. Their subsistence.That every non-commissioned officer, private and musician shall receive daily the following rations of provisions, to wit: one pound and a quarter of beef, or three quarters of a pound of pork, eighteen ounces of bread or flour, a gill of rum, brandy or whiskey, and at the rate of two quarts of salt, four quarts of vinegar, four pounds of soap, and one pound and a half of candles to every hundred rations.

Sec. 7. And be it further enacted,The President may appoint four teachers of the arts and sciences necessary for artillerists and engineers. That the President of the United States be, and he hereby is authorized to appoint a number, not exceeding four, teachers of the arts and sciences necessary for the instruction of the artillerists and engineers, who shall be entitled to the monthly pay of fifty dollars, and two rations per day.

Sec. 8. And be it further enacted,Troops to take an oath; and how they shall be governed. That the officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians and privates raised by virtue of this act, shall take and subscribe the oath or affirmation prescribed by the law, intituled “An act to ascertain and fix the military establishment of the United States,” and they shall be governed by the rules and articles of war, which have been or may be established by law, and shall be entitled to the legal emoluments in case of wounds or disabilities received while in actual service, and in the line of duty. And in recess of Senate, The President may make appointments in the recess.the President of the United States is hereby authorized to appoint all the regimental officers proper to be appointed under this act, and likewise to make appointments to fill any vacancies in the army, which may have happened during the present session of the Senate.

Sec. 9. And be it further enacted,Inspector of artillery to be appointed. That there shall be appointed an inspector of the artillery, taken from the line of artillerists and engineers, who shall be allowed thirty dollars per month in addition to his pay in the line, and four rations of provisions for his daily subsistence, and whenever forage shall not be furnished by the public he shall be allowed ten dollars per month instead thereof.

Approved, July 16, 1798.