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United States Statutes at Large/Volume 3/13th Congress/3rd Session/Chapter 61

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Feb. 27, 1815.
Chap. LXI.—An Act to provide additional revenues for defraying the expenses of government, and maintaining the public credit, by laying a duty on gold, silver and plated ware, and jewelry and pastework, manufactured within the United States.[1]

Duty upon gold, silver, and plated ware.Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That from and after the eighteenth day of April next, there shall be paid upon all gold, silver, and plated ware, and jewelry and pastework, except timepieces, which shall thereafter be manufactured or made for sale within the United States or the territories thereof, a duty of six per centum ad valorem, by the manufacturer thereof.

Regulations concerning the tax.
Act of Jan. 18, 1815, ch. 23.
Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the duty aforesaid shall be imposed, paid, collected, and accounted for, in like manner, and subject to the like provisions and penalties, as the duties imposed by the “Act to provide additional revenues for defraying the expenses of government, and maintaining the public credit, by laying duties on various goods, wares, and merchandise, manufactures within the United States,” passed the eighteenth day of January, one thousand eight hundred and fifteen, all the provisions of which act shall apply to the duty hereby imposed, and to those by whom it shall be payable, the same as if it were specifically inserted among the dutiable objects enumerated in the first section thereof.

Approved, February 27, 1815.


  1. Repealed by act of Act of Feb. 22, 1816, ch. 18.