United States Statutes at Large/Volume 4/18th Congress/1st Session/Chapter 167

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search


May 26, 1824.
Chap. CLXVII.—An Act to alter the judicial districts of Virginia, and for other purposes.[1]

Counties to compose a part of the western, instead of the eastern judicial district of Virginia.Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the following counties in the state of Virginia shall be a part of the eastern judicial district of Virginia, and shall be added to, and form a part of, the western district, that is to say: the counties of Botetourt, Rockbridge, Alleghany, Bath, Pendleton, Augusta, Rockingham, Shenandoah, Frederick, Jefferson, Berkley, Morgan, Hampshire, and Hardy: and that, in addition to the terms of the district court now holden in the western district the judge of the said western district shall hold two terms in each year, at Staunton, in the county of Augusta.

Times and places fixed for the holding of the courts.Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the terms of the court in the said western district shall be held on the days and at the places hereinafter mentioned, viz: at Staunton, on the second Mondays in April and September; at Wythe Courthouse, on the third Mondays in April and September; at Lewisburg, on the fourth Mondays in April and September; and at Clarksburg, on the fourth Mondays in May and October, in each year.

Courts to be adjourned should the judge not attend.Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That if the judge shall not attend on the first day of any court, such court shall stand adjourned, from day to day, for three days, if the same cause continue; after which time, if the judge shall still fail to attend, the court shall stand adjourned until the first day of the next term.

Power of the said judge.Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That the judge of said court shall have power to hold special sessions, at his discretion, at either of the said places, for the trial of civil or criminal cases.

Approved, May 26, 1824.