United States v. South-Eastern Underwriters Association

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United States v. South-Eastern Underwriters Association by Hugo Black
Syllabus

United States v. South-Eastern Underwriters Association, 322 U.S. 533 (1944) is a United States Supreme Court decision that held that the Sherman Act, the federal antitrust statute, applied to insurance. To reach this decision, the Court held that insurance could be regulated by the United States Congress under the Commerce Clause, overturning Paul v. Virginia. Excerpted from United States v. South-Eastern Underwriters Association on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

United States Supreme Court

322 U.S. 533

United States  v.  South-Eastern Underwriters Association

 Argued: Jan. 11, 1944. --- Decided: June 5, 1944

See 65 S.Ct. 26.

On Appeal from the District Court of the United States for the Northern District of Georgia.

Mr. Francis Biddle, Atty. Gen., for appellant.

Messrs. John T. Cahill, of New York City, and Dan MacDougald, of Atlanta, Ga., for appellees.

Mr. Justice BLACK delivered the opinion of the Court.

Notes[edit]

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).