Weird Tales/Volume 31/Issue 3

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Pastel cover of Weird Tales, dated March.  Featuring a naked woman with her back to the viewer recoiling slightly from a skull, while being entangled by a stream of smoke coming from the skull's jaws.  The background is a flat red.  The tag line reads "16th Year of Publication".  The captions read: "Incense of Abomination - a daring story of Devil-worship—the Black Mass—strange suicides by Seabury Quinn; H. P. Lovecraft; Henry Kuttner; Thorp McClusky; Jack Williamson".

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A MAGAZINE OF THE BIZARRE AND UNUSUAL

Weird Tales

REGISTERED IN U.S. PATENT OFFICE


Volume 31 CONTENTS FOR MARCH, 1938 Number 3
Cover Design M. Brundage
Illustrating "Incense of Abomination"
"Like one, that on a lonesome road" Virgil Finlay 257
Pictorial interpretation from "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner"
Incense of Abomination Seabury Quinn 259
A daring story of Devil-worship, strange suicides, and Jules de Grandin
The Poets Robert E. Howard 279
Posthumous verse, by a late master of weird literature
The Thing on the Floor Thorp McClusky 280
The story of art unscrupulous hypnotist, and the frightful thing called Stepan
Dreadful Sleep Jack Williamson 298
A romantic and tragic tale of fearsome beings that lay in slumber under the antarctic ice
The Shadow on the Screen Henry Kuttner 320
A weird story of Hollywood and the silver screen
Beyond the Wall of Sleep H. P. Lovecraft 331
What splendid yet terrible experiences came to the poor mountaineer while he slept?
The Hairy Ones Shall Dance (end) Gans T. Field 339
A novel of terror and sudden death, and the frightful thing that laired in the Devil's Croft
Guarded Mearle Prout 354
A brief tale of murder—by the author of "The Home of the Worm"
The Teakwood Box Johns Harrington 358
San Pedro Joe found the secret in that intricately carved Oriental box
To Howard Phillips Lovecraft Francis Flagg 361
Sonnet to a late master of weird literature
The Head in the Window Roy Temple House 362
A brief tale, adapted from ike German of Wilhelm von Scholz
Weird Story Reprint:
The Girl from Samarcand
E. Hoffmann Price 367
A favorite tale by a master of fantasy, reprinted by popular demand
The Eyrie 378
Wherein the readers of WEIRD TALES voice their opinions


Published monthly by the Popular Fiction Publishing Company, 2457 East Washington Street, Indianapolis, Ind. Entered as second-class matter March 20, 1923, at the post office at Indianapolis, Ind., under the act of March 3, 1879. Single copies, 25 cents. Subscription rates: One year in the United States and possessions, Cuba, Mexico, South America. Spain, $2.50; Canada, $2.75; elsewhere, $3.00. English office: Otis A. Kline, c/o John Paradise, 86 Strand, W. C. 2, London. The publishers are not responsible for the loss of unsolicited manuscripts, although every care will be taken of such material while in their possession. The contents of this magazine are fully protected by copyright and must not be reproduced either wholly or in part without permission from the publishers.

NOTE—All manuscripts and communications should be addressed to the publishers' Chicago office at 840 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Ill.

FARNSWORTH WRIGHT, Editor.

Copyright, 1938, by the Popular Fiction Publishing Company,

COPYRIGHTED IN GREAT BRITAIN

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COMING NEXT MONTH


At the core of the strange garden, where a circular space was still vacant amid the crowding growths, Adompha came to a mound of loamy, fresh-dug earth. Beside it, wholly nude, and pale and supine as if in death, there lay the odalisque Thuloneah. Near her, various knives and other implements, together with vials of liquid balsams and viscid gums that Dwerulas used in his grafting, had been emptied upon the ground from a leathern bag. A plant known as the dedaim, with a bulbous, pulpy, whitish-green bole from whose center rose and radiated several leafless reptilian boughs, dripped upon Thuloneah's bosom an occasional drop of yellowish-red ichor from incisions made in its smooth bark.

Behind the loamy mound, Dwerulas rose to view with the suddenness of a demon emerging from his subterrene lair. In his hands he held the spade with which he had just finished digging a deep and grave-like hole. Beside the regal stature and girth of Adompha. he seemed no more than a wizened dwarf. His aspect bore all the marks of immense age, as if dusty centuries had sered his flesh and sucked the blood from his veins. His eyes glowed in the bottom of pit-like orbits; his features were black and sunken as those of a long-dead corpse; his body was gnarled as some millennial desert cedar. He stooped incessantly, so that his lank, knotty arms hung almost to the ground. Adompha marveled at the strength of those arms; marveled that Dwerulas could have wielded the heavy shovel so expeditiously, could have carried to the garden on his back the burden of those victims whose members he had utilized in his experiments. The king had never demeaned himself to assist at such labors; but, after indicating from time to time the people whose disappearance would in no wise displease him, had done nothing more than watch and supervise the baroque gardening.

"Is she dead?" Adompha questioned, eyeing the luxurious limbs and body of Thuloneah without emotion.

"Nay," said Dwerulas, in a voice harsh as a rusty coffin-hinge, "but I have administered to her the drowsy and overpowering juice-of the dedaim. Her heart beats impalpably, her blood flows with the sluggishness of that mingled ichor. She will not reawaken ... save as a part of the garden's life, sharing its obscure sentience. I wait now your further instructions. What portion ... or portions?"

"Her hands were very deft," said Adompha, as if musing aloud, in reply to the half-uttered question. "They knew the subtle ways of love and were learned in all amorous arcs. I would have you preserve her hands ... but nothing else." ...

A strange story indeed is this, written in the magic words of one of the greatest living masters of weird fiction. What happened to Thuloneah when her arms were grafted to the dedaim tree makes a fascinating and unusual weird story of immense interest and power. It will be printed complete in the April issue of Weird Tales:


The Garden of Adompha


By Clark Ashton Smith


———Also———

An unusual story aboat a white girl in a Hindoo temple and the loving arms of the gracious lady that protected her on the night when she was to become the Bride of Siva.

A fascinating story of flashing jewels and an old Egyptian tomb—a story with a strange and terrible climax.

A story of many thrills—a tale of weird adventures and dire perils in the Dead Forest of Sanaala.

An odd and curious story is this, about a fatal game of cards, played with a most peculiar deck containing neither spades, hearts, diamonds nor clubs.


November Issue Weird Tales
.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .
Out March 1

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ALSO—OTHER STORIES


In addition to the full length novel, this book also contains three shorter stories by well-known authors of thrilling weird-scientific fiction:

Ooze, by Anthony M. Rud, tells of a biologist who removed the growth limitations from an amoeba, and the amazing catastrophe that ensued.

Penelope, by Vincent Starrett, is a fascinating tale of the star Penelope, and fantastic thing that happened when the star was in perihelion.

An Adventure in the Fourth Dimension, by Farnsworth Wright, is an uproarious skit on the four-dimensional theories of the mathematicians and inter-planetary stories in general.


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This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was legally published within the United States (or the United Nations Headquarters in New York subject to Section 7 of the United States Headquarters Agreement) before 1964, and copyright was not renewed.

For Class A renewals records (books only) published between 1923 and 1963, check the Stanford University Copyright Renewal Database.
For other renewal records of publications between 1922–1950 see the University of Pennsylvania copyright records scans.
For all records since 1978, search the U.S. Copyright Office records.

Works published in 1938 would have had to renew their copyright in either 1965 or 1966, i.e. at least 27 years after it was first published / registered but not later than in the 28th year. As it was not renewed, it entered the public domain on .